New TV Programme


Utopia Poppy

Link Posted 14/09/2010 - 22:57
Wow, you really were waiting for someone to say that - that was a quick reply!!
"Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep". ~Scott Adams

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fatspider

Link Posted 14/09/2010 - 23:02
Quote:
that's where I've been going wrong with the rule of thirds all these years - no bookcase in the background

Oh come on Fiona, everyone knows you should carry a bookcase around just in case

Programmes like that are not for people like us anyway, there aimed at joe public whos intrest in photography has been limited to taking shots of family and friends with cut off heads and fingers over the lens, hence the lack of instruction re-metering for the light through the window, they dont want to blind you with technicalities and hope the camera will get it right
My Names Alan, and I'm a lensaholic.
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petrochemist

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 06:48
Utopia Poppy wrote:
No mention of light metering at all

Actually there was but you had to be quick to catch it!
The comment was something like 'meter for the highlights'

Mike
Mike
.
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Utopia Poppy

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 07:27
Quote:
Programmes like that are not for people like us anyway, there aimed at joe public whos intrest in photography has been limited to taking shots of family and friends with cut off heads and fingers over the lens, hence the lack of instruction re-metering for the light through the window, they dont want to blind you with technicalities and hope the camera will get it right

Well, that's why I was surprised that the first two tips from the professional weren't "get the person's head in the shot" and "oh, don't put your finger over the lens"! Somehow I don't think I'll be learning much from this series!
"Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep". ~Scott Adams

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gartmore

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 08:19
Well I have to say I thought it was excellent, pitched at exactly the right level.

Never has so much good advice been given to so many by so few.
Ken
“We must avoid however, snapping away, shooting quickly and without thought, overloading ourselves with unnecessary images that clutter our memory and diminish the clarity of the whole.” - Henri Cartier-Bresson -

flossie

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 08:35
I've put a series link on so can watch the whole lot at one go when got some time.

As for the viewfinder comment - I have noticed its an age thing, having recently paid more attention at work to how "pro" (i.e. "being paid for it") photographers behave, and anyone under the age of about 25 only uses Live View with the camera held at arms-length, even with oversize Canon monsters. Presumably its what they grew up with...
Still shooting in the dark (literally and metaphorically)...

gartmore

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 09:31
I think there is more to it, as you get older your eyesight deteriotrates, I really can't be bothered getting my reading glasses out to look at the back of the camera and therefore can't be bothered with cameras without viewfinders. If I do put my specs on to look at the back I then can't see the subject.

Younger people, of course, have been brought up with viewfinderless cameras like phones.

At any rate you get less shake with your face squashed against the camera.
Ken
“We must avoid however, snapping away, shooting quickly and without thought, overloading ourselves with unnecessary images that clutter our memory and diminish the clarity of the whole.” - Henri Cartier-Bresson -

Dangermouse

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 11:29
I also thought it showed something I've come to realise of late - there is no single technique which makes a good photo. Some of the genuinely stunning photos of historical moments are technically awful, but still manage to get the atmosphere across perfectly.

They tell you how their tame pros take photos. Now, I know an experienced pro who to me has some odd ideas about photography - he seems to teach that shutter speed is the most important thing whereas I've always worked on the principle that aperture is everything with shutter speed following on to get the exposure right. Evidently it works for him just as f8 and a shutter speed to suit works for me in most outdoor situations. I've also found people shooting at f2.8 all the time just because the lens can do it - again, seriously odd to me as I only go up there if the light is rubbish!

The most useful advice I can give anyone with a new camera is to get out there and play with it. Also look at online image galleries and when you see a shot you like read the EXIF data tab to see what settings they used. Once you've got depth of field understood then you're technically capable of taking genuinely stunning pictures, you just need to find the compositions.
Matt

Shooting the Welsh Wilderness with K-m, KX, MX, ME Super and assorted lenses.

TOZZA27

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 14:44


I`m with Gareth all the way - only clicked over `cos Joclick spotted it !

Very patronising and rather boring - I`ve seen better advice on The One Show or BBC Look North.........................

Tony
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thoughton

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 16:19
cardiff_gareth wrote:
Here is the link to the site:

http://www3.five.tv/stunning_pictures/episode-1-contributor-gallery

Take a look at them stunning pictures

Gotta agree there Gareth Without the interesting models all of those shots would be awful. As it is they are rescued from mediocrity by tutus, habits and prosthetic legs, not by good lighting or composition.
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Blythman

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 16:35
The best pic was the one in Iraq
Alan


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hkwiles

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 18:18
cardiff_gareth wrote:
Sorry, just seen this thread after commenting on the one in the general section. What a load of tosh Them pictures in my eyes were all terrible, uber distracting backgrounds as it looked like they had stopped the lens right down to maximise DOF, just what you want when shooting portraits. I mean come on, a bookcase, a street scene, that park bench and the umberella etc etc
If thats taking amazing pictures I feel like we're all safe

I think you might be being a little too harsh....if I remeber rightly the challenge was to also show "where they had come from" namely they were both leaving the teaching profession to persue other careers. So not a conventional portrait per se.

Howard
Body: K7 of course !!
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Pentaxophile

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 18:41
I like the shot of the guy on the bench, and holding the icecream in front of St Pauls! Kind of 'snapshot' style, but that's ok with me.
[link=https://500px.com/will_brealey/[/link]

andrewk

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 21:35
I watched the first 10 mins or so and then fell asleep - missed the rest.

Maybe I need some strong black coffee for next week's rivetting installment ....

Andrew
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hkwiles

Link Posted 15/09/2010 - 21:59
cardiff_gareth wrote:
hkwiles wrote:
Quote:
Sorry, just seen this thread after commenting on the one in the general section. What a load of tosh Them pictures in my eyes were all terrible, uber distracting backgrounds as it looked like they had stopped the lens right down to maximise DOF, just what you want when shooting portraits. I mean come on, a bookcase, a street scene, that park bench and the umberella etc etc
If thats taking amazing pictures I feel like we're all safe

I think you might be being a little too harsh....if I remeber rightly the challenge was to also show "where they had come from" namely they were both leaving the teaching profession to persue other careers. So not a conventional portrait per se.

Howard

True, maybe it does show where they came from to where they are now but the way the 'pro' bigged them images up etc on the show was dyre. Still, good for a laugh I suppose
There was no feedback on making them better, only saying how good they were when clearly they are shizer

I agree entirely, the photos were, by and large terrible, especially the one taken at the ice cream van . Hopefully it was just a basic intro to the series and that it may get a little more technical, not holding my hopes out though. Next week is landscapes I think be interesting to see what "gems" are produced in that episode.

Howard
Body: K7 of course !!
Lenses: DA18-55WR,DA50-200WR,FA50-1.4
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