I just found out.


Horst

Link Posted 28/11/2015 - 12:19
When shooting from a tripod and having to use a long exposure time. Somewhere between 1/30 and 2 seconds, the exposure can be completely vibration free, by using the self timer.
The self timer lifts the mirror as soon as the release button is pressed and keeps it up until the exposure is finished.

But did you know, this happens only with the 2 second setting? The 12 second setting does not rise the mirror from the start, but it works just like a normal exposure.

Regards, Horst

JohnX

Link Posted 28/11/2015 - 12:31
Thanks Horst. It's a good little tip.

I've been using this 2 sec timer technique for a long time.

Only problem is, I often forget to switch it off, so the next time I use the camera hand-held it's often accompanied by swearing on the first shot!
Last Edited by JohnX on 28/11/2015 - 12:31

alfpics

Link Posted 28/11/2015 - 12:37
I too have been sing this feature from film days with the Z1-P, and concur with Johnx - forget to turn it off, and often miss that quick shot next time round when going for a handheld shot!
Andy

WaypointCharlie

Link Posted 28/11/2015 - 12:51
Also, when using the 2 sec self-timer with bracketed exposure you get a 2 sec delay between each exposure bracket. When using the 12 sec self-timer you only get a delay before the first exposure, the rest are fired off as a normnal burst.

As for forgetting to turn off the timer, you can always disable the drive mode memory via page 5 of the settings menu. The camera will then reset to single frame shooting when you turn it off. Ideally I'd like it to retain the setting for a few minutes after it's turned off, but nothing is perfect!
Last Edited by WaypointCharlie on 28/11/2015 - 12:58

JohnX

Link Posted 28/11/2015 - 18:36
WaypointCharlie wrote:


As for forgetting to turn off the timer, you can always disable the drive mode memory via page 5 of the settings menu. The camera will then reset to single frame shooting when you turn it off. Ideally I'd like it to retain the setting for a few minutes after it's turned off, but nothing is perfect!

Thanks Waypoint. Problem solved!

tyronet2000

Link Posted 28/11/2015 - 19:08
JohnX wrote:
Thanks Horst. It's a good little tip.

I've been using this 2 sec timer technique for a long time.

Only problem is, I often forget to switch it off, so the next time I use the camera hand-held it's often accompanied by swearing on the first shot!

Ha Ha always feel embarrassed when the beep beep beep of the timer starts, there is ALWAYS some one within earshot
Regards
Stan

PPG

Jonathan-Mac

Link Posted 28/11/2015 - 19:44
I've used this method for ages, that's what the two-second delay is for.
Pentax hybrid user - Digital K3 & K200D, film 645 and 35mm SLR and Pentax (&other) lenses adapted to Fuji X digital
Fan of DA limited and old manual lenses

davidwozhere

Link Posted 28/11/2015 - 20:55
Never thought of disabling the drive memory - I too have been caught out with that one many times.

The recommended procedure is also to remove the eyecup and replace it with the viewfinder cover to prevent extra light fooling the meter. It's a right caper to do this. I carry a push-on plastic lens cap with me and simply plop it over the eyecup - job done!
Both the *istDS and the K5 are incurably addicted to old glass

My page on Photocrowd - link

Gwyn

Link Posted 28/11/2015 - 21:28
tyronet2000 wrote:

Ha Ha always feel embarrassed when the beep beep beep of the timer starts, there is ALWAYS some one within earshot

I have all beeps turned off. Almost the first thing I do with cameras, computers and phones is turn off spurious noises.

JohnX

Link Posted 28/11/2015 - 22:18
davidwozhere wrote:
I carry a push-on plastic lens cap with me and simply plop it over the eyecup - job done!

Another great tip, although I confess I never bother to cover the eyepiece and can't say I've experienced any dodgy exposures as a consequence.

What size lens cap is it please?
Last Edited by JohnX on 28/11/2015 - 22:19

WaypointCharlie

Link Posted 29/11/2015 - 10:58
JohnX wrote:
davidwozhere wrote:
I carry a push-on plastic lens cap with me and simply plop it over the eyecup - job done!

Another great tip, although I confess I never bother to cover the eyepiece and can't say I've experienced any dodgy exposures as a consequence.

What size lens cap is it please?

That's an excellent tip. Could someone point me in the direction of a suitable plastic lens cap?

I've found covering the viewfinder is essential for shots of more than a few seconds. It's not a problem with fooling the meter (I'll nearly always be using manual settings for control of long exposures) but there's a loss of contrast and spurious streaks can show up on the sensor. (To see the effect, try a shining a torch at the viewfinder during a 30 sec exposure). Whist I'm getting more methodical, too often I still forget to cover the viewfinder until I'm halfway through that award winning shot!
Last Edited by WaypointCharlie on 29/11/2015 - 11:02

womble

Link Posted 29/11/2015 - 13:34
WaypointCharlie wrote:
JohnX wrote:
Quote:
I carry a push-on plastic lens cap with me and simply plop it over the eyecup - job done!

Another great tip, although I confess I never bother to cover the eyepiece and can't say I've experienced any dodgy exposures as a consequence.

What size lens cap is it please?

That's an excellent tip. Could someone point me in the direction of a suitable plastic lens cap?

I've found covering the viewfinder is essential for shots of more than a few seconds. It's not a problem with fooling the meter (I'll nearly always be using manual settings for control of long exposures) but there's a loss of contrast and spurious streaks can show up on the sensor. (To see the effect, try a shining a torch at the viewfinder during a 30 sec exposure). Whist I'm getting more methodical, too often I still forget to cover the viewfinder until I'm halfway through that award winning shot!

The "light through the viewfinder" problem goes all the way back to the ES, which is why the ESII has two automatic exposure mode settings, the second one puts a blind across the viewfinder. I got round this with my ME Super by shooting in manual. Of course, the mighty LX with its "off the film" metering doesn't suffer that problem.

K.
Kris Lockyear
It is an illusion that photos are made with the camera… they are made with the eye, heart and head. Henri Cartier-Bresson
Lots of film bodies, a couple of digital ones, too many lenses (mainly older glass) and a Horseman LE 5x4.

My website

WaypointCharlie

Link Posted 29/11/2015 - 13:44
womble wrote:

The "light through the viewfinder" problem goes all the way back to the ES, which is why the ESII has two automatic exposure mode settings, the second one puts a blind across the viewfinder. I got round this with my ME Super by shooting in manual. Of course, the mighty LX with its "off the film" metering doesn't suffer that problem.

K.

Shooting in manual I'm not bothered about light through the viewfinder affecting the meter reading. It's the light through the viewfinder getting on to the sensor that I find the problem, on the K5 at least. Shooting in manual doesn't overcome that.

womble

Link Posted 29/11/2015 - 15:00
Not a problem I have ever heard of. K.
Kris Lockyear
It is an illusion that photos are made with the camera… they are made with the eye, heart and head. Henri Cartier-Bresson
Lots of film bodies, a couple of digital ones, too many lenses (mainly older glass) and a Horseman LE 5x4.

My website

autumnlight

Link Posted 29/11/2015 - 15:39
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