Product photography set up.


davem

Link Posted 24/11/2016 - 10:30
My daughter has started selling her Jewellery online. I was thinking of helping her by taking some good photos using a table light tent set up. What is the best way to do this? I don't need the best set up ever just something to get me started.

I have seen a set up here link

Its in the sale but by the time you have added VAT and delivery the cost is getting on for 60.

I have a large light tent I got off ebay very cheap a while ago.

Any thoughts?

Dave
Last Edited by davem on 24/11/2016 - 10:35

MHOL190246

Link Posted 24/11/2016 - 14:27
As you already have a light tent, would it be better to look for a couple of desk lamps from a DIY chain such as Homebase or B & Q? Alternatively use natural light possibly with off camera fill in flash

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LennyBloke

Link Posted 24/11/2016 - 14:56
You can buy all sorts of equipment to "improve" your results - but as the previous responder says - you've got the light tent so you can experiment with lamps, torches, off camera flash (if you have one), daylight etc.

Exposure times won't be a major issue if you use a tripod (turn off "Shake Reduction" though) - Backgrounds can be cobbled together from many sources (I've used the inner lining of a coat for a deep red, silky background) - cushions, clothing, etc.

Because it's digital it's only really time that's the cost - and it's a great way to gain some experience in another area.

Have fun
LennyBloke

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chris667

Link Posted 24/11/2016 - 16:58
My other half sells jewellery. I'm not involved with the day to day photography so can't claim credit for the photos on her website, buy I did help her to get started with the setup she uses for everything.

She uses a small light tent, and two charity shop desk lamps with daylight bulbs bought from Amazon. The equipment all in cost about 35 apart from her DSLR and tripod.

The lights are outside the tent at about 40 to the piece being photographed. Backgrounds are homemade, wood painted in artist's gesso.

As stated above, exposure times are meaningless providing you have a good tripod (my Slik, purchased long before digital cameras were a thing). She sets the white balance manually, then uses the self timer for long exposures with small apertures; her camera underexposes by default so she has to dial in one and a half stops or so to get nice colours.

She has a nice little business selling online and through a growing selection of shops. I hope you will forgive the link, but it shows the pictures and I am very proud!

https://folksy.com/shops/GwinKerry

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davem

Link Posted 24/11/2016 - 20:00
That's all great advice and has given me a bit of confidence to have a play in a new area.

Thanks for the detailed reply and link Chris, much appreciated.

pentaxian450

Link Posted 25/11/2016 - 00:38
If you try using LED lighting, make sure the LED lights are full spectrum, otherwise you could end up with strange colour cast that are very difficult to correct.
Yves (another one of those crazy Canucks)

davem

Link Posted 25/11/2016 - 10:05
What lens would be suitable?

MHOL190246

Link Posted 25/11/2016 - 12:46
Re a suitable lens, I normally use a 100mm macro for most of my still life work. But anything that fills the frame should suit

edward124

Link Posted 24/02/2017 - 19:26
davem wrote:
My daughter has started selling her Jewellery online. I was thinking of helping her by taking some good product photography sydney using a table light tent set up. What is the best way to do this? I don't need the best set up ever just something to get me started.

I have seen a set up here link

Its in the sale but by the time you have added VAT and delivery the cost is getting on for 60.

I have a large light tent I got off ebay very cheap a while ago.

Any thoughts?

Dave

Hello Dave,
Can you please upload some new pictures that has been click by you????....

JAK

Link Posted 24/02/2017 - 19:53
chris667 wrote:
I hope you will forgive the link, but it shows the pictures and I am very proud!

https://folksy.com/shops/GwinKerry

They've certainly come out well but can I suggest something to give the items a sense of scale?
John K

davidstorm

Link Posted 24/02/2017 - 21:49
Hi Dave

I would certainly use a lens of at least 100mm focal length, easier to isolate the subjects and get diffused backgrounds. Also, one that has smooth bokeh.

I wouldn't be afraid of using manual focus as it's immaterial on static subjects, you can use the Live View to get it 100% spot on. A lens I have that is very good for this type of work is an old one and can be bought cheaply - a 135mm SMC Takumar F3.5.

Macro lenses will also be good, one that has especially nice rendering and bokeh is the Sigma DG EX 105 Macro, again this can be bought quite cheaply second hand.

Hope this is helpful.

Regards
David
My Website http://imagesbydavidstorm.foliopic.com

Flickr

Some cameras, some lenses, some bits 'n' bobs

davem

Link Posted 24/02/2017 - 22:32
Thanks David.

The photos came out ok using the 100mm DFA macro. But I need to get the white balance white as the background came you grey not the white of the material. Any suggestions?

davidstorm

Link Posted 24/02/2017 - 22:37
Hi Dave

The WB is easily fixed in post processing, you should have a white balance tool in whatever processing software you have? I use Adobe Camera RAW, just click on an area which should be white and it fixes the colour imbalance.

Regards
David
My Website http://imagesbydavidstorm.foliopic.com

Flickr

Some cameras, some lenses, some bits 'n' bobs

pschlute

Link Posted 24/02/2017 - 23:36
Or (if you dont intend to post process, use a grey card in a test shot and adjust the white balance in camera before you do your product shots.

You will also have to overexpose the images. Under exposure will result in grey whites also.
Peter



My Flickr page
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