ISS passage across the sun


Nickbat

Link Posted 16/08/2016 - 20:01
My local paper is advertising the fact that the International Space Station will be passing across the face of the sun in my neck of the woods this coming Sunday at 1:27pm. My initial thoughts were for those who will not heed the warnings and look up at this naked-eye object...and burn their retinas.

My second thought was about the photographic potential (assuming there are no clouds!). Apparently transit will take 0.6 seconds and the local astronomer reckons it's best to take a video. However, he is quoted as saying that specialist lenses would be required.

Is there any way I could capture this event with my K3-II? What focal length lens would be best and how could I video the sun??? I do have a selection of Cokin filters from the old days, but I suspect that I would need something a bit more industrial!!

Any thoughts/advice would be most welcome.
Last Edited by Nickbat on 16/08/2016 - 20:01

gtis

Link Posted 16/08/2016 - 20:26
Hi
Never look at the sun with you naked eye or any unfiltered lens
That said you could make you own filter using baader solar safety film
But it will only be in white light I made one for looking at Mercury transation
http://www.rothervalleyoptics.co.uk/baader-astrosolar-a4-nd50-safety-film-sheet....
cheers Neil
pentax k3 k5 super A
DA* 300 f4 DA* 50-135 f 2.8 smc DA* 16-50 f2.8 50mm f1.7 af 360 fgz pentax1.4xhd converter
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Nickbat

Link Posted 16/08/2016 - 20:41
gtis wrote:
Hi
Never look at the sun with you naked eye or any unfiltered lens
That said you could make you own filter using baader solar safety film
But it will only be in white light I made one for looking at Mercury transation
http://www.rothervalleyoptics.co.uk/baader-astrosolar-a4-nd50-safety-film-sheet....

Thanks, Neil. Don't worry, I had absolutely no intention of looking anywhere near the sun with the naked eye. That said, I am sure that some will, sadly.

That's an interesting link thanks.

I think it's unlikely that i will bother to buy anything just for this event, so I'll probably just leave it to the experts! Maybe one day, I'll get the screw-on safety filter. Not cheap, but could be useful for the next solar eclipse.
Last Edited by Nickbat on 16/08/2016 - 21:13

petrochemist

Link Posted 18/08/2016 - 18:40
With a little ingenuity you can arrange a setup to project the suns image onto card & then photograph that.
Welding glass of shade 13 or above held in front of the lens will reduce the light (including UV & IR) to safe levels. It might soften the image somewhat more than solar safety sheet, but it's also VERY much cheaper (My Gold welding glass filters where ~20, standard green ones are ~2).

I used projection via a telephoto lens to watch a transit of Venus years ago (but didn't photograph the image) More recently I've taken sun spots via welding glass.
Mike
.
Pentax:K5ii, K7, K100D, DA18-55, DA10-17, DA55-300, DA50-200, F100-300, F50, DA35 AL, 4* M50, 2* M135, Helicoid extension, Tak 300 f4 (& 6 film bodies)
3rd Party: Bigmos (Sigma 150-500mm OS HSM),2* 28mm, 100mm macro, 28-200 zoom, 35-80 zoom, 80-200 zoom, 80-210 zoom, 300mm M42, 600 mirror, 1000-4000 scope, 50mm M42, enlarger lenses, Sony & micro 4/3 cameras with various PK mounts, Zenit E...
Far to many tele-converters, adapters, project parts & extension tubes etc.

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davidwozhere

Link Posted 18/08/2016 - 22:44
For the last eclipse, I discovered that the leader portion (the bit you pull out of the cassette to attach to the take-up spool) of an old set of 35mm negatives was perfect. It is evenly darkened and just the right opacity for staring at the sun's disc.
Both the *istDS and the K5 are incurably addicted to old glass

My page on Photocrowd - link
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