Monitors and sRGB


sportyman531

Link Posted 16/02/2021 - 10:06
I have been reading monitor reviews and those which are aimed at photographers are often factory calibrated whilst those which are not don't mention this. I have been looking at Dell U type (factory calibrated) models and Dell P type (which in reviews say they closely match sRGB colour space). At my Photographic Society there is a device available to members for calibrating monitors so do I need a factory calibrated model. Ultrasharp monitors seem to be popular with photographers so are there other advantages with them?
flickr ID: SteveW46243 or sw46246
DA AL 35mm f2.4, K3,18-135 WR, DA 55-300, Pentax KX, K5 x 2, 18-50 50-200 kit lenses, Tamron 17-50 f2.8, Fuji X10, 2x Mamiya 1000s 2x 80mm f2.8, 150mm f3.5, 210mm f4, Yashica 124G TLR, 2x Yashica FX3 Super 2000, Tamron 28mm f2.8, 90mm SP f2.5, 135mm f2.5, Olympus 35RC, 2x Yashica FX2, Kodak Pocket Instamatic, Kodak Box Brownie

redbusa99

Link Posted 16/02/2021 - 11:21
i have a Dell U2414H and use a Spyder 4 to calibrate it. The monitor menu allows me to set it up as required by the Spyder for calibration so would assume it would be the same with other calibration devices.
K3 II and the odd lens or 2

Flickr

johnriley

Link Posted 16/02/2021 - 13:13
Sometimes theory and practice don't quite match up. At ADAPS we run everything as sRGB, the logic being that it is the most universal option and helps prevent visting lecturers' images looking out of step, or any members' images for that matter. Some members do use calibration devices, but I can't see any visual evidence that it makes any difference, especially as slightly warm images tend to look better to the human eye anyway. Sometimes attempting to calibrate can be a nightmare in itself.
Best regards, John

Lubbyman

Link Posted 16/02/2021 - 16:59
What matters most is how much of the sRGB colour space the monitor covers. An uncalibrated monitor can always be calibrated. But if a monitor doesn't cover the whole space, calibration can only take it so far, the lack of complete coverage will mean that compromises have to be made. I have 2 monitors, one full sRGB and factory calibrated 'for photographers', one general purpose, not full sRGB and calibrated by me. There is a difference after calibration, although it isn't huge. It was a bigger difference before calibration.

As for ultrasharp monitors, I wish I had ultrasharp eyesight...

Steve

pschlute

Link Posted 16/02/2021 - 21:29
johnriley wrote:
Sometimes theory and practice don't quite match up. At ADAPS we run everything as sRGB, the logic being that it is the most universal option and helps prevent visting lecturers' images looking out of step, or any members' images for that matter.

It makes sense to stick to the most common colour space. But if some of your visiting lecturers or your members, turn up with images in AdobeRGB or ProPhoto colour space (not a good idea), the fact that you have all your screens set to sRGB won't prevent a mis-match.


johnriley wrote:

Some members do use calibration devices, but I can't see any visual evidence that it makes any difference, especially as slightly warm images tend to look better to the human eye anyway. Sometimes attempting to calibrate can be a nightmare in itself.

Tech has moved on in leaps and bounds. 10 years ago the recommendation was to calibrate once a month. Now you can get away with once a year. Of course it is different if you are producing product for commercial publication, where accuracy is essential.
Peter



My Flickr page

Benz3ne

Link Posted 17/02/2021 - 11:11
This has highlighted to me that I ought to calibrate my home computers' screen. It's a lovely thing to look at (28" Acer 4k something or other) but what I'm ultimately settling on, processing-wise, might be completely different to those intended audience members with their calibrated screens.
Worse still, I'd not want to print a shot only for it to look different.

pschlute

Link Posted 17/02/2021 - 13:05
Benz3ne wrote:
This has highlighted to me that I ought to calibrate my home computers' screen. It's a lovely thing to look at (28" Acer 4k something or other) but what I'm ultimately settling on, processing-wise, might be completely different to those intended audience members with their calibrated screens.
Worse still, I'd not want to print a shot only for it to look different.

I am an advocate for calibrating your own screen perhaps twice a year. But if your screen is a newish one , and I guess yours is, I doubt you will see much difference between before and after. However as part of the calibration process you will be setting the brightness. Most screens come out of the factory too bright for photography use especially if you print photos. The most common complaint is "my prints are too dark", to which the answer usually is "no, your screen is too bright"
Peter



My Flickr page

Benz3ne

Link Posted 17/02/2021 - 13:43
pschlute wrote:
However as part of the calibration process you will be setting the brightness. Most screens come out of the factory too bright for photography use especially if you print photos. The most common complaint is "my prints are too dark", to which the answer usually is "no, your screen is too bright"

I'm mistaken, it's 25" not 28"... and was bought in April 2019! I might well see a difference.
Funny you should mention about screen brightness. I picked up on it when using Flickr for the first time. Uploaded some shots I'd taken only to find they were dark on every other viewing device. Brightness from factory... 80.
Brightness now. Early 20's. Made a mighty difference!
Last Edited by Benz3ne on 17/02/2021 - 13:44

sportyman531

Link Posted 17/03/2021 - 09:11
Thanks for the replies everyone, I went for the Dell U2719D on the specification and because the other monitor on my shortlist was constantly on pre-order but never in stock. It's factory calibrated so should be OK for a year but, as mentioned above, the screen is very bright. It is set to 75% from the factory, I've dialled it down to 50% now and will see how it goes.
flickr ID: SteveW46243 or sw46246
DA AL 35mm f2.4, K3,18-135 WR, DA 55-300, Pentax KX, K5 x 2, 18-50 50-200 kit lenses, Tamron 17-50 f2.8, Fuji X10, 2x Mamiya 1000s 2x 80mm f2.8, 150mm f3.5, 210mm f4, Yashica 124G TLR, 2x Yashica FX3 Super 2000, Tamron 28mm f2.8, 90mm SP f2.5, 135mm f2.5, Olympus 35RC, 2x Yashica FX2, Kodak Pocket Instamatic, Kodak Box Brownie
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