Truck day Image heavy


derek897

Link Posted 06/07/2014 - 12:32
Following on from vintage day here a a few shots from truck day at Mondello Park. Access was different because of the trucks, lots of areas restricted.
Cc welcome
Derek

#1



#2



#3



#4



#5



#6



#7


I know what i like, If not always why.

Stuey

Link Posted 06/07/2014 - 13:35
Number 4 is my favourite
K10D, K5 plus plenty of clueless enthusiasm.

My Flickr site link

derek897

Link Posted 06/07/2014 - 16:37
This is another of the drifter that came on track for one lap during an interval, Not without its faults i know but thought id share it.
As always cc welcome and needed.



Derek
I know what i like, If not always why.

redbusa99

Link Posted 06/07/2014 - 17:10
all look very ,very good to me, has the back one in 3 blown it like the panning in 7
odd lens or 2

Flickr

derek897

Link Posted 06/07/2014 - 17:20
redbusa99 wrote:
all look very ,very good to me, has the back one in 3 blown it like the panning in 7

Thanks the back one in #3 is just belching out exhaust fumes, most of them did this when they were accelerating heavily.
Derek
I know what i like, If not always why.

simonarron

Link Posted 07/07/2014 - 20:46
Hi (again) Derek

In terms of composition and diversity, these look (to me) like a significant step forward. I suspected that a few areas might be out of bounds - that's invariably the way when trucks are set loose - but there are some good, dramatic images here (#3. #4 and #5, for instance).

The only note of caution I'd sound is the 'b' word - background. Look how clearly the truck in shot #7 is defined and compare it with the cluttered yonder in #2, where the truck silhouettes rather blend with the backdrop. In a situation like that, I'd be tempted to shoot wide open, to reduce the depth of field, and slow the shutter speed to about 1/60 or 1/80, in a bid to get sharp trucks set against an indistinct, colourful tapestry.

Given that previous inexperience left you with an almost vertical learning curve, you've made terrific progress.

I look forward to seeing the next episode.

Cheers,
SA

derek897

Link Posted 08/07/2014 - 14:19
Hi Simon, Thanks again for taking the time to look and give really good and genuine advice.
Yes the bloody B word again
I have to admit yet again to failing on that one yet again.
Its so easy to just follow the subject and not see whats in the background at the time. To be honest i never really thought about trying to shoot wide open but of course that would help to isolate the main focus from the dreaded background.
Seriously thank you for your ongoing help and advice, its both needed and appreciated.
I will keep trying

Thanks

Derek
I know what i like, If not always why.

derek897

Link Posted 08/07/2014 - 23:29
Just a quick question. If shooting wide open (f4) on a bright day, is it better to just increase shutter speed or adjust exposure compensation or a combo of both. ?
Derek.
I know what i like, If not always why.

carmagw

Link Posted 09/07/2014 - 09:37
Hi Derek, good set.

derek897 wrote:
If shooting wide open (f4) on a bright day, is it better to just increase shutter speed or adjust exposure compensation or a combo of both. ?
Derek.

I guess it depends on what you are trying to achieve with the shot.

Shoot at lowest ISO (i tend to shoot TAV with auto ISO so that sorts itself out)

Only increase the shutter speed significantly if you are trying to freeze the action (fine shooting something head on) , therefore may cause problems with panning where you're trying to convey the sense of movement. You may get away with some increase depending on speed of subject or if lots of water spray then freezing this can look good.

I personally wouldn't mess with exposure too much if its correct to start with otherwise you you risk blowing the detail in whites (depends on how important that part of the subject is to you), if you shoot in raw you may get a way with a bit more of an increase as you can tone it down in post processing. (check the histogram)

I've struggled panning when its been very bright as I couldn't get the shutter speed low enough for the subject I was taking, I guess a possible solution would be to use a filter (polariser or ND) to reduce the light.

Just my thoughts, others may have different ideas.

Regards

George

simonarron

Link Posted 09/07/2014 - 10:01
I'd go along with George. If you are shooting at low speeds, the panning should be enough to separate the background from the cars/trucks/bikes. That said, I crank the ISO as low as possible (as far as 80, by activating the expanded sensitivity mode in the custom menu) to keep the aperture as wide as the light will permit and reduce the depth of field as much as possible. The shot below was taken at Silverstone in bright sunshine last Friday: 1/60 at 125 ISO (thought I'd wound it down more, but clearly wasn't paying attention) resulted in f18, but in this context such details don't matter. Apologies for not being clearer in my previous post.


derek897

Link Posted 09/07/2014 - 10:08
Thanks George and Simon, that makes perfect sense, that's what i love about this site. Ask a question and get clear and very helpful answers. Thanks again guys

Derek
I know what i like, If not always why.
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