Super taumar polarising filter


theonenadeem

Link Posted 20/01/2018 - 15:08
I am considering buyining a polarizing filter for my supertakumar 50mm 1.4 lens.

I wondered if there was a difference between a modern polaring filter and an older one., in terms of how the filter affects the image.

Regards

JAK

Link Posted 20/01/2018 - 18:18
Can you define modern and older?!
I still use Polarizers I purchased in the 1970's and they work just fine.
I suspect what you mean by 'modern' are those described as circular. With some brands using those can make a difference (when indeed the non-circular may not work as expected) but I haven't noticed any problem with non-circular on my Pentax DSLRs. The circular description doesn't refer to the shape of the filter but the way in which light passes through it.
John K

pschlute

Link Posted 20/01/2018 - 18:51
I think the main problem with older linear polarisers is that they may prevent the AF from working correctly. With a Takumar lens that wont be an issue.
Peter



My Flickr page

theonenadeem

Link Posted 21/01/2018 - 00:40
I am aware that a film camera requires a polarizer filter (if thats the correct term)whereas a digital camera does not.
There may be an assumption that the 60/70/80s film era polarizers are fit for purpose and may even be made from better materials
Wheras modern day filters may be inferior in comparision and diminiss the qualty of the image .

Regards

JAK

Link Posted 21/01/2018 - 01:15
theonenadeem wrote:
I am aware that a film camera requires a polarizer filter (if thats the correct term)whereas a digital camera does not.
There may be an assumption that the 60/70/80s film era polarizers are fit for purpose and may even be made from better materials
Wheras modern day filters may be inferior in comparision and diminiss the qualty of the image .

Regards

No camera actually requires a polarizer. They are designed to cut out unwanted reflections and can darken the sky depending on direction and lighting conditions. Sure you're not thinking of skylight/UV filters? As with any filter you get what you pay for, but that doesn't mean some of the cheaper ones aren't worth considering.
As to using filters for monochrome film, people often used a coloured filter to give a better contrast for some subjects and lighting conditions.
Skylight/UV filters are often used for colour slide film to cut down the bluey haze effect and some use them as lens protectors with digital.
Some digital users like to use graduated filters which can help darken bright skies. These are often square in shape but round ones do exist.
What are you wanting to achieve with your intended filter purchase as that might help pointing you to the right thing and stop you getting something you don't need!? The age of the filter is the least of the considerations and there are often excellent condition second hand old filters in camera shop bargain bins and eBay at a fraction of the cost of new ones which will suffice just fine. But you need to know what you want!
John K
Last Edited by JAK on 21/01/2018 - 01:26

theonenadeem

Link Posted 21/01/2018 - 03:18
It may be a filter . I read , when using a film camera strong light can affect the image .
And a filter is helpful.

Regards

Nadeem:

johnriley

Link Posted 21/01/2018 - 10:15
Don't use a filter for the sake of it, there's no point in adding more glass in front of your lens unless there is a purpose in mind.

Almost all filter effects can be done in Photoshop, but with film obviously we need to use something physical to get the desired resuts. So, with black and white film blue skies tend to look bland and adding a yellow, orange or red filter gives darker blues and more dramatic cloud formations. With colour film you might want to reduce the blue in mountain scenes, so a UV or Skylight filter will do that. If you want to warm the image then an 81A is a good place to start.

Now polarisers are unique in that they affect the polarisation of incoming light, something that can't be added in Photoshop. They will darken blue skies, intensify colours and reduce reflections from water, but it will depend on the light at the time. They are potentially useful, not essential by any means, but don't use one permanently as you will also lose 2.5 stops or so of light and that will mean slower shutter speeds and more danger of camera shake.

There are plenty of books and YouTube videos about filters, and some research would be a good idea before deciding what to buy.
Best regards, John
Last Edited by johnriley on 21/01/2018 - 10:15

McGregNi

Link Posted 21/01/2018 - 18:21
I agree with all that's been written above . Based on what you have written yourself so far, then at this stage you should avoid all filters. Until you have studied up more on filters then using them is more likely to degrade your image quality rather then enhance it

The most important accessory to start with for your old lens is a good hood. This will help the lens to produce it's best, especially in sunny conditions.
My Guides to the Pentax Digital Camera Flash Lighting System : Download here from the PentaxForums Homepage Article .... link
Pentax K7 with BG-4 Grip / Samyang 14mm f2.8 ED AS IF UMC / DA18-55mm f3.5-5.6 AL WR / SMC A28mm f2.8 / D FA 28-105mm / SMC F35-70 f3.5-4.5 / SMC A50mm f1.7 / Tamron AF70-300mm f4-5.6 Di LD macro / SMC M75-150mm f4.0 / Tamron Adaptall (CT-135) 135mm f2.8 / Asahi Takumar-A 2X tele-converter / Pentax AF-540FGZ (I & II) Flashes / Cactus RF60/X Flashes & V6/V6II Transceiver

theonenadeem

Link Posted 21/01/2018 - 18:38
Thanks

Jack,John,Mcgreni,Psclute.

Regards

Defragged

Link Posted 21/01/2018 - 23:22
A bit more info here that you might find helpful from a very interesting and engaging photographer:-

https://youtu.be/xvD-CKPceg0
C.O.L.B.A.S victim
(Compulsive Obsessive Lens Buying Addiction Syndrome)

What you need are lenses, more lenses, bigger lenses, better lenses, faster lenses, and when you have these, your pictures will be perfect!

davidwozhere

Link Posted 22/01/2018 - 01:19
I couldn't agree more about a hood. With=fantastic; without=frequently washed out.
Also you can use deeper hoods with cropped sensor cameras which would almost certainly result in vignetting on a full frame job. On my (already deeply recessed) 50mm macro lenses I always use a Takumar style 49mm metal hood intended for a 135mm lens, which leaves the actual front glass at the bottom of a very long, black tunnel. It provides lovely rich colours.
Both the *istDS and the K5 are incurably addicted to old glass

My page on Photocrowd - link
Add a Comment
You must be registered or logged-in to comment.