Updating firmware


Lancer

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 15:25
Oh - the good old days, when you could get an entire program on 1 floppy disc!

andrewk

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 15:37
Sorry, yes, I forgot to mention the 5 1/4" floppy drive.
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JAK

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 17:05
Lancer wrote:
Oh - the good old days, when you could get an entire program on 1 floppy disc!

Most Microsoft products came in a box with half a dozen or more discs!

John K
John K

HowardJ

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 17:18
As a student in 1964 I learnt to write Algol60 programs (note not called software in those days!!) on an English Electric KDF9 which had 24K Bytes of memory. See here -
http://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/roger.broughton/museum/corestore/KDF9cs.htm

Ah, good old days.

Howard

Sorry to go off topic
Cymru Am Byth

Gwyn

Link Posted 04/07/2013 - 19:55
HowardJ wrote:
As a student in 1964 I learnt to write Algol60 programs (note not called software in those days!!) on an English Electric KDF9 which had 24K Bytes of memory. See here -
http://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/roger.broughton/museum/corestore/KDF9cs.htm

Ah, good old days.

Howard

Sorry to go off topic

We are strolling somewhat off topic here, but His Nibs learned to program on amongst other things the Witch/Harwell Dekatron. He also programmed PDP 8s. He controlled satellites with PDP 8s.

I was an operator on an ICL 1904 which took up a massive air conditioned room and had 96K of memory. We were thrilled when it was upgraded to 128K. The entire scientific lab where it was based, used that computer, including for processing a lot of satellite data.

petrochemist

Link Posted 05/07/2013 - 09:57
I can't quite compete with Howard. Up until 1995, for our main data processing system, we were using a Hewlett Packard 2113b (which was brought in 1979 for 30,000). It had a whole 32K due to the company spending extra for 'magic memory'.

The system worked rather well automatically correcting for gradually drifting times - something the new systems don't do! It was however quite a pain after a power cut as a series of binary numbers had to be manually loaded into the registers to get it to read the 640k tape drives & boot up.
Mike
.
Pentax:K5ii, K7, K100D, DA18-55, DA10-17, DA55-300, DA50-200, F100-300, F50, DA35 AL, 4* M50, 2* M135, Helicoid extension, Tak 300 f4 (& 6 film bodies)
3rd Party: Bigmos (Sigma 150-500mm OS HSM),2* 28mm, 100mm macro, 28-200 zoom, 35-80 zoom, 80-200 zoom, 80-210 zoom, 300mm M42, 600 mirror, 1000-4000 scope, 50mm M42, enlarger lenses, Sony & micro 4/3 cameras with various PK mounts, Zenit E...
Far to many tele-converters, adapters, project parts & extension tubes etc.

.[size=11:].Flickr WPF Panoramio
Last Edited by petrochemist on 05/07/2013 - 10:14

gwing

Link Posted 05/07/2013 - 13:52
petrochemist wrote:
I can't quite compete with Howard. Up until 1995, for our main data processing system, we were using a Hewlett Packard 2113b (which was brought in 1979 for 30,000). It had a whole 32K due to the company spending extra for 'magic memory'.

The system worked rather well automatically correcting for gradually drifting times - something the new systems don't do!

see http://doc.ntp.org/4.1.0/ntpd.htm available as standard with all Linux distributions (unless ypu find an exception that has decided to leave it out)

Quote:
It was however quite a pain after a power cut as a series of binary numbers had to be manually loaded into the registers to get it to read the 640k tape drives & boot up.

jeallen01

Link Posted 08/07/2013 - 20:03
JAK wrote:
Lancer wrote:
Oh - the good old days, when you could get an entire program on 1 floppy disc!

Most Microsoft products came in a box with half a dozen or more discs!

John K

Bought a copy of WORD 2 in about 1992 - IIRC at least a dozen discs.
AND, had been using WORDPERFECT 5.1 before (and after!) that - and that was a much easier programme to grasp.
K-3 II, K-3 and a K-70 from SRS (having now relegated the K-30 /"K-50" to a backup body), & some Sigma and Pentax lenses (and a lot of old 35mm gear!)
Last Edited by jeallen01 on 08/07/2013 - 20:04

sbrads

Link Posted 09/07/2013 - 22:24
I've still got a working forerunner of the PC, a 70's CP/M computer with 8" floppies.

andrewk

Link Posted 09/07/2013 - 23:58
Gwyn wrote:
I was an operator on an ICL 1904 which took up a massive air conditioned room and had 96K of memory.

The first program I ever wrote at college, in Fortran, ran on an ICL 1901A which, I guess, precedes the 1904. Showing my age ..........

Andrew
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Algernon

Link Posted 10/07/2013 - 08:39
I still use my Abacus!

'
Half Man... Half Pentax ... Half Cucumber

Pentax K-1 + K-5 and some other stuff

Algi

greynolds999

Link Posted 10/07/2013 - 14:24
I remember when all we had were ones and zeroes.

And some days we didn't even have any ones! You try writing a database just using zeroes

(Yet another Monty Python sketch starting)!
My Photobucket
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