k20d


roy1234

Link Posted 11/06/2009 - 21:08
Received my new k20d body today, first thing i noticed is how much heaver it is to the 100d, also i was not aware that you cannot use the ordinary rechargeable r6 batteries, so i have ordered two more of the k20 type, can you tell me how long the batteries last for before they need renewing
also what purpose do the raw button serve, why would you want to shoot in raw if you are using jpeg format.lots of bells and whistles on the k20 any suggestions for me that i need to watch out for?

jackitec

Link Posted 11/06/2009 - 21:11
Read the manual it does lots I have 2 of them

Blincodave

Link Posted 11/06/2009 - 21:27
It could be worth you downloading this K20 E-book for $5. I have the K10 book and it is very useful as an introduction and certainly much better than the Pentax manual. I'm sure it will answer many of your questions.

http://www.k10dbook.com/Purchase%20K20D.htm

Dave

loskeran

Link Posted 11/06/2009 - 21:42
Try this book from the Forum "shop" Magic Lantern Guides 15 for the K20.
It is written in good English and easy to understand.

jackitec

Link Posted 11/06/2009 - 22:05
Loskeran just bought this book and I'm not impressed, the original manual is all you need,

Oggy

Link Posted 11/06/2009 - 23:01
Hi Roy

My shutter count is about 4500 and I have charged my battery about 8 times

Nearly all AF, several flash.

loskeran

Link Posted 12/06/2009 - 08:28
jackitec wrote:
Loskeran just bought this book and I'm not impressed, the original manual is all you need,

Hi Jack, I depends on what level you are at, and is explanatory on those words and and abbreviations that are used., for someone new to DSLRs it is an easy read
To some just starting with an SLR it is a very big learning curve, so a book that starts with stuff that many of us have for second nature now is not a bad thing, how many go into stores like Jessops get a very expensive Canon/Nikon stuffed in there hands and after a very short time give up because they cant take shots like the professionals do, after all the idiot in the shop told them it was a pro camera, and they expect it to take the shots for them, Just press the button and it does it all for you, after all they were told it was the best bit of kit!
So in a "nutshell" if new to DSLR's learn before you make a big mistake and then say "This camera is no good".
I am not a good reader but I have just sent a load of my old books to a charity shop, They taught me loads, but I am still trying to get it right

roy1234

Link Posted 12/06/2009 - 10:09
Thank you for your feedback, i am not new to photography i had my 100d for about 18months...I probably did not explain properly.

the 50d has a facility for taking in JPEG+RAW or just raw or jpeg I can understand the later two as this was also on the 100d what i
wanted to know is what is the advantage of having a facility for taking
both JPEG+RAW. together, surly you would only want one or the other why both? I would like to know if any of you use this system (raw+jpeg) and if so what advantage you get from it.
Also there are times that things crop up that are not mentioned in the instruction book, that is why i asked is there anything that i need to be wary of..... thank you for your time

El Dingo

Link Posted 12/06/2009 - 13:10
I sometimes take RAW + JPEG as JPG files can be reviewed quickly on almost any computer with a card reader or USB slot (if you have the cable with you).

Handy if you are at someones house and they don't have picture editing software with a RAW plug-in or Pentax Photo Browser installed.
El Dingo - K3-II and K10D

roy1234

Link Posted 12/06/2009 - 14:38
Thanks for your reply....if that is what it is for i can disregard it , i thought i was missing out on something special

fccwpe

Link Posted 13/06/2009 - 07:19
Blincodave wrote:
It could be worth you downloading this K20 E-book for $5. I have the K10 book and it is very useful as an introduction and certainly much better than the Pentax manual. I'm sure it will answer many of your questions.

http://www.k10dbook.com/Purchase%20K20D.htm

Dave

I got the book and Yvonne knows his stuff. Another nice thing is that he tells you how great the camera is in addition to giving excellent examples.
__________________

K20D, SMC DA 18-55mm AL II, SMC DA 16-45mm, Tamron LD Di 70-300mm, ROK 800mm Mirror, D-BG2 battery grip, Kenko 2X teleconverter, loads of batteries. Sony DSC-R1 (Excellent portrait camera!), Sony HVL-F32X flash.

sanderscapes

Link Posted 13/06/2009 - 07:24
Hope you enjoy your k20 roy

Unlocker

Link Posted 13/06/2009 - 09:39
roy1234 wrote:
Thank you for your feedback, i am not new to photography i had my 100d for about 18months...I probably did not explain properly.

the 50d has a facility for taking in JPEG+RAW or just raw or jpeg I can understand the later two as this was also on the 100d what i
wanted to know is what is the advantage of having a facility for taking
both JPEG+RAW. together, surly you would only want one or the other why both? I would like to know if any of you use this system (raw+jpeg) and if so what advantage you get from it.
Also there are times that things crop up that are not mentioned in the instruction book, that is why i asked is there anything that i need to be wary of..... thank you for your time

You can see the benefits of both formats, JPEG and RAW, and there is your answer, you get both. How YOU decide to use it is upto you, and for you it may be pointless, but it has it's uses.

You may be shooting casually, then see that shot that might really be worth some effort, hit the RAW button, then you have both files, when you get home you have the RAW if it was a good shot, if not you haven't missed out.

You may be with friends that might want a print of some shots from somewhere like Boots before you get home, you would need JPEG for that, but if you are a RAW shooter, you have both.

The most useful application I have found so far was shooting a friends wedding. We took around 1200 shots between us, and we shot in RAW + JPEG, but, we set the JPEG to only be 2MP in size. This meant that when we gave them a copy of every shot for review, we could easily fit them all on a 2GB usb stick.

There are many other reasons I'm sure, but just do what works for you. Personally with fast memory cards so cheap I always shoot RAW + maximum size & quality JPEG. I don't do a lot of PP, and I'm becoming more inclined to just use the JPEG, due to skill level, and just plain being bothered. But, if I find a shot that deserves some effort I always have the RAW file. It helps when you have 4x 1TB drives in your machine as well!

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roy1234

Link Posted 13/06/2009 - 11:22
Your advice has got me thinking unlocker. and it makes sense...i am from the old school and still use an exposure meter, with the camera on manual,
very rarely do i need much pp on the end result, after reading what you wrote i will keep on jpeg, with the bracket facility. only using raw on as you say special light cognitions, thanks for that, i will let you know how i get on, and if it works for me.

jps

Link Posted 14/06/2009 - 09:05
I nearly always shoot in RAW, but one feature I find really useful on the K20D is the in-camera RAW to JPEG development (though I never really thought I'd use it when I bought the camera). It's particularly handy in situations where you are away from a computer - I've used it at friends' houses when someone wants a copy of a picture immediately.

It allows you to change many parameters (sharpness, contrast, saturation, picture style, exposure, noise control etc. etc.) - I particularly like converting to B&W, adding some exposure & upping the contrast to get a high key portrait from a low light situation.

This doesn't replace proper RAW post processing, but it's a great option to have for such situations.

Jonathan
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