Photos from Asia


milamber

Link Posted 30/12/2011 - 14:04
Finally managed to sort through my photos from my recent trip to Asia and thought I might post a few I liked best here.

This was my first proper trip with my K-r - I've used it a bit in and around my home since buying it to get used to it, but this is the first time I've used it extensively. It certainly takes some getting used to, but is capable of some lovely images when I manage to fluke the right combination of subject and settings.

I took the Pentax 18-250mm with me and my FA 50mm 1.7. In the end I didn't use the 50mm at all and the 18-250mm stayed on the camera the whole time. I had a few times when low light might have meant that the 50mm was the better choice, but the zoom was so versatile and the low light capabilities of the K-r so impressive, that it wasn't an issue.

I had plenty of failures as I'm still learning, but these are some of the ones I like best. It does show that in the right hands (not mine yet!) the 18-250mm is a stunning lens across the whole range if used correctly.

Most of the portraits were taken with permission, particularly of the children. I prefer to take pictures with the permission of the subject, but still haven't overcome the inherent reluctance to ask and miss out on a lot as a result.

Any comments, criticisms or helpful suggestions appreciated. Everything taken with aperture priority and hand held (except for the last one for which I used the beanbag.




F8, 1/13, ISO 200 @ 42mm - utterly wrong for a portrait in all respects. So desperate to take the picture after being told I could got everything wrong. Good job the K-r is so forgiving. Cropped to about 50% and then enlarged 4 times, but no enhancement




F6.3, 1/1000, ISO 200 @ 250mm - the young lady was part of a street carnival and I was some way back so needed the full 250mm. Amazed it came out as well as it did. Cropped to 40% and enlarged 4 times with some slight shadow enhancement.




F9, 1/400, ISO 200 @ 42mm - no permission for this one taken in a market so a little snatched. Cropped to around 60% then enlarged 3 times and slightly enhanced




F5.6, 1/1600, ISO200 @ 110mm - another part of the carnival so a little snatched again rather than posed. Cropped to 50% and enlarged 3 times.




F6.3, 1/40. ISO 800 @ 18mm. Very low light in here and active children. Barely any drop in quality from ISO 200 to 800, though. Cropped to 70% and enlarged 2 times.




F4.5, 1/80, ISO 1250 @ 50mm and accidently -0.7 step after failing to reset the camera from an earlier shot! Not a great picture with the man in the background, but great quality for a moving subject in poor artificial light at 1250 ISO. Cropped 50% and enlarged 3 times.




F9, 1/400, ISO 200 @ 250mm. Again demonstrates that the 18-250mm is certainly not soft at the long end as sometimes reported. Cropped to about 30% and enlarged 4 times.




F5.6, 1/30, ISO 500 @ 22mm and -0.7 stop. No cropping, but slight contrast enhancement.




F4.5, 0.8 seconds, ISO 400 @ 65mm and -2 stop. No cropping or enhancement.

I have another 10 or so that I like, but will leave it at this for now. I'd be happy to post some more, but didn't want to overdo it!
Last Edited by milamber on 30/12/2011 - 14:12

fatspider

Link Posted 30/12/2011 - 14:17
Doesn't matter how good you get you will always have failures, I've come back from some holidays with nothing worth showing, the trick is having the eye to see the images before you take them and it looks like you didn't do that bad.

I wont offer any individual C&C (its not like you can nip back and try again is it) but I think the best of the bunch are the three boys and the dancer.
My Names Alan, and I'm a lensaholic.
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carkaci

Link Posted 30/12/2011 - 14:53
Nice works, thanks for sharing !
Regards;

Emre

milamber

Link Posted 30/12/2011 - 14:54
Hi Alan

Thanks for that. It's funny how we all see things differently as I don't really rate the dancer one. I did everything wrong including the -0.7 stop error and really just included it to show the capabilities of the K-r in low light even with an idiot operating it!

It's actually three girls. Difficult to tell with the shaved heads, but they are in Buddhist nun clothing, not monk, which is the only way I can tell either. 500 kids in that orphanage with nothing of their own run on a budget of around US$30000 a year, yet they were some of the happiest people we have ever seen. Come back to Britain where most people have more than people in Myanmar could ever dream of and who are, on the whole, as miserable as sin. Makes you think.

It was the only place we have ever been where the children had never been photographed before and were fascinated by seeing themselves. We were as much as a novelty to them as they were to us.

Pentaxophile

Link Posted 30/12/2011 - 14:55
I really like the first and second shots, and the three boys shot is great!

The low light shots look a bit on the murky / orange side.

As a general note, which applies particularly to the shot of the old lady in the market, the three boys [Edit- girls!], and the girl with the SUV in the background, I would like to see much narrower DOF than we see here.

Quote:
I had a few times when low light might have meant that the 50mm was the better choice, but the zoom was so versatile and the low light capabilities of the K-r so impressive, that it wasn't an issue.

The 50mm would have allowed you to isolate your subject much better though, at f2-f4 apertures. This is something lacking in the old lady shot, and the shot of the boys [Edit- girls!], where the background and surroundings distract and reduce the shot's potential impact.

Of course including a subject's surrounding context is important, I'm just saying it doesn't all have to be so sharp it fights for attention! More like the background in shot 2, which I like!

A nice set indeed though.
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Last Edited by Pentaxophile on 30/12/2011 - 14:58

milamber

Link Posted 30/12/2011 - 15:05
Pentaxophile wrote:
I really like the first and second shots, and the three boys shot is great!

The low light shots look a bit on the murky / orange side.

As a general note, which applies particularly to the shot of the old lady in the market, the three boys, and the girl with the SUV in the background, I would like to see much narrower DOF than we see here.

Quote:
I had a few times when low light might have meant that the 50mm was the better choice, but the zoom was so versatile and the low light capabilities of the K-r so impressive, that it wasn't an issue.

The 50mm would have allowed you to isolate your subject much better though, at f2-f4 apertures. This is something lacking in the old lady shot, and the shot of the boys, where the background and surroundings distract and reduce the shot's potential impact.

Of course including a subject's surrounding context is important, I'm just saying it doesn't all have to be so sharp it fights for attention!

A nice set indeed though.

You are absolutely right. My main problem is that I tend to rush the shots, either because I take it quickly in case the subject sees me and objects or because, even with permission given I tend to try to get it over with as fast as possible as I feel I am imposing. Sounds daft perhaps, but it's something I need to learn to overcome.

I spent ages reading about the best way to take photos for a given situation and even took some notes with me. In the end it all goes out the window when faced with the opportunity......comes with experience I guess.

Certainly the 50mm would have been the better choice for some of the portraits, but it's a toss up. Whilst the photos I did manage to get would have been better, I'm certain that I would have missed many of them without the zoom capabilities or if I had stopped to swap lenses.

Helpful comments, thanks and I'll learn for next time.

Pentaxophile

Link Posted 30/12/2011 - 15:09
I rush too much too. I feel a bit sensitive about annoying my subjects or (in other countries) making them feel like 'tourist exhibits' so frequently walk away knowing I could have done better. But it's the thought of doing it better next time that keeps me coming back to photography!

Another advantage of a prime, though, is it does buy you a little more time. It feels less intrusive somehow, than a stonking great zoom. I am tending to stick a prime on and then seek opportunities for shooting with that lens, and simply accept that some opportunities will be lost. I find the better quality and 'character' of the prime lens shots does tend to make up for the losses.
[link=https://500px.com/will_brealey/[/link]
Last Edited by Pentaxophile on 30/12/2011 - 15:16

snappychappy

Link Posted 30/12/2011 - 16:09
Also like the three girl bhuddist shot. A very nice set and you have captured a good flavor of the country.
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piotro

Link Posted 30/12/2011 - 16:17
I like these portraits, also last one (temple).
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puma

Link Posted 30/12/2011 - 16:26
Very beautiful and lovely colours. realy nice shots well done
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milamber

Link Posted 31/12/2011 - 08:43
Thanks for the kind and helpful comments everyone. I should have mentioned that these are all jpeg - I don't shoot in raw. If anyone can see where shooting in raw might have helped with any of the shots I'd be interested.

As for the colours I have the K-r set to 'reversal film' in the custom image settings. This setting does seem to give very nice colours - I think it's supposed to replicate slide film. I can't comment on that having used slide film just a few times too long ago to remember, but of the custome image settings it's the best for me.

Frogfish

Link Posted 02/01/2012 - 07:16
I enjoyed viewing this set - not technically perfect as the OP admits, but still very enjoyable.

#3 is my favourite - and although I love low DoF shots in this case my taste differs from Pentaxophile's as I actually find the sharply in focus vegetables add to the scene.

I think possibly you do need to work on your compositions though - almost all your portraits are centred and I'd personally like to see them given a little more space in the direction they are facing or positioned off to one side if straight on (the rule of thirds is as good as any to get you started on composition).

Sharpness of the 18-250. Not bad and that's a nice shot of the eagle/hawk but look at the clumping of the feathers, the detail you'd get from a better lens would blow it away so it is a little soft at the long end (at either end from what I've read though not experienced).
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milamber

Link Posted 02/01/2012 - 09:33
Thanks. Actually most of the portraits are centred as a result of cropping before putting them on here. I posted a photo to a competition the other day and one of the comments was that it needed to be cropped to get rid of the unnecessary clutter....

As a result I've cropped the portraits quite tightly and they have all ended up in the centre! I'll have another look at them.

I was, and still am, impressed by the 18-250mm, but have little else to compare it to, except for the 50mm which I haven't used much. I need to have a search through the 1000 or so photos I took, see what range I used the most, then come back here for suggestions.
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