Looking for good but inexpensive frames...


Dangermouse

Link Posted 01/04/2010 - 18:12
The problem I have always had with home-made frames is the inevitable ragged edges on the mitres. Any hints on how to avoid this? The only thing I've ever managed to make splinter-free cuts in wood with is a hacksaw (due to the very fine teeth)!

If you have a builder's merchant nearby they may be able to cut glass to order, which is well worth it compared to the hassle of trying to score and cut without ending up with a horrible mess.

I'm not completely ham-fisted, having built a fair number of models over the years and being pretty handy with anything mechanical. The materials used for picture frames, however, seem determined never to let me win!
Matt

Shooting the Welsh Wilderness with K-m, KX, MX, ME Super and assorted lenses.

angeladavies

Link Posted 01/04/2010 - 19:27
Hubby ordered a frame, with mount and glass from Cadremont, is yet to arrive, it's a 16x20 I think - so will update when it turns up. He just bought a new cannon camera as well (1,700 - that I didnt knew we had money for - iun fact I know we dont ....) I'll get him to take a shot and post it here

PeteL

Link Posted 02/04/2010 - 10:11
Dangermouse wrote:
The problem I have always had with home-made frames is the inevitable ragged edges on the mitres. Any hints on how to avoid this? The only thing I've ever managed to make splinter-free cuts in wood with is a hacksaw (due to the very fine teeth)!

If you have a builder's merchant nearby they may be able to cut glass to order, which is well worth it compared to the hassle of trying to score and cut without ending up with a horrible mess.

I'm not completely ham-fisted, having built a fair number of models over the years and being pretty handy with anything mechanical. The materials used for picture frames, however, seem determined never to let me win!

The link that i provided will cut the Mitres for you. I certainly would not recommend a Mitre Box and Saw They are Ok for houshold DIY but that`s about all!
I still have my Pootatuck Lion Trimmer which is a small version of those used by pro carpenters. When i used to Paint i wanted to sell a few in local shops but at the time a good quality frame would set me back 40, A lot of money to tie up. So after experimenting with buying plain Moulding and staining/Varnishing it myself, I concluded it was just as cheap to buy my own ready coloured moulding. The problem with cheap frames from shops is that the rebate is too shallow to accept 2mm Glass, Mounting Board (X2 in my pics) and a 2mm MDF backing so this was never an option for me.At the time i was able to produce Frames identical to the Pro Framers for 12. As i was selling 3 or 4 paintings per month the trimmer soon paid for itself. In fact the offcuts of moulding gave me a free frame for each 4 that i made.
The finest Saw i have ever used is a modellers Razor Saw but i doubt it would be entirely suitable.
Regards - Pete

Regards - Pete
Last Edited by PeteL on 02/04/2010 - 10:13

Pentaxophile

Link Posted 02/04/2010 - 10:48
I am sure that anyone trying to make their own frames will soon realise that the money professional picture framers charge is well earned.

My sister is having to close her little picture framing shop and gallery, but she is going to keep the equipment as she has a list of steady clients who value her 'eye' for what type of frame and mount will work best for their work.

If you do have a little gallery and framing shop near to you, why not support it? You might even be able to sell some of your prints through it- my sister was always open to displaying work by local artists and photographers.
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PeteL

Link Posted 02/04/2010 - 16:35
Pentaxophile wrote:
I am sure that anyone trying to make their own frames will soon realise that the money professional picture framers charge is well earned.

My sister is having to close her little picture framing shop and gallery, but she is going to keep the equipment as she has a list of steady clients who value her 'eye' for what type of frame and mount will work best for their work.

If you do have a little gallery and framing shop near to you, why not support it? You might even be able to sell some of your prints through it- my sister was always open to displaying work by local artists and photographers.

I agree entirely, People see framed prints being sold for just a few pounds and cannot understand why good quality Frames are so costly in comparison. I only framed my own paintings, Any one asking simply for frames were directed to a small local business.
It is surprisingly time hungry - and for me quite a logistical exercise to buy my materials, (Pre- internet). I had to travel 7 miles to the undertakers who supplied glass, 17 miles to a hardware shop for Moulding and most of the other bits and pieces then 21 miles to an art shop for mounting board! If i had a large painting to frame i had to use a different Art shop 27 miles away. Needless to say i tied in these visits with other activities and bought sufficient materials for several frames each time. But to present my work in such quality frames would have been prohibitively expensive if i were to rely on professionally made frames.But if i were to pass on the whole cost in manhours that it took me to make the frames it would be costing at least as much if not considerably more!

Regards - Pete
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