Nature and the DA*300


AndrewH

Link Posted 01/08/2018 - 14:34
Having invested in the DA*300 I have been delighted with the results it can achieve coupled with my K5iiS. I spent some time in Norfolk recently spotting insects and largely butterflies and trying to get the best out of the lens. Not sure if I achieved that, but I was really pleased (again!) with the photos and the level of detail the lens captures. A few to browse below - more on Flickr here

1. Small skipper



2. Buff-tailed bumblebee



3. Honeybee



4. Peacock



5. Comma



6. Linnet



7. Tree Sparrow



8. Bee on bramble



The only 'editing' is that the images have been resized (using the scale function in Photoshop) allowing a little recomposition too. Apart from that these are straight out of the camera. This single lens inspires me to get outside and take photos like no other. Recent acquisition of the x1.4 HD Teleconverter will only reinforce this I think! C&C welcome as always
flickr

LennyBloke

Link Posted 01/08/2018 - 15:09
That's a great combination (K5iis + DA*300) and the close focus allows excellent pseudo-macro shots. Your images look even better over on Flickr - Particularly like "Norfolk Grasses"!

I did notice an odd one or two of your shots seemed very slightly "soft", I think it may be down to the shutter speed, where it is under 1/300th (I know SR means that camera shake is more controlled - assuming you had it on). I find I have more success when I can keep the shutter speed above the focal length of the lens. Not a criticism, just an observation
LennyBloke

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AndrewH

Link Posted 01/08/2018 - 15:15
Exactly the sort of feedback that is welcome & needed.. Some did appear sharper than others, with real 'pop' - will concentrate on that when out again (soon!). Thank you!
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johnriley

Link Posted 01/08/2018 - 16:31
Nice shots! Thinking about sharpness, SR will enable slower shutter speeds if we are looking at camera shake, but won't help at all with subject movement. Birds and insects move quite a bit and need high shutter speeds.
Best regards, John

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AndrewH

Link Posted 01/08/2018 - 17:45
Thank you, John!
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Snappyhoffy

Link Posted 01/08/2018 - 23:21
johnriley wrote:
Nice shots! Thinking about sharpness, SR will enable slower shutter speeds if we are looking at camera shake, but won't help at all with subject movement. Birds and insects move quite a bit and need high shutter speeds.

Thanks John. So obvious but I get carried away with the technology and forget the basics. I too will continue to develop the love with the DA*300. It is worth the effort that's for sure.
'Life looks simple through a viewfinder'.....then I went Digital!
Keith
K3, DA* 16-50, DA* 50-135, DA* 300, AF360

Blythman

Link Posted 02/08/2018 - 11:54
johnriley wrote:
Nice shots! Thinking about sharpness, SR will enable slower shutter speeds if we are looking at camera shake, but won't help at all with subject movement. Birds and insects move quite a bit and need high shutter speeds.

Not strictly true all of the time. Its often a case of picking the moment. Although then a good base helps as using SR can slow the camera down. Link to an old example https://flic.kr/p/hLPDXv
Alan


PPG
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davidstorm

Link Posted 02/08/2018 - 21:28
Blythman wrote:
johnriley wrote:
Nice shots! Thinking about sharpness, SR will enable slower shutter speeds if we are looking at camera shake, but won't help at all with subject movement. Birds and insects move quite a bit and need high shutter speeds.

Not strictly true all of the time. Its often a case of picking the moment. Although then a good base helps as using SR can slow the camera down. Link to an old example https://flic.kr/p/hLPDXv

I agree with Blythman on this one, it's perfectly possible to get sharp images of wildlife with a DA*300 (or other long lens) when using slow shutter speeds. You have to know when to click the shutter. Also, it helps to have some sort of camera support, not necessarily a tripod or a monopod, but if for example you are in a bird hide you can sometimes support the camera or lens on a wooden window frame. A beanbag is also a great help in some circumstances. See links for a few examples, where I've listed the shutter speed and focal length. BTW, I'm not claiming my shots are good, just illustrating they are sharp at slow speeds.

1/160, 420mm (DA*300 + 1.4TC)
link

1/200, 300mm (not DA*300)
link

1/100, 420mm (DA*300 + 1.4TC)
link

1/100, 420mm (DA*300 + 1.4TC)
link

Regards
David
My Website http://imagesbydavidstorm.foliopic.com

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Some cameras, some lenses, some bits 'n' bobs
Last Edited by davidstorm on 02/08/2018 - 21:29

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