Gimp photo editor


steloz

Link Posted 27/10/2011 - 22:46
Just downloaded this program onto my laptop saying its a free program
with simular spec to adobe ps and you can get free downloads for raw files it looks the part so will be trying it out . Was just wondering if any of you have tried it out
www.gimp.org
K-3. K20D, Pentax 18-55mm AL II, Pentax DA 16-45 Pentax FA 50 F1.4, Pentax 18-135 wr, Pentax-AF 80-200, Pentax DA 55-300, DA 10-17, Metz 48
Last Edited by steloz on 27/10/2011 - 22:59

MarkTaylor

Link Posted 28/10/2011 - 02:13
I use it all the time. Generally speaking it is very good indeed. However it's capabilities are not as close to Photoshop as they once were - more recent versions of PS offer features GIMP unfortunately cannot touch. Photoshop's capability to work with 'smart objects' would make it a very tempting prospect indeed if it were say a third of the asking price.

However to me, what Photoshop can do that GIMP can't is still nowhere near enough to be worth the extremely high asking price. Other people's needs will vary, of course.
My Flickr • Pentax K-5 • K-5 II • Sigma 8-16mm F/4.5-5.6 DC HSM • Tamron SP AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR Di II LD ASL • SMC Pentax-DA* 50-135mm F/2.8 ED [IF] SDM • SMC Pentax-DA 55-300mm F/4-5.8 ED • SMC Pentax-DA 18-135mm F/3.5-5.6 ED AL [IF] WR • Vivitar 100mm F/3.5 Macro AF • Metz Mecablitz 58 AF-2
Last Edited by MarkTaylor on 28/10/2011 - 02:22

DoctorJeff

Link Posted 28/10/2011 - 09:12
I second Mark's comment.
When I tried GIMP, it was somewhere between PS5 and PS6, and it had a few little quirks that irked me - so it went.
There are plenty of free or cheap photo editors around, so the real question is:
"What do you want your program to do?"

PSE7 does almost all that I want, and both PSE7 and PSE8 are available as remainders for under £35, so unless you have a really powerful technical need, why pay more?

Once, I had a PC full of Word-processors (when I was producing all sorts of tricky documents), now I have a range of free or cheap photo editors some of which are used for only one job (example: an old PSP X is used just to resize images to 1024 x 768 pixels, on an automatic basis), and most of my editing is done in PSE7 (and most of that can be done on PSE4 on a very old and slow Mac).

There really is no need to pay big money - but you still have to sort out what you want to do with the program (otherwise you are sort-of buying a K5 to take snapshots of the new baby - sort-of thing).

Geoff
Water can wear away a stone - but it can't cook lunch
X-5
istDS
K2000
P50.
Lenses Digital: 50-200, 18-55 KAF: 28-80.
Lenses KA & K: SMC-KA f2.0, SMC-K f1.4, SMC-K f1.7 Tokina KA 28-70 , SMC Pentax 70-210 F4, Sigma KA 75-300 , Hanimex 500mm Mirror, and the Tamron Adaptall-2 stuff.
and then there's all the M42 kit, and the accessories ...
Last Edited by DoctorJeff on 28/10/2011 - 09:13

chrissinkpen

Link Posted 28/10/2011 - 09:21
Hi Geoff,
Do any of the "free" downloads accommodate 'HDR'??

Regards

Chris

DoctorJeff

Link Posted 28/10/2011 - 10:12
At least three of them Chris,
but I have not tried any of them.

More to follow on this.

Geoff
Water can wear away a stone - but it can't cook lunch
X-5
istDS
K2000
P50.
Lenses Digital: 50-200, 18-55 KAF: 28-80.
Lenses KA & K: SMC-KA f2.0, SMC-K f1.4, SMC-K f1.7 Tokina KA 28-70 , SMC Pentax 70-210 F4, Sigma KA 75-300 , Hanimex 500mm Mirror, and the Tamron Adaptall-2 stuff.
and then there's all the M42 kit, and the accessories ...

chrissinkpen

Link Posted 28/10/2011 - 10:22
Thanks Geoff, in the meantime I might see how the K7 produces It's own.
Regards

Chris

WobblyGoblin

Link Posted 28/10/2011 - 11:11
I'm a big advocate of GIMP - for a free open-source program it's great value

I have PSE9 and rarely use that in preference to GIMP (only for context aware fill, really). GIMP is aimed at the full Photoshop program rather than Elements (with more fine cotrol over adjustments such as curves).

You do need to put a bit of work in and add your own plug-ins for things like unsharp mask though.

WG
You will only prise my 43Ltd from my cold, dead hands...

DoctorJeff

Link Posted 28/10/2011 - 13:49
As a followup to the question asked by chrissinkpen on HDR software ...
I identified three possibilities to try out:
Picturenaut
FDRTools Basic
Essential HDR Community Edition

As with a lot of Freeware, they all have snags. Of the lot, Picturenaut is the one I plan on trying first. It seems a good way of finding out whether I want to get into HDR seriously.
Geoff
Water can wear away a stone - but it can't cook lunch
X-5
istDS
K2000
P50.
Lenses Digital: 50-200, 18-55 KAF: 28-80.
Lenses KA & K: SMC-KA f2.0, SMC-K f1.4, SMC-K f1.7 Tokina KA 28-70 , SMC Pentax 70-210 F4, Sigma KA 75-300 , Hanimex 500mm Mirror, and the Tamron Adaptall-2 stuff.
and then there's all the M42 kit, and the accessories ...

ChrisR

Link Posted 28/10/2011 - 15:44
steloz wrote:
Just downloaded this program onto my laptop saying its a free program
with simular spec to adobe ps and you can get free downloads for raw files it looks the part so will be trying it out . Was just wondering if any of you have tried it out
www.gimp.org

My question, is “Gimp” safe to down load, for example what is there motive for providing free software, which another provider will and can charge a few hundred pounds for.
Is there spy ware or some other nasty that is being downloaded at the same time.

The reason for my question, in my experience, nothing in life is free, there is always a catch.


Take care.
Chris R.

I. El. (Eng). (Rtd).

DoctorJeff

Link Posted 28/10/2011 - 21:11
ChrisR wrote:

My question, is “Gimp” safe to down load, for example what is there motive for providing free software, which another provider will and can charge a few hundred pounds for.
Is there spy ware or some other nasty that is being downloaded at the same time.
The reason for my question, in my experience, nothing in life is free, there is always a catch.

GIMP is totally safe to download. No nasties, no spyware, and if you run a Unix or Linux system, it really is the only serious game in town. The idea of giving software away for free is not new, by about 20 years or so.
- Some programmers do it for the technical challenge, just to show that they can do it better.
- Some programmers do it as a form of advertising, and hope that one of the bigger companies will offer them a job.
- Some do it until they have all the bugs out, and they have a large user base, and they go commercial with the next version.
- Some do not really have a choice. Some years back, my University was part of a consortium doing research for the MOD. Our part (and I led the project for two years) was to develop software for training needs analysis. We produced the best software for Hierarchical Task Analysis (HTA) that had been developed up to that point - and I am talking world class here. The deal was that it was given free to anyone that the MOD said to give it to. We asked if we could also give it away free to anyone we wanted to - and they said yes (terms and conditions applied). It is in use worldwide. There was no catch. It really was free. Anyone using it, got all the technical support that they had paid for. In fact they got a bit more - but we got a lot of user feedback which helped to improve the program.

You see, if you provide technical support, then someone has to pay for it. With normal commercial software, that is costed in to the price of the software. if the market will take 30, 40, 50,000 copies, £50 or £100 for support will buy quite a lot of support. If you only sell 10,000 copies, the support cost is near enough the same, but the percentage that has to be added on to the purchase price is much larger.

Anyway, GIMP has been around for a few years - and if there was anything the slightest bit dubious about it, I am quite sure that it would have been reported very widely. So, nothing to worry about.
Geoff
Water can wear away a stone - but it can't cook lunch
X-5
istDS
K2000
P50.
Lenses Digital: 50-200, 18-55 KAF: 28-80.
Lenses KA & K: SMC-KA f2.0, SMC-K f1.4, SMC-K f1.7 Tokina KA 28-70 , SMC Pentax 70-210 F4, Sigma KA 75-300 , Hanimex 500mm Mirror, and the Tamron Adaptall-2 stuff.
and then there's all the M42 kit, and the accessories ...

snappychappy

Link Posted 28/10/2011 - 21:21
If you are worried about spyware, download and run all programs in a sandbox, such as this program.SANDBOXIE
My piccies.

MarkTaylor

Link Posted 29/10/2011 - 00:28
DoctorJeff wrote:
- Some programmers do it for the technical challenge, just to show that they can do it better.
- Some programmers do it as a form of advertising, and hope that one of the bigger companies will offer them a job.
- Some do it until they have all the bugs out, and they have a large user base, and they go commercial with the next version.
- Some do not really have a choice.

...And some programmers get paid very handsomely to do it. There are certain open source projects which are vital to the Linux community - without them the Linux user base would diminish because Linux would no longer be able to provide the functionality users need. The Linux Kernel itself and OpenOffice/LibreOffice are the biggest, most obvious examples of this but GIMP is definitely up there too - it fills a gap for which there is considerable demand.

Companies who make their money out of Linux such as Canonical, Novell, Red Hat and others have a vested interest in making sure these projects continue to thrive. If a major project like GIMP is seriously flagging some corporation - possibly several corporations - will understandably get a bit nervous and start throwing some money at it. They will either have their own developers work on it or they will pay existing developers who have had to reduce their input to the project due to the fact that it doesn't (or at least didn't previously) pay for a roof over their heads. And they will make damn sure that not just the Linux version, but also the Windows and Mac versions get maintained because they know very well that hardly anybody - especially the business users who are their bread and butter - would migrate to Linux unless they've had the proof that the software can cater for their needs on their existing platform first.

Even companies who do not make money out of Linux - who are merely users of open source software - contribute to certain projects. One major reason for businesses to use open source software in the first place is because they can customise it and add features to suit their own needs. Once their developers have completed such enhancements they then tend to contribute them back to the main project - in fact most open source software licences require them to do so.

...And believe it or not, some programmers do it because they genuinely believe in free software as a matter of principle.

---

As far as safety concerns go, developers cannot 'hide' spyware and other nasties in open source software because because the source code is open and available for everybody and anybody to see. In fact that is what 'open source' means.

Any 'nasties' in open source code would therefore be discovered and made public far more quickly than is even possible with commercial software.

Which means - yup - open source software is almost certainly far safer than software you paid hundreds of pounds for. Do you really think commercial software companies don't include things in their packages you probably wouldn't like very much if you knew about them? Their source code is secret, they do not have to disclose it - in fact there are laws against attempting to 'decompile' or reverse engineer it - so they can put pretty much anything they damn well feel like in there.
My Flickr • Pentax K-5 • K-5 II • Sigma 8-16mm F/4.5-5.6 DC HSM • Tamron SP AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR Di II LD ASL • SMC Pentax-DA* 50-135mm F/2.8 ED [IF] SDM • SMC Pentax-DA 55-300mm F/4-5.8 ED • SMC Pentax-DA 18-135mm F/3.5-5.6 ED AL [IF] WR • Vivitar 100mm F/3.5 Macro AF • Metz Mecablitz 58 AF-2
Last Edited by MarkTaylor on 29/10/2011 - 01:02

ChrisR

Link Posted 29/10/2011 - 09:39
Many thanks, Geoff, Stephen and Mark.


As I have zero computer skills or knowledge, I am very cautious, may be over cautious, but on this one you have put my mind at rest.
Thank you again.

Take care.
Chris R.

I. El. (Eng). (Rtd).

steloz

Link Posted 29/10/2011 - 14:48
Just installed ufraw onto laptop which deals with the PEF files and works well with Gimp as a plug-in well impressed so far as a freeby
http://ufraw.sourceforge.net/Install.html
K-3. K20D, Pentax 18-55mm AL II, Pentax DA 16-45 Pentax FA 50 F1.4, Pentax 18-135 wr, Pentax-AF 80-200, Pentax DA 55-300, DA 10-17, Metz 48
Last Edited by steloz on 29/10/2011 - 14:49

Rodders53

Link Posted 29/10/2011 - 17:40
UFRAW doesn't fully support my K-r so I use the Pentax utility to develop and then go on to Gimp as necessary.
Last Edited by Rodders53 on 29/10/2011 - 17:40
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