pentax k-r Disappointed


tickover

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 16:18
Hi Gents
Very disappointed with my K-r results. Names Terry [78yrs].Have been using this camera for about 6 months now mostly on Auto or P as I have very little knowledge of the other modes , and I am very disappointed at the results I get, compared to my Canon Powershot G9 which are brilliant ,could i be missing something with the K-r in the set up or is it just not up to the task please, all the photos seem mundane and devoid of colour , nothing stands out to think " that was good " as on the G9,before I make a decision on trading in for a Nikon or Canon, which 90% seem to go for, is there something I can try please ,any info much appreciated Kindest Regards Terry

Gamka

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 16:39
Some images showing the problem could be useful. Either add them to the thread or a link to a Photobucket or similar site.

Once we can see the images, some suggestions could follow.

AndrewA

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 16:55
Hi Terry, I used a KR for over a year and after some initial reservations, which were really down to me not knowing the camera and the settings, I came to love it.

As Gamka said, share some of your images so we can see what you mean.

These are a couple of shots taken with my Kr:






I am not a big post processer of my images so these will have only had exposure and levels tweaks.

I can't recall who it was, but someone one the forum said to me once "Shoot in RAW, stay out of auto and P and keep the ISO settings low if in auto (100 -800 max)".

Good luck!
Andrew

"I'm here because the whiskey is free" - Tyla

PPG link
Flickr link

JAK

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 16:58
While not necessarily the best way of setting the exposures, the K-r has what they call a 'Scene' mode (SCN)

With that you can set the camera to the type of subject you are photographing, yet it is still a form of Auto.

What happens, the camera sets things like the contrast, colour, brightness to what it considers appropriate rather than let you do it yourself as it does in P mode. On auto, all the camera is doing is making a best guess but it really does not know whether you are photographing a rose in the garden, a sunset, fireworks or a splendid landscape so it might be worth trying that and set it appropriately.

You should have had with the camera a program on CD to edit the photographs and that would let you fiddle with the picture and allow you to get the picture how you would like it.

Basically the K-r is a far more versatile camera than your Canon but it does take a bit more effort to get the best results from it.

As said previously, you can upload any problem pictures and I'm sure you will get some suggestions to help you.

If you can get to understand Av (aperture Priority) and Tv (shutter priority) and the ISO setting (same as ASA on a film camera, ie sensitivity) you can begin to take charge of the results.

John K
John K
Last Edited by JAK on 04/07/2013 - 16:59

johnriley

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 17:01
A DSLR is intended to produce images that will be dealt with in Photoshop. A compact camera is more exaggerated and "print ready" - a generalisation but this could be the source of the problem. Changing to another DSLR won't help the problem.

You can tweak the settings of the K-r to increase vibrance and sharpness if that's what you wish. There is a "vivid" setting that may be just the ticket.
Best regards, John

tickover

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 18:09
Gentlemen
Many many thanks for your replies to my problem ,and Andrew fantastic photos , surely I will never do that Hi. On Dartmoor this weekend and taking the K-r with the kit lens .could you give me a starting point please ie { NO Auto or Program,] use AV--set. ISO to ????,-- AF to centre focusing and what about the metering please or any other points as john mentioned Vivid.Thank you all for your helpmuch appreciated regards Terry

Whizzkiddwill

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 19:33
I have found the free videos at www.photographycourses.biz very helpfull, they might be worth a peek. I'm sure someone one here had mentioned them and that's why I know if them.

Will
Pentax K-x, DAL f3.5-5.6 18-55mm,Pentax-A 50mm f2, DAL f4-5.6 50-200mm, FG360FGZ
Last Edited by Whizzkiddwill on 04/07/2013 - 19:34

JAK

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 19:47
Good to give it a go like that, but of course there's more than one answer. But I'll try and others will no doubt add. Set the ISO to approx 200 (as a starting point.) If you want a large 'depth of field' (most things in focus) set the aperture to about f11. If you want a narrow depth of field to make something stand out against a blurred background aim for somewhere between f4 to f5.6. You'll see the results so adjust as desired!
you may want to up the ISO if photographing something moving fast to freeze it, however sometimes a blurred shot can give a better sense of movement. So you see there's never a definitive setting to use for anything.

If you wish to process the image suggest setting the camera to RAW+ (RAW plus jpeg.) If not just do a jpeg and try upping the settings. Make sure the image quality isn't set too low (I normally use the best) and the image size isn't too small; 12M should be fine unless you wish otherwise. Turn up the colour, sharpness, contrast a little. I'd experiment before you go to see what works best for you.

You'll soon get used to the settings and adjust them as required without a second thought in no time!

If you're not sure where to find the various settings, check the camera handbook.

John K
John K
Last Edited by JAK on 04/07/2013 - 19:48

fritzthedog

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 20:17
tickover wrote:
Gentlemen
Many many thanks for your replies to my problem ,and Andrew fantastic photos , surely I will never do that Hi. On Dartmoor this weekend and taking the K-r with the kit lens .could you give me a starting point please ie { NO Auto or Program,] use AV--set. ISO to ????,-- AF to centre focusing and what about the metering please or any other points as john mentioned Vivid.Thank you all for your helpmuch appreciated regards Terry

This is virtually impossible to answer as the settings will depend entirely on the light conditions, subject etc.

The Kr is a very capable and forgiving little camera and if yours is anything like mine it has a tendency to slightly under expose. So if on Dartmoor - my advice would be - set to landscape mode - take a shot - check it on the screen - if happy - stay with landscape. If not - note the settings that it has used - move to Manual and dial in the same settings and then start making small adjustments - such as increasing the exposure if too dark - check on the screen again and make further adjustments as needed. Keep the ISO as low as possible and the shutter speed as high as possible if hand held. If you mess up all the settings - go back to an auto mode - take the auto settings again and repeat.

For landscape and until your knowledge increases- I would use multi segment metering - you may also want to try linking this to the AF pont- - this is number 6 in the custom menu. Set AF to AF.S

For landscape - remember to focus about a 3rd of the way in to the shot to get the best overall sharpness of focus throughout the frame

Bottom line is - if you want a dslr to perform - you need to learn how to use it and do not be afraid of experimenting. The Kr is better than most at providing assistance to a novice and has lots of very useful features - learn how to use them and you will be amazed by what this camera can do.

The only real reason to move up from a point and shoot to a dslr is to get better quality images - but this comes at a price and that price is that you need to take control and you can only do this by understanding. The good news is that gaining that understanding is very rewarding and you will never stop learning or improving.

Good luck.

Carl
No matter how many lenses I have owned - I have always needed just one more
Last Edited by fritzthedog on 04/07/2013 - 20:19

JAK

Link Posted 05/07/2013 - 11:23
Can I just suggest the reverse point of view to the original question? Having used manual cameras before the automatic versions were born (remember the Halina 35X which is what I had in my school-days?) Everything was completely manual; setting the shutter speed, aperture, and focus. Dialling in an ASA setting would have been pointless!
One learnt some general rules to set the exposure if a meter wasn't to hand or even a dial in plastic calculator (I've still got it.)




So when the automatic cameras came along I just hated them as often it was not possible to get the picture I wanted as I could adjust nothing! For instance a backlit portrait came out as a dark silhouette and possibly out of focus. These cameras attempt to ascertain the focus point and exposure but they don't really have a clue, they're not capable of mind reading (yet!) Fine on normal shots which probably make up the majority but not for much else, i.e. that special shot that needs you to set up the camera. I've no idea as to how your G9 copes with making its own decisions, but one thing for sure - it is making them, not you.

Despite what I've said, there is undoubtedly a place for both types of cameras. If you are out and about and want to have a camera with you just in case that front page news-shot presents itself - then the compacts are convenient and will get you a picture. That's better than no picture at all. If you wish to be creative the DSLR will offer more options for you to get the result you want, only you do have to understand how to do it and that means using it and experimenting.

John K
John K

wvbarnes

Link Posted 05/07/2013 - 11:45
Hi,

regarding the original post. I went from a Konica Minolta A200 bridge camera to the Canon G9. The small sensors meant blown skies and far too deep depth of field.The control they in theory offered therefore was limited by the sensor size and ultra wide lenses.

Pentax KX, KR and now K5 have improved my photography considerably and as JAK has covered took me back to basics. I use the excellent TAV mode to start with the exposure I want in my head. When the ISO flashes out of range I think again. A brilliant compromise between old school and auto brainless!

A pro friend has the light and compact K30 for personal use and loves it, nearly always on manual everything as is his habit!

Pentaxophile

Link Posted 05/07/2013 - 12:24
tickover wrote:
Gentlemen
Many many thanks for your replies to my problem ,and Andrew fantastic photos , surely I will never do that Hi. On Dartmoor this weekend and taking the K-r with the kit lens .could you give me a starting point please ie { NO Auto or Program,] use AV--set. ISO to ????,-- AF to centre focusing and what about the metering please or any other points as john mentioned Vivid.Thank you all for your helpmuch appreciated regards Terry

In Av mode, set ISO to 200 and aperture to f8. This will ensure good lens performance and depth of focus for landscapes. If the shutter speed drops below 1/30 you can raise the ISO.

AF centre point. Angle the camera so the thing you want in focus is central, focus, and then recompose with the shutter button held halfway down to maintain the focus.

I tend to use metering set to centre weighted. Check the results on the back of the screen and add exposure compensation if needed.

Shoot RAW+Jpeg so that shots can be rescued in Photoshop etc if needed. For bright, poppy out-of-camera jpegs, use the 'Vibrant' setting.

This all seems like a lot if you are used to a point-and-shoot camera. But it will soon be second nature! In the interim, you could just try using the 'Landscape' scene mode and changing the camera setting to 'vibrant'.
[link=https://500px.com/will_brealey/[/link]

Pentaxophile

Link Posted 05/07/2013 - 12:54
Terry - your shot on the gallery looks good, so you're clearly doing something right!

A lot of this comes down to the right kind of light, rather than the camera.
[link=https://500px.com/will_brealey/[/link]

JAK

Link Posted 05/07/2013 - 14:37
Pentaxophile wrote:
Terry - your shot on the gallery looks good, so you're clearly doing something right!

A lot of this comes down to the right kind of light, rather than the camera.

I'd agree with that.

John K
John K

MrB

Link Posted 05/07/2013 - 14:39
Terry,

You have lots of good advice here but I will add some more/different points anyway -

Before you start again, you might like to restore the camera to its default settings - see pages 310-311 in your User Manual for how to do this. (The default settings are listed on pages 304 to 309.)

If I'm guessing right, you would like to get the best pictures you can straight from the camera, with little or no processing on the computer? I'm also going to assume that you view your images on a computer screen or TV and print no bigger than A4?

If so, leave the default settings mostly alone - this will give Biggest and Best quality Jpeg Files, Auto ISO, Auto White Balance, and Bright Custom Image. Just change the focus to Centre Focus Point.

Set the Mode Dial to Av (Aperture Priority), choose the aperture to get the best from your lens, or to change the depth of field, and, if the resulting image is too dark or bright, use the exposure compensation button and shoot the scene again - all as described in other posts above.

Keep in mind that you can help the shake reduction system by keeping the shutter speed faster than 1/30 at 18mm and faster than 1/60 at 55mm.

This should give you pretty good images from the camera, and there are many free editing programs that allow you to do simple tweaks to them on the computer (e.g. brightness and sharpness), if necessary.

Something else you might consider is to include your location in your member details in this forum - there could be another member nearby who might be willing and able to give you some practical help.

Philip

Evening on the Grand Union Canal (Pentax K-r):



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