Nettle


coker

Link Posted 30/11/2019 - 14:31
A stinging hair (trichome) approx. 1.5 mm., of the common nettle, Urtica Dioica.

K5, SMC Pentax M 50mm. f1.7 reversed on SMC Pentax M 200mm. f4.
Auto Bellows M, 40mm. extension.
AF280t off-camera diffused flash.
Stack of 17 frames (@ f5.6 on the reversed 50) in Combine ZP.
PP in Elements 11, copy layer high-pass filter, hard-blended.






Thanks for looking, any thoughts welcome,

Roger.
The more I look, the more there is to see!
Last Edited by coker on 30/11/2019 - 14:33

HarisF1

Link Posted 30/11/2019 - 14:38
Nature's weapons, beautifully captured!

RobL

Link Posted 30/11/2019 - 16:17
That is quite a rig! Fabulous result at microscopic scale, any idea of the magnification?

LennyBloke

Link Posted 30/11/2019 - 16:24
You've perfected a great technique - the magnification and detail is incredible, I like the classic black background too, really sets off the "icy" sharp sting
LennyBloke

Lubbyman

Link Posted 30/11/2019 - 16:45
Very, very impressive. Almost oozing with formic acid and histamines! I'm in awe both of your technique and the common stinging nettle.

Your picture is much better than the one used to illustrate 'Why do nettles sting' in an on-line teaching resource 'Science and Plants for Schools' (www.saps.org.uk). Have you ever thought about making some of your pictures avaiable for educational purposes? They certainly have the 'Wow!' factor that can make science interesting for children.

Steve

coker

Link Posted 30/11/2019 - 18:46
Thank you, you're all most kind!

I would say between 6x & 7x, Rob.

I take snaps just for the pleasure of it all, Steve, & I wouldn't know where to start down the road of "making them available".....

Roger.
The more I look, the more there is to see!
Last Edited by coker on 30/11/2019 - 18:48

RobL

Link Posted 30/11/2019 - 19:36
coker wrote:
Thank you, you're all most kind!

I would say between 6x & 7x, Rob.

I take snaps just for the pleasure of it all, Steve, & I wouldn't know where to start down the road of "making them available".....

Roger.

You could try stock photography sites, the main ones like Shutterstock and Adobe Stock get global coverage but maybe there are specialist ones for botany, and they pay a modest fee each time someone downloads. Shutterstock shows where your photos have been downloaded which gives me more pleasure than the occasional payment, photos of my garden plants for instance have been used all over Europe and Russia and occasionally other continents.

davidwozhere

Link Posted 01/12/2019 - 00:59
That's a fantastic reward for the trouble you went to there. The detail is truly remarkable.
Did you move the focus ring, the bellows extension or the subject to make the stack?
Both the *istDS and the K5 are incurably addicted to old glass

My page on Photocrowd - link

08tiger

Link Posted 01/12/2019 - 06:24
Wow, thats really something.
What a lovely detailed shot of something that caused sooo much grief when I was a kid and beyond.
C&C welcome.
Don.

coker

Link Posted 01/12/2019 - 08:46
Yes Don, they're very efficient at fulfilling the design brief!!

I focus with the ring on the 200mm., Steve.
It's a little complicated to explain, I'll put a shot of the arrangement up layer on........

Thanks for taking the time & the interest shown,

Roger.
The more I look, the more there is to see!

Sry

Link Posted 01/12/2019 - 16:04
What a surreal image. Raw flesh sprouting a glass bird of some kind - or any of many other imaginings... Rather unsettling, this one (which I like!).

thingsthatihaveseen

Link Posted 01/12/2019 - 17:01
Very good indeed... fascinating result...

Best
Bill

BillWardPhotography
Instagram
Facebook

K10D

Link Posted 01/12/2019 - 17:09
Excellent result from a masterful approach. Well executed and processed. Impressive image worthy of the efforts involved.

Best regards
cameradextrous _ Motorcycles etc. link
Add a Comment
You must be registered or logged-in to comment.