photographing the moon


nickhill1989

Link Posted 20/01/2013 - 19:32
Hi guys
I am here for some advice about taking photos of the moon on my new k30 I used to do this on my compact camera which worked quite well however i want to be able to take better shots then the ones im getting i no that you have to turn the shutter speed down for longer exposure and the iso needs to be down because of the low light situation and you dont want the moon extremely bright. I also not that the aperature needs to be turned down as well, i dont have a tripod yet i shall be getting one soon but i would just love some helpfull hints to take my pictures of the moon to the next level.
Thanks nick

szgabor

Link Posted 20/01/2013 - 21:55
Hi Nick, check this site: link
Regards,
Gábor
My website
My PPG site

Offertonhatter

Link Posted 20/01/2013 - 22:27
Nick, When I took the moon last with my long zoom, I avoided letting the camera set the exposure, preferring to manually set the exposure and aperture. I think if memory served, was ISO200, F8 and 1/250sec. Best thing is to put it in manual and then adjust the shutter speed and leave the aperture set. Take plenty of shots, and you will nail the exposure accordingly. Hope this helps.
Some Cameras

Smeggypants

Link Posted 21/01/2013 - 01:29
nickhill1989 wrote:
Hi guys
I am here for some advice about taking photos of the moon on my new k30 I used to do this on my compact camera which worked quite well however i want to be able to take better shots then the ones im getting i no that you have to turn the shutter speed down for longer exposure and the iso needs to be down because of the low light situation and you dont want the moon extremely bright. I also not that the aperature needs to be turned down as well, i dont have a tripod yet i shall be getting one soon but i would just love some helpfull hints to take my pictures of the moon to the next level.
Thanks nick

Buzz Aldrin is probably the best person to help out on that one.
[i]Bodies: 1x K-5IIs, 2x K-5, Sony TX-5, Nokia 808
Lenses: Pentax DA 10-17mm ED(IF) Fish Eye, Pentax DA 14mm f/2.8, Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8, Pentax-A 28mm f/2.8, Sigma 30mm F1.4 EX DC, Pentax-A 50mm f/1.2, Pentax-A 50mm f/1.4, Pentax-FA 50mm f/1.4, Pentax-A 50mm f/1.7, Pentax DA* 50-135mm f/2.8, Sigma 135-400mm APO DG, and more ..
Flash: AF-540FGZ, Vivitar 283

DaveHolmes

Link Posted 21/01/2013 - 09:39
Offertonhatter wrote:
I think if memory served, was ISO200, F8 and 1/250sec. Best thing is to put it in manual and then adjust the shutter speed and leave the aperture set. Take plenty of shots, and you will nail the exposure accordingly. Hope this helps.

This is where I start when pointing camera at the moon...
Long exposures of the moon often don't go quite right... Partly as it's reflecting light from the sun and partly as it (and the Earth) are in a state of perpetual motion...
........................................................................
Digital:
Pentax K5- Vivitar 19mm 3.8; FA35mm f2; D-Xenon 100mm macro f2.8; DA50-200mm WR...
Flash:
Yongnuo YN-560; Vivitar 285HV; Cactus V4 triggers...
Film:
Pentax-MX & M50mm f1.4; Spottie & 55mm f1.8; MG & M40mm 2.8...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/daveholmesphotos/

GlynM

Link Posted 21/01/2013 - 10:19
As a quick starting point, for getting a working exposure setting, I found setting auto exposure to point works quite well. Metering the moon then sets the moon to around mid grey. You could then try some +ev to get a brighter result or go to manual exposure using the auto exposure value as a starting point for some experimentation.

I also found that reviewing the results on the back of the camera in the dark always makes the results look brighter than when you see them inside on the PC. So I think it is worth trying a first attempt in the garden so that you can whip the camera off of the tripod and go inside for a quick review on the PC.

Glyn

petrochemist

Link Posted 21/01/2013 - 11:13
When just photographing the moon, spot metering has always worked OK for me. In my opinion the moon should be a mid grey, thats roughly the colour of moon rock. Any of the other modes get confused by the sky, which is usually black. The relative proportion of (black) sky & (bright) moon varying hugely with focal length & moon phase.
Aperture makes little difference, if the lens is properly focused, ISO (as always) is best kept reasonally low to prevent noise, but if working at high magnifications short shutter times become important. On several occations I've had the moon leave the field of view in well under a minute. To prevent motion blur through my scope speeds sometimes have to be faster than 1/1000s, though setting the motor drive up right would probably improve things.

Things get more difficult if you want both the moon & foreground detail. HDR techniques, or careful foreground lighting will be required to get both exposed reasonbly. Aperture also becomes much more critical, unless you just cheat with photoshop.
Mike
.
Pentax:K5ii, K7, K100D, DA18-55, DA10-17, DA55-300, DA50-200, F100-300, F50, DA35 AL, 4* M50, 2* M135, Helicoid extension, Tak 300 f4 (& 6 film bodies)
3rd Party: Bigmos (Sigma 150-500mm OS HSM),2* 28mm, 100mm macro, 28-200 zoom, 35-80 zoom, 80-200 zoom, 80-210 zoom, 300mm M42, 600 mirror, 1000-4000 scope, 50mm M42, enlarger lenses, Sony & micro 4/3 cameras with various PK mounts, Zenit E...
Far to many tele-converters, adapters, project parts & extension tubes etc.

.[size=11:].FlickrWPFPanoramio

nickhill1989

Link Posted 21/01/2013 - 12:23
thank you very much for your help guys this will come in hand cheers

screwdriver

Link Posted 23/01/2013 - 14:43
The correct base exposure for the Moon, with clear skies is 1/125th of a second at f8 at 100 ISO, it always is, even a crescent Moon is the same if you don't want to burn out the illuminated crescent. The light reflected off the Moon is a constant, it doesn't vary. Even if the Moon is only a small part of the image, if you want the Moon correctly exposed, the above base settings are what you need.

By base exposure I mean that if you alter one parameter you have to alter one of the other two by the same amount in the opposite direction to keep the balance. For instance my Pentax Q has a lowest ISO of 125 so I would need to compensate by altering one of the other two,in this case 1/100th of a second at f8 at 125 ISO keeps the balance.

To fill your viewfinder with the Moon you need a lens with a focal length of over 2000mm (35mm format) or equivalent.

The small sensor on the Pentax Q is great for this as a 300mm lens gives me a 1650mm lens, this is the result



Moon_Small_01 by screwdriver1, on Flickr

The Moon moves it's own diameter every 5 minutes, so is constantly slowly moving in your viewfinder.

You can see this movement in this video (same setup, Pentax Q with a 300mm lens)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/chris-judge/8407612281/
Chris

Father Ted

Link Posted 23/01/2013 - 16:02
Chris and Mike have summed it up nicely, I can't add anything other than to wrap up warm. At this time of year the night sky can be great to look at and photograph, but by eck, it's cold, too!!
Getting there! Thanks to you guys

Pentax K10d, *istDL, Kit lens ( 18-55mm ), 50mm f1.7 lens, Tamron 70-300mm lens, Prinzflex 70-162 manual lens, Various old flashes.
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