Yorkshire Dales '16


paulyrichard

Link Posted 16/10/2016 - 15:43
Taken whilst out walking yesterday (15/10), just outside of Kettlewell.
These two images form part of a project of mine in documenting the lie of the land so to speak, in all it's forms, lines, shapes and contours. If anything more can be said, then those dry stone walls know no bounds, all but for a town or a city.







Whernside Pasture - Yorkshire Dales, West Yorkshire '16
Pentax K3II w/ HD DA 16-85mm







West Scale Park - Yorkshire Dales, West Yorkshire '16
Pentax K3II w/ HD DA 16-85mm
"Ifamericatoldthetruthforjustonedayitswholeworldwouldfallapart "
"All the technique in the world doesn’t compensate for the inability to notice." - Elliott Erwitt

http://paulyrichard.wordpress.com/
Last Edited by paulyrichard on 16/10/2016 - 15:46

LennyBloke

Link Posted 16/10/2016 - 15:55
Great images, I think your processing really suits them
LennyBloke

paulyrichard

Link Posted 16/10/2016 - 21:52
Thanks, Lenny.
"Ifamericatoldthetruthforjustonedayitswholeworldwouldfallapart "
"All the technique in the world doesn’t compensate for the inability to notice." - Elliott Erwitt

http://paulyrichard.wordpress.com/

alfpics

Link Posted 19/10/2016 - 11:00
LennyBloke wrote:
Great images, I think your processing really suits them

I think so too - its a wonderful area up the hills fro Kettlelwell
Andy

paulyrichard

Link Posted 19/10/2016 - 16:33
Thanks, Andy. It's also a nice place to visit at this time of year, especially with the low-angled, sunlight we now have.
"Ifamericatoldthetruthforjustonedayitswholeworldwouldfallapart "
"All the technique in the world doesn’t compensate for the inability to notice." - Elliott Erwitt

http://paulyrichard.wordpress.com/

Northgrain

Link Posted 19/10/2016 - 22:22
Top stuff. Love them in mono
Tim

Some of my vaguely better stuff

davidwozhere

Link Posted 20/10/2016 - 00:48
That first one really brings out the determination of those hardy souls that built those walls. Straight up, straight over and on ...........
I never cease to boggle at their work, especially when it's there in front of me.
Both the *istDS and the K5 are incurably addicted to old glass

My page on Photocrowd - link

bwlchmawr

Link Posted 20/10/2016 - 08:02
Lovely area, I must get back up there again one day. Interesting shots. The low contrast processing is unusual, as is the composition.
Best wishes,

Andrew

"These places mean something and it's the job of a photographer to figure-out what the hell it is."
Robert Adams
"The camera doesn't make a bit of difference.  All of them can record what you are seeing.  But, you have to SEE."
Ernst Hass
My website: http://www.ephotozine.com/user/bwlchmawr-199050 http://s927.photobucket.com/home/ADC3440/index
https://www.flickr.com/photos/78898196@N05

thingsthatihaveseen

Link Posted 20/10/2016 - 09:33
Really like these... particularly how you've gone after the graphic nature of the compositions... there's a sense of journey here...

Best
Bill

BillWardPhotography
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paulyrichard

Link Posted 20/10/2016 - 10:20
Thanks, everyone...

David, While hedgerows are most common in the lowlands, the south; it's mainly in the highlands and uplands where dry-stone walling is mostly found, I notice.

Dry-stone walls are not merely features of agricultural interest though; they are in a sense, living history really; a legacy of the movement towards enclosure of common farming and the grazing of the land as English society moved away from feudalism.
As individual landowners abandoned farming in favour of raising sheep and cattle, they enclosed the land which had been owned or used "in common", by all the inhabitants of a village. The right to use the common land was lost as landowners enclosed fields and, in some cases, evicted villagers to make room for sheep!
The dry-stone walling at higher elevations are mainly for enclosing sheep, and these walls are the most regular and may run for many miles across an otherwise vast and forbidding landscape, no matter the contours involved.

I personally think dry-stone walling is a remarkable feat of engineering, admittedly there are rocky outcroppings within the landscape where the rocks can be accessed and gathered (although, not always the case), but the sheer amount of work, time and effort that must have went into achieving this feat amazes me.

Andrew, I try to keep a balance with those mid-tones and I like to preserve them. I used to try and give a hi-contrast look to a lot of my images in the past but now I choose not to.

Bill, thanks for your insight, i'm grateful you mentioned the sense of there being a journey. I never did look at them that way, but it's true. It reminds me of a quote by Fay Godwin - "The viewer must bring their own view to a photograph."
"Ifamericatoldthetruthforjustonedayitswholeworldwouldfallapart "
"All the technique in the world doesn’t compensate for the inability to notice." - Elliott Erwitt

http://paulyrichard.wordpress.com/
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