When you go out with your camera...


scarr1

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 00:25
Gonna be a bit of a strange question this, and i hope it makes some sense. When you go out with your camera, is it a conscious decision to go out to take photographs...ie going out with that sole intention with a pre-planned idea of what you want....or do you take photographs because you are out? Does that make sense?
Why im asking is i seem to have got stuck in a bit of a rut, photography wise...
Ive done a couple of group photography sessions in newcastle and durham, based on a particular theme...nightlights, waterfalls, historic buildings etc, and have really enjoyed them, and have got some great images.
Yet i can go out for the day with the wife, or go out with the dogs etc, take the camera, yet get nothing....literally.
Maybe i need to join a club or something, or attend some local get togethers.

richandfleur

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 01:05
My iPhone takes photos when I'm out and about.

My DSLR gets pulled out for times when I want good photos.

It's all photography.

pentaxian450

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 03:57
Sometimes, your surroundings become so common to you that you fail to see things that would make a good picture.

Try to fix yourself a goal when you go out, like taking pictures of doors adorning the buildings around you, or details about lanes or street around were you are.

Going out with a camera without aim is a recipe for failure. Most people going out with a camera already have an idea of what they want to photograph, sometime subconsciously.
Yves (another one of those crazy Canucks)

Horst

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 05:26
When I go out with my Wife, I take my K5 with the Pentax-F 35-70mm

When I go alone, I take again the 35-70mm but also a few other lenses.

Pentaxian wrote:

Quote:
Sometimes, your surroundings become so common to you that you fail to see things that would make a good picture.

This is quite correct. Even when you visit the same spot say after a week, Things have changed.
including the weather. it may be blue sky or cloudy.

Thing look different and a picture you took then and didn't like much may turn out perfect this time.

The main thing is always to take your camera.

I give you a good example: A few weeks ago my wife and I went to a picnic somewhere in the Australian Bush. We started to go for a walk, according to my wife for health reasons.
I took my camera, but she started to whinge and carried on, because the walk was a start-stop walk.

I gave in and we started walking. About 10 Minutes after, we saw a dead Kangaroo on the side of the track. Chewing on it, was a great big Gianna, about 2 meters overall. We stood there and looked at it. And me e without a camera!!. After about a minute, the beast turn around and looked at us, wiggled its tongue and the started at high speed to charge at us. I had my heavy walking boots on and started to kick at it.
It made no difference, the bloody thing didn't give up until my wife opened her umbrella and pushed it towards the Gianna. It left me alone and I could have taken a great picture with my wife and the Brolly
against the monster. It finally took off. Then I had a need to change my underpants Of course I could only tell the story and not show it, because I listened to the big boss and left the camera in the car.
A lesson learned.

Regards, Horst
Last Edited by Horst on 13/02/2016 - 05:27

johnriley

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 08:06
It's a matter of focus.

If I think there's little chance of photography I always have the MX-1 in my pocket. Then I can take pictures should a situation arise, or should we stumble upon something interesting.

If there's a good chance but large cameras would be frowned upon, such as a concert, then the Q-S1 is ideal, with its choice of lenses.

If it's a photo trip out, and every day out is, then it's the DSLR small kit with K-5, 18-135mm, 10-17mm, 43mm and 55-300mm.

If it's a photo job then as many lenses as required, plus backup camera, etc.

To get the best images, we need to be in photography-mode, the casual approach is a bit random. Of course, there are different levels of interest and that matters too.
Best regards, John
Last Edited by johnriley on 13/02/2016 - 08:07

RobL

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 08:09
Horst wrote:

I give you a good example: A few weeks ago my wife and I went to a picnic somewhere in the Australian Bush. We started to go for a walk, according to my wife for health reasons.
I took my camera, but she started to whinge and carried on, because the walk was a start-stop walk.

I gave in and we started walking. About 10 Minutes after, we saw a dead Kangaroo on the side of the track. Chewing on it, was a great big Gianna, about 2 meters overall. We stood there and looked at it. And me e without a camera!!. After about a minute, the beast turn around and looked at us, wiggled its tongue and the started at high speed to charge at us. I had my heavy walking boots on and started to kick at it.
It made no difference, the bloody thing didn't give up until my wife opened her umbrella and pushed it towards the Gianna. It left me alone and I could have taken a great picture with my wife and the Brolly
against the monster. It finally took off. Then I had a need to change my underpants Of course I could only tell the story and not show it, because I listened to the big boss and left the camera in the car.
A lesson learned.

Regards, Horst

Shame, if you had the K5 you could have brained it!
I'm glad I live here, the most aggressive thing we meet is a moody sheep. Carrying a camera on the off-chance of a photo opportunity guarantees that nothing will occur in my experience; best to plan and set out for a particular subject, or visit somewhere like a falconry centre or steam train line, even if this is outside your usual area of interest.
Last Edited by RobL on 13/02/2016 - 08:25

bwlchmawr

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 08:10
The best way to take better pictures is to stand in front of something more interesting.

You live in a wonderful part of the country with a wealth of photographic subjects (if holidays in England weren't so expensive I'd be up there like a shot).

I'm sure when the spring arrives you'll find inspiration. That Beamish place would keep me shooting for hours, for example...
Best wishes,

Andrew

"These places mean something and it's the job of a photographer to figure-out what the hell it is."
Robert Adams
"The camera doesn't make a bit of difference. All of them can record what you are seeing. But, you have to SEE."
Ernst Hass
My website: http://www.ephotozine.com/user/bwlchmawr-199050 http://s927.photobucket.com/home/ADC3440/index
https://www.flickr.com/photos/78898196@N05

johnriley

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 08:12
Beamish is brilliant Andrew, and what you say is spot on.

First, find your interesting subject and everything else should follow.
Best regards, John

scarr1

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 09:14
Im 50 years old, i live about 6 or 7 miles from Beamish, and i've never been!
My son (22) went with his girlfriend not long back, and came back with loads of retro sweets....he really enjoyed it.
Gonna look it up now, and definately go.

Jonathan-Mac

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 09:40
I do both. I try to always have a camera with me just in case. If I'm not going out specifically to take photos then the camera will often be either my Fuji X-M with a manual prime on it or a film compact or SLR. I won't lug a DSLR around if I don't know for sure I'll be taking photos.
Pentax hybrid user - Digital K3, film 645 and 35mm SLR and Pentax (&other) lenses adapted to Fuji X and Panasonic L digital
Fan of DA limited and old manual lenses

kh1234567890

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 09:42
It depends on whether 'taking the camera' involves dragging along a huge bag of heavy lenses, adaptors, batteries, lens brushes - not to mention a tripod, or just plonking on a little DA Ltd lens and leaving all that junk at home.

I find that the light is always changing, that there are always little interesting details I'd not noticed before. As I don't really care if anyone else ever looks at my shots, I try to capture the feel of the moment so that years later I can look at a photo and remember what the world felt like to me at that time.
Flickr Stream

wvbarnes

Link Posted 13/02/2016 - 10:02
I now have (big birthday) one of those little one inch sensored zoom compacts for fun, flip screen selfies, out at night etc. I don't really like it though over my DSLR as no viewfinder. I don't use a smart phone. Sadly Ricoh/Pentax don't make one.

As spring approaches I take my shoulder bagged K3 and all three lenses (12 - 24, 18- 135, 300mm and adapter) on long walks with dogs in Peak District. If local I sling just K3 with 300mm and tele adapter over my shoulder so I don't miss the emerging wildlife. If you want landscapes you need to be early or late light wise I reckon and if with the wife have one who is patient enough for the photography. Our dogs are happy playing.

I'm not one for alone at 3am in the ditch with a flask fan and hate lugging tripods. I'll never outdo some on here then.

Each to their own with this photography hobby eh?

scarr1

Link Posted 14/02/2016 - 01:15
Thanks for all the advice, really appreciate all your comments.

Ive looked into Beamish Museum, and a 12 month pass can be bought for 18.50. Im taking my daughter, snow permitting, horse riding at Pockerley Riding School tomorrow, which is literally 5 minutes away from Beamish, so im gonna call in and get x2 annual passes.
Now you may think that taking my daughter riding would be a good subject....i would; but she just wont let me do it....cant even take my camera!

Thanks again for all the positive advice....

gtis

Link Posted 14/02/2016 - 09:44
Hi
A group of us went on a pentax meet organised by Bforbes to beamish and had a really good day out dispite the grey day so it's well worth going and with a annual pass you could go as many times has you like
Neil
cheers Neil
pentax k3
DA* 300 f4 DA* 50-135 f 2.8 smc DA* 16-50 f2.8 50mm f1.7 pentax1.4xhd converter





Panasonic Dmc Fz200

bwlchmawr

Link Posted 14/02/2016 - 19:08
Great place to use one of the K5 derivatives as you'll need the wonderful high ISO performance for indoor shots. Leave the MX-1/K10 at home for the day...
Best wishes,

Andrew

"These places mean something and it's the job of a photographer to figure-out what the hell it is."
Robert Adams
"The camera doesn't make a bit of difference. All of them can record what you are seeing. But, you have to SEE."
Ernst Hass
My website: http://www.ephotozine.com/user/bwlchmawr-199050 http://s927.photobucket.com/home/ADC3440/index
https://www.flickr.com/photos/78898196@N05
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