What would/should you do?


bettyswolloks

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 13:30
This link made me think.

johnriley

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 13:44
It's a moral dilemma of course. On the one hand the photographer could leap into the fray, be beaten or worse and nothing would have been gained. At least by taking the photograph and walking away there is a record of a dreadful incident. This in itself could garner support amongst those who can do something about it.

In the fray, war photographers brave hails of bullets and walk oblivious amongst the mayhem. Personal safety doesn't come into it as they are absorbed in doing their job.

This isn't quite the same, but the photographer has at least preserved the message and brought it to the world. He is being quite brutal with himself over motivation, whether through honesty at his own failings as a human being or perhaps feeling a sense of futility and apportioning blame on himself where actually the blame lies entirely with those involved.

paulgee20

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 14:26
Take the photograph for the record and or identification purposes and remember the song from the Italian job......

'This is the self preservation society'
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greynolds999

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 15:10
It is an interesting dilemma and far too complicated to resolve. Although I actually think the basis of the article which was the behaviour of the photographer in India may be a little erroneous as the current investigation is to whether he was actually encouraging this woman's assault, link which is a different thing altogether.
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johnriley

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 15:23
Indeed so, in which case it's not really a discussion about the moral dilemmas of photography any more.
Best regards, John

bettyswolloks

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 17:56
In most case's there is nothing that a photographer could do to help out, stopping a mob thats intent on blood or fixing the whole famine area. One lone photographer is powerless to change the outcome in such situations, so documenting it is our job as photographers. But the case of the indian sexual assault is differant as they could of, and should of, stepped in and helped out.

geclinke

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 18:55
My opinion might be an unpopular one, but I don't believe holding a camera abstracts you from social responsibility.
If you choose to put yourself into these situations, then you have to deal with the consequences of your actions.
In a lot of cases reportage photographers have used their images to heighten awareness of issues. If that were me, I might be able to reconcile the suffering I saw with the subsequent help from aid, charity, or general awareness, which resulted from my efforts.

I have little sympathy for commercial photographers who seek out suffering for personal financial gain. Paparazzi, anyone?
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cabstar

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 19:11
Hmm interesting read, most people walk past conflict or danger, it's inbuilt within us, don't believe it? Watch this

Or google milligram experiments.

Photographers on their own cant change outcomes by themselves, their work can.

Paparazzi are not commercial photographers, they are commercial bodies that is it...
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Fletcher8

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 19:49
Speaking as a photographer the moment should be recorded, but as human beings we should also have some social responsibility. I think we all make choices in relation to certain situations and assess the risks. Sadly many people think it is someone else's responsibility so know one does anything.
Fletcher8.

bettyswolloks

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 21:02
I was once sat on a wall minding my own buisness having a rest while out and about with my camera, when I heard a thud, I looked up only to see an old woman face down on the floor. I ran across the road to help Phyliss up. She was outside her care home, when help arrived one of the care workers spotted my camera on the grass and said, "I bet you took a picture before you helped"
I wish I had it looked surreal!

dougf8

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 22:03
cabstar wrote:
Hmm interesting read, most people walk past conflict or danger, it's inbuilt within us, don't believe it? Watch this

Or google milligram experiments.

Photographers on their own cant change outcomes by themselves, their work can.

Paparazzi are not commercial photographers, they are commercial bodies that is it...

That's not really conflict or danger. That is a school and young people more than likely inured to this kind of thing and less experienced in what a prone body might mean. There have been studies in the past (as seen on TV) and experiments showing ignoring is more pronounced in cities, in villages and small communities people are helped almost instantly. I think because you are more likely to know the person in need than in a city. Some cities are exceptions, like Bristol, first time I went there we couldn't stand still for a minute without somebody asking us if we needed help or directions! We weren't even lying unconscious.
Lurking is shirking.!

cabstar

Link Posted 29/07/2012 - 23:29
Ah but how often are these photographers shooting in an English village???
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dougf8

Link Posted 30/07/2012 - 00:56
cabstar wrote:
Ah but how often are these photographers shooting in an English village???

??? I'm just pointing out the video doesn't really illustrate conflict or danger.

I dont think the Milgram experiment has anything to do with this. It seems to be more the bystander effect. Which has specific mention of school children as per your video.

It more aptly puts it as the number of people about rather than a village and city setting.

But hey, it's late and I'm no expert....
Lurking is shirking.!
Last Edited by dougf8 on 30/07/2012 - 00:58

Don

Link Posted 30/07/2012 - 02:03
greynolds999 wrote:
It is an interesting dilemma and far too complicated to resolve. Although I actually think the basis of the article which was the behaviour of the photographer in India may be a little erroneous as the current investigation is to whether he was actually encouraging this woman's assault, link which is a different thing altogether.

in that bass ackwards country, I'd say the photographer is being framed... for publishing embarrassing to the country photos he's showing the world how barbaric that society can be....
Fired many shots. Didn't kill anything.

Smeggypants

Link Posted 30/07/2012 - 04:01
Don wrote:
greynolds999 wrote:
It is an interesting dilemma and far too complicated to resolve. Although I actually think the basis of the article which was the behaviour of the photographer in India may be a little erroneous as the current investigation is to whether he was actually encouraging this woman's assault, link which is a different thing altogether.

in that bass ackwards country, I'd say the photographer is being framed... for publishing embarrassing to the country photos he's showing the world how barbaric that society can be....

I'm offended by someone calling India a 'bass ackwards country'

Which country was the Christian School ( which Gary linked to below ) where no one helped the person on the ground in?

Nationalistic Supremacism isn't a civilised trait I'd say. Most Indian deople are decent civilised people, but just like North America there are exceptions

cabstar wrote:
Hmm interesting read, most people walk past conflict or danger, it's inbuilt within us, don't believe it? Watch this

Or google milligram experiments.

Photographers on their own cant change outcomes by themselves, their work can.

.

Well said Gary. Most people do walk on by regardless of their moralistic claims. Photographs of abhorrent events can raise awareness and help towards change for good.
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