Monopod


sportyman531

Link Posted 13/10/2021 - 23:04
When using a tripod the advice is to switch off shake reduction but what about when using a monopod, SR on or off?
flickr ID: SteveW46243 or sw46246
DA AL 35mm f2.4, K3,18-135 WR, DA 55-300, Pentax KX, K5 x 2, 18-50 50-200 kit lenses, Tamron 17-50 f2.8, Fuji X10, 2x Mamiya 1000s 2x 80mm f2.8, 150mm f3.5, 210mm f4, Yashica 124G TLR, 2x Yashica FX3 Super 2000, Tamron 28mm f2.8, 90mm SP f2.5, 135mm f2.5, Olympus 35RC, 2x Yashica FX2, Kodak Pocket Instamatic, Kodak Box Brownie

pschlute

Link Posted 14/10/2021 - 00:28
I think the advice will vary with the camera model. As SR has improved and takes its analysis from more axes, the later models may suggest to leave SR enabled as the camera will recognise what you are doing. Earlier models I think turn it off.

To be honest I reckon your best approach is to practice first and see which gives you the best method.
Peter



My Flickr page

RobL

Link Posted 14/10/2021 - 09:36
Good advice from pschlute, although I would leave SR on with a monopod; after all it helps to steady the camera especially with a long lens but it is not static as on a tripod. Nothing though beats a high shutter speed for sharp images in such a situation.

Lubbyman

Link Posted 14/10/2021 - 10:47
Agree with both the above. There's no substitute for trying both with and without SR and finding which works best for you. Take shots of the sort of thing you use a monopod for, both with and without SR, and repeat each several times (SR won't get it right every time, it's a matter of probabilities, so mustn't judge it on the basis of one or two shots). Shouldn't take more than half an hour. The way you shake with a monopod (and I mean it seriously!) may not be the same as how I do, so what works for you may not work for me and vice versa. In fact, when I use a monopod the biggest involuntary movement is small forwards and backwards motion and SR can't handle that. Not a big problem for landscapes, but a pain for close up/macro...

Steve

Chrism8

Link Posted 14/10/2021 - 14:44
To add to the comment's above,

I use a monopod generally with a longer lens such as a Pentax 150 - 450 to aid steadiness particularly at max lens length and low-ish light levels without increasing the ISO to much, where light is low and I have moving targets in range, I'll go for a higher ISO and up the shutter speed and reduce any noise in post.

If the target is fairly stationary it'll be a tripod and as low a shutter speed / ISO combi to get the effect I'm after.

There's no substitute for practice which will improve your technique both with a monopod and or handholding a big lens and getting sharp results.
Chris

www.chrismillsphotography.co.uk

" A Hangover is something that occupies the Head you neglected to use the night before".

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K1 - Sigma 85mm F1.4, Pentax DFA 150 -450 F4.5 / 5.6, Pentax DFA* 24 - 70 F2.8

Sigma 100-300 F4, Samyang 14mm F2.8, Pentax DFA* 70-200 F2.8

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sportyman531

Link Posted 14/10/2021 - 23:45
Thanks for the advice everyone, I will go out on a "test run".
flickr ID: SteveW46243 or sw46246
DA AL 35mm f2.4, K3,18-135 WR, DA 55-300, Pentax KX, K5 x 2, 18-50 50-200 kit lenses, Tamron 17-50 f2.8, Fuji X10, 2x Mamiya 1000s 2x 80mm f2.8, 150mm f3.5, 210mm f4, Yashica 124G TLR, 2x Yashica FX3 Super 2000, Tamron 28mm f2.8, 90mm SP f2.5, 135mm f2.5, Olympus 35RC, 2x Yashica FX2, Kodak Pocket Instamatic, Kodak Box Brownie
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