Finches at Fairburn


jvs

Link Posted 26/02/2012 - 21:46
Hope you like these - goldfinch, greenfinch and bullfinch, all with K-5 and DA* 300
All criticism taken in the spirit it's meant in!
1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


10



And finally, I couldn't resist this one - so nearly perfect! I know, if it's not, it's not so is it worth anything? If only the head had been in focus like the foot is! It was my first shot of the day, so hadn't got warmed up - that's my excuse!
11


John

Jumbo48

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 09:43
Lovely set, and so nice to see a Bullfinch, how did you manage to get so close to them?
Regards John/Jumbo

pentax

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 11:30
Great shots of birds, did you use tripod or are they hand held. Depending where you live in Huddersfield why not pop in to Holmfirth camera cluband see what we do or check out our website, you would be most wellcome.
Regards
Derek
Last Edited by pentax on 27/02/2012 - 11:40

jvs

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 17:20
Glad you like them - thanks. There was a feeding station just out of shot and some of the crops are fairly heavy, but I was really pleased with the way they turned out as I'm only just getting used to the camera. I have a couple of totally different sets that I'm going to post this evening hopefully and I'll be glad of comments on them.

Derek, I've thought about the camera club in the past but have always shied away. I'd be grateful for a few tips as to what goes on and what to turn up with etc just to give me a push. How could I contact you?

Thanks again
John
Last Edited by jvs on 27/02/2012 - 17:20

Frogfish

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 18:00
This is a really nice set .... and I love the bullfinch !

However if I may say, these seem a little soft for the DA*300 and K5 and that surprises me. I'd be looking for the sort of detail (and more) shown in #6 - the Greenfinch. Are you stabilising your lens on a tripod/monopod ?

BTW are you shooting in RAW ? If not then for birding you absolutely should, it would bring out so much more detail.
http://frogfish.smugmug.com/ Pentax. Pentax DA*300/4, Cosina 55/1.2, Lens Baby Composer Pro & Edge 80, AFA x1.7, Metz 50 af1.
Nikon. D800. D600. Sigma 500/4.5, Nikon 300/2.8 VRII, Sigma 120-300/2.8, Zeiss Distagon ZF2 21/2.8, Zeiss Distagon ZF2 35/2.0, Sigma 50/1.4, Nikkor 85/1.8, Nikon TC20EIII, Nikon TC14EII, Kenko x1.4, Sigma 2.0
Last Edited by Frogfish on 27/02/2012 - 18:02

RCA

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 18:28
Very pretty shots, colours are excellent but easy on the eye (as in natural), the last is fab even tho not perfect - I would have kept it too.

Clare

George Lazarette

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 18:29
Frogfish wrote:
This is a really nice set .... and I love the bullfinch !

However if I may say, these seem a little soft for the DA*300 and K5 and that surprises me. I'd be looking for the sort of detail (and more) shown in #6 - the Greenfinch. Are you stabilising your lens on a tripod/monopod ?

BTW are you shooting in RAW ? If not then for birding you absolutely should, it would bring out so much more detail.

Hmmm. If the picture is properly exposed to start with, and no subsequent adjustment is made to exposure in the computer, then I don't think RAW is going to add any more detail.

But I concur that using RAW is good advice. When you don't get the exposure right first time, then RAW will be very helpful.

G
Keywords: Charming, polite, and generally agreeable.

jvs

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 18:52
Thank you all for your comments! First, my limited experience of serious photography still makes it hard to judge sharpness at times - what looks reasonably sharp to me and my eyes sometimes needs a direct comparison with a better shot to show me what real sharpness is. While being quite pleased with this set, I can see nevertheless that they could be sharper; second, to answer the first question, all bar the bullfinch were taken resting the camera on my hand on the lip of a hide window - haven't as yet got a bean bag; the bullfinch was handheld, crouched down and very uncomfortable - didn't have my stool or tripod with me! So lucky to get anything anywhere near sharp, I suppose. Finally, I tend to go for RAW + JPEG setting at the moment, but I'm beginning to think that takes too long to write to the card, so am undecided about what to do - any advice seriously considered!
If anyone would care to look at a couple of other posts later, I'd love your views on those.
Thanks again,
John

Stuey

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 21:13
I like these
K10D, K5 plus plenty of clueless enthusiasm.

My Flickr site link

Frogfish

Link Posted 28/02/2012 - 07:18
George Lazarette wrote:
[quote:3496ace15f="Frogfish"]

Hmmm. If the picture is properly exposed to start with, and no subsequent adjustment is made to exposure in the computer, then I don't think RAW is going to add any more detail.

But I concur that using RAW is good advice. When you don't get the exposure right first time, then RAW will be very helpful.

G

I have found there is a huge difference in the DR when shooting RAW over even the highest Jpg settings and this becomes critical when shooting e.g. backlit birds or those in bushes (in many cases there is often no choice as the birds won't oblige with their choice of branch !). It's often the difference between a keeper and trashing the shot. Of course I also advise using spot metering for the bird .... in which case RAW is often then critical to recover the background.
http://frogfish.smugmug.com/ Pentax. Pentax DA*300/4, Cosina 55/1.2, Lens Baby Composer Pro & Edge 80, AFA x1.7, Metz 50 af1.
Nikon. D800. D600. Sigma 500/4.5, Nikon 300/2.8 VRII, Sigma 120-300/2.8, Zeiss Distagon ZF2 21/2.8, Zeiss Distagon ZF2 35/2.0, Sigma 50/1.4, Nikkor 85/1.8, Nikon TC20EIII, Nikon TC14EII, Kenko x1.4, Sigma 2.0
Last Edited by Frogfish on 28/02/2012 - 07:19

Frogfish

Link Posted 28/02/2012 - 07:23
jvs wrote:
Thank you all for your comments! First, my limited experience of serious photography still makes it hard to judge sharpness at times - what looks reasonably sharp to me and my eyes sometimes needs a direct comparison with a better shot to show me what real sharpness is. While being quite pleased with this set, I can see nevertheless that they could be sharper; second, to answer the first question, all bar the bullfinch were taken resting the camera on my hand on the lip of a hide window - haven't as yet got a bean bag; the bullfinch was handheld, crouched down and very uncomfortable - didn't have my stool or tripod with me! So lucky to get anything anywhere near sharp, I suppose. Finally, I tend to go for RAW + JPEG setting at the moment, but I'm beginning to think that takes too long to write to the card, so am undecided about what to do - any advice seriously considered!
If anyone would care to look at a couple of other posts later, I'd love your views on those.
Thanks again,

Hi John ..... see my post above on my views re. RAW. Unless you are firing off series bursts then the write time is not an issue at all. In PP you can set up presets but in any case it doesn't slow down my workflow in the slightest (this may vary depending on which software you are using .. I use Aperture 3).

I would strongly advise that a) in a blind you have the camera mounted to a tripod with a good ball-head and b) that in walking/stalking you use a very good monopod, when you can plant it then it will improve the shot and even if you don't have time for that the extra weight will help steady your arm.
http://frogfish.smugmug.com/ Pentax. Pentax DA*300/4, Cosina 55/1.2, Lens Baby Composer Pro & Edge 80, AFA x1.7, Metz 50 af1.
Nikon. D800. D600. Sigma 500/4.5, Nikon 300/2.8 VRII, Sigma 120-300/2.8, Zeiss Distagon ZF2 21/2.8, Zeiss Distagon ZF2 35/2.0, Sigma 50/1.4, Nikkor 85/1.8, Nikon TC20EIII, Nikon TC14EII, Kenko x1.4, Sigma 2.0
Last Edited by Frogfish on 28/02/2012 - 07:25

George Lazarette

Link Posted 28/02/2012 - 12:46
Frogfish wrote:
George Lazarette wrote:
[quote:3496ace15f="Frogfish"]

Hmmm. If the picture is properly exposed to start with, and no subsequent adjustment is made to exposure in the computer, then I don't think RAW is going to add any more detail.

But I concur that using RAW is good advice. When you don't get the exposure right first time, then RAW will be very helpful.

G

I have found there is a huge difference in the DR when shooting RAW over even the highest Jpg settings and this becomes critical when shooting e.g. backlit birds or those in bushes (in many cases there is often no choice as the birds won't oblige with their choice of branch !). It's often the difference between a keeper and trashing the shot. Of course I also advise using spot metering for the bird .... in which case RAW is often then critical to recover the background.

But I suspect you are playing with exposure during PP. If you DON'T, then I can't see how there can be any difference, bearing in mind that you end up with a JPEG anyway.

Of course, I fully agree that shooting RAW gives you far more room to manoeuvre, and is much the best way to go.

G
Keywords: Charming, polite, and generally agreeable.
Last Edited by George Lazarette on 28/02/2012 - 12:47

Blythman

Link Posted 28/02/2012 - 15:57
Realy nice set John. One thing you have to be careful with, particularly goldfinches in sunny conditions is blowing the highlights. Shooting in RAW has already been mentioned. There is a much better chance of recovering blown highlights when processing RAW as opposed to jpeg
Alan


PPG
Flickr

fatspider

Link Posted 28/02/2012 - 19:12
I thought I recognised some of those branches

The Pick Up Hide at Fairburn is an excellent place for getting close to small garden birds like this, and as you've proved you don't need anything much longer than 300mm.

As for camera clubs John you can find one here; link

Have a look at the clubs websites as most will have the coming years syllabus listed, don't worry about taking anything unless it specifically mentions a practical evening in the list of events for that evening, and there's usually no need to contact anyone first, just turn up and say hello.
My Names Alan, and I'm a lensaholic.
My PPG link
My Flckr link

jvs

Link Posted 28/02/2012 - 21:14
Thanks to all - much food for thought as usual! Alan, I've sent you a message on the back of your Bury station appearance - was it you at Fairburn last Saturday? I remember you posting a shot some time ago of a sparrow hovering next to a feeder - I thought of that when I posted the tree sparrow topic the other day.
We must meet up at Fairburn on a sunny day!
Regards,
John
Add a Comment
You must be registered or logged-in to comment.