scanning film negatives


womble

Link Posted 12/02/2009 - 22:18
I do not know anything about that particular scanner, but well scanned images can be every bit a good as a traditional print from an enlarger. The main issue is that a traditional print feels quite different from a digital print, although with a growing variety of specialist B&W papers even that is less than it used to be.

I am looking forward to getting my darkroom up and running simply because it will get me away from a computer screen

Best wishes, Kris.
Kris Lockyear
It is an illusion that photos are made with the camera… they are made with the eye, heart and head. Henri Cartier-Bresson
Lots of film bodies, a couple of digital ones, too many lenses (mainly older glass) and a Horseman LE 5x4.

My website

arto

Link Posted 12/02/2009 - 22:27
You will get the best results from using a dedicated film scanner, such as the Nikon Coolscan or Konica-Minolta Dimage ScanDual IV. These have high quality negative holders that keep the film flat, and higher resolution - the difference is plain to see in side-by-side examples.

As for going the digital darkroom route, inkjet prints using specialist carbon pigment inks on Epson printers can match or even exceed the quality and stability of traditional silver prints. Ordinary inkjet black-and-white prints, though, suffer from poor D-Max, colour tints and metamerism, which causes colour shifts under different lighting conditions. Have a look here for lots of detailed info: http://www.paulroark.com/BW-Info/
www.siskinpress.co.uk

womble

Link Posted 13/02/2009 - 00:08
Very useful site, thanks for the link. Luckily, he appears to be a much better photographer than website designer....

Best wishes, Kris.
Kris Lockyear
It is an illusion that photos are made with the camera… they are made with the eye, heart and head. Henri Cartier-Bresson
Lots of film bodies, a couple of digital ones, too many lenses (mainly older glass) and a Horseman LE 5x4.

My website

Peter Elgar

Link Posted 13/02/2009 - 15:21
Get into that Darkroom and get cracking on REAL PRINTING! I was in there yesterday having a great time with my outdated B/W negs on some FREE Ilford Multigrade useing my home-made print developer -- lovely day !!!
been a member of Pentax Club since the Ron Spillman era! Got COMPUTERISED at last - DIGITISED? Taken the PLUNGE - BUT FILM STILL RULES !!!

gartmore

Link Posted 13/02/2009 - 18:44
There is quite a different look between scanned negs and scanned bromide prints. In my experience with the Minolta film scanner mentioned above grain is much more apparent. I do prefer the look of scanned prints, but the convenience of scanning negs into the computer cant be beaten. I have to say I sold all my darkroom stuff some time ago. If I want a photographic print made I pay to have it done.
Ken
“We must avoid however, snapping away, shooting quickly and without thought, overloading ourselves with unnecessary images that clutter our memory and diminish the clarity of the whole.” - Henri Cartier-Bresson -

gartmore

Link Posted 14/02/2009 - 08:59
matic wrote:
hello,

thanks to everybody for the comments, the scanner is simply a stop gap until i get to grips with the enlarger, whats it does do, is allow me to scan a negative and decide whether it is to be shortlisted for playing with in a traditional darkroom, but i was curious as to the quality between the two systems, having only ever used a scanner.

many thanks,

roger.

Most people make contact sheets in the darkroom for the purpose of evaluating images, it also gives you a handy index sheet to keep with the negs
Ken
“We must avoid however, snapping away, shooting quickly and without thought, overloading ourselves with unnecessary images that clutter our memory and diminish the clarity of the whole.” - Henri Cartier-Bresson -

arto

Link Posted 14/02/2009 - 18:01
gartmore wrote:
In my experience with the Minolta film scanner mentioned above grain is much more apparent.

It's important not to scan b&w film as b&w film - scanning as colour positive and converting in Photoshop gives much better results. I'd upload a sample image but I don't know how! (any suggestions welcome)

My point being, the digital darkroom can be the equal of the traditional chemical darkroom (with care), and prints have the archival advantage of never having been subjected to acidic and alkaline substances.
www.siskinpress.co.uk
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