Super Moon


redbusa99

Link Posted 05/08/2014 - 12:24
a "Super Moon" is on for this weekend (10th),supposedly better than June as the moon is coser this time. hope some of you get a clear look at it.
K3 II and the odd lens or 2

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richandfleur

Link Posted 05/08/2014 - 20:40
Thanks for the heads up.

McGregNi

Link Posted 05/08/2014 - 21:09
Or is that heads down for you? Richard, just a point, from the position at which you would be seeing it I think you might have to invert the camera - either by twisting your wrists uncomfortably or perhaps more easily with a KAF (Lunar-Type) inverter adaptor, in order to avoid a vertigo sensory effect while taking the shots.
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Last Edited by McGregNi on 05/08/2014 - 21:10

Blythman

Link Posted 05/08/2014 - 21:12
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't know what the deal is. The moon will look a tiny bit bigger than usual. Again as usual, if you happen to see it low in the sky with some foreground interest, then it can appear larger than when it is higher in the sky.

If there is anything special, then that will be at the coast where the tides will be higher and lower than for a normal full moon
Alan


PPG
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McGregNi

Link Posted 05/08/2014 - 21:16
I think the special position of the moon on that night might rule out coastal shots with the 560mm in that case then Alan - you may be forced inland in order to get the whole moon in the frame.
My Guides to the Pentax Digital Camera Flash Lighting System : Download here from the PentaxForums Homepage Article .... link
Pentax K7 with BG-4 Grip / Samyang 14mm f2.8 ED AS IF UMC / DA18-55mm f3.5-5.6 AL WR / SMC A28mm f2.8 / D FA 28-105mm / SMC F35-70 f3.5-4.5 / SMC A50mm f1.7 / Tamron AF70-300mm f4-5.6 Di LD macro / SMC M75-150mm f4.0 / Tamron Adaptall (CT-135) 135mm f2.8 / Asahi Takumar-A 2X tele-converter / Pentax AF-540FGZ (I & II) Flashes / Cactus RF60/X Flashes & V6/V6II Transceiver
Last Edited by McGregNi on 05/08/2014 - 21:16

mille19

Link Posted 05/08/2014 - 21:19
Blythman wrote:
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't know what the deal is. The moon will look a tiny bit bigger than usual.

I think a perigree moon (supermoon) can appear about 15% larger than normal.

Blythman

Link Posted 05/08/2014 - 21:30
mille19 wrote:
Blythman wrote:
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't know what the deal is. The moon will look a tiny bit bigger than usual.

I think a perigree moon (supermoon) can appear about 15% larger than normal.

So does that mean you can use a 435mm lens where you'd normally use a 500mm lens. Alternatively crop a little less

Don't think I'll lose sleep if its cloudy
Alan


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Gwyn

Link Posted 05/08/2014 - 21:37
It is the second of three super moons this summer, the third being September 8th, and probably the biggest of the three, since it is the closest to earth

The moon will reach perigee at 17.44 UTC (GMT to you!), 26 minutes before it reaches full.

The difference in size of a moon at perigee is 14% larger than at apogee. Not a huge difference really. The moon only appears larger at the horizon due to the moon illusion or Ponzo effect.

The moon reaches perigee and apogee every month, though the actual distances vary slightly per month, and don't always occur at, or near to full. Perigee affects the tides - causing spring tides.

It's probably a more interesting moon to photograph the moon the day before full, when it is waxing gibbous, rather than the day it is full and at perigee, preferably with some landscape detail.

Here ended the lunacy lesson .

alfpics

Link Posted 05/08/2014 - 22:22
Thank you for the insights Gwyn!
Andy

davidstorm

Link Posted 05/08/2014 - 23:23
I'm with Alan on this one, I just can't get excited about pictures of the moon, whether perigree or waxing gibbous! Until tonight I had no idea what either of these things mean.

Regards
David
My Website http://imagesbydavidstorm.foliopic.com

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Some cameras, some lenses, some bits 'n' bobs

K10D

Link Posted 05/08/2014 - 23:53
I'll be on the lookout for Lycans. There can be no better time to try to photograph them. Obviously a risky business so probably better to use a super telephoto.

Some say even a man who is pure in heart and says his prayers by night, may become a wolf when the wolfbane blooms and the moon is bright.

As I'll be in Whitby, I'll also lookout for the odd vamp. I have heard the some of the locals react quite strangely to such moons.

Best beware.......
cameradextrous _ Motorcycles etc. link

richandfleur

Link Posted 06/08/2014 - 02:58
McGregNi wrote:
Or is that heads down for you? Richard, just a point, from the position at which you would be seeing it I think you might have to invert the camera - either by twisting your wrists uncomfortably or perhaps more easily with a KAF (Lunar-Type) inverter adaptor, in order to avoid a vertigo sensory effect while taking the shots.

Ctrl+Alt+Down Arrow should fix this for you in you're on windows 7 or similar...

petrochemist

Link Posted 06/08/2014 - 09:15
Gwyn wrote:
The moon reaches perigee and apogee every month, though the actual distances vary slightly per month, and don't always occur at, or near to full. Perigee affects the tides - causing spring tides.

Spring tides are due to the addition of both solar tides & lunar tides i.e. The gravitation bulge caused by the sun adding to that caused by the moon. You'll find they always occur at full moons & new moons, when the sun is in line with the moon, which strongly suggests the distance of the moon is not the controlling factor for this phenomena!

There is however a 'Proxigean spring tide' which is a particularly high spring tide when the moon is at perigee. These occur roughly every 1 years, though of course some are significantly bigger than others. Apparently the extreme ones are about every 30 years.
Mike
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Pentax:K7, K100D, DA18-55, DA10-17, DA55-300, DA50-200, F100-300, F50, DA35 AL, 4* M50, 2* M135, Helicoid extension, Tak 300 f4 (& 6 film bodies)
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Last Edited by petrochemist on 06/08/2014 - 09:31

fritzthedog

Link Posted 06/08/2014 - 11:30
davidstorm wrote:
I'm with Alan on this one, I just can't get excited about pictures of the moon, whether perigree or waxing gibbous! Until tonight I had no idea what either of these things mean.

Regards
David

.

+1

...and misread the last bit initially - could not understand why anybody would want to wax a gibbon - although that could be an unusual photo opportunity

Carl
No matter how many lenses I have owned - I have always needed just one more
Last Edited by fritzthedog on 06/08/2014 - 11:31

myles

Link Posted 06/08/2014 - 12:04
Gwyn definitely got the last line of her post above right - this whole thread is a lesson in lunacy!

Myles
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