It just dropped in...


Lubbyman

Link Posted 17/07/2022 - 21:46
One of the young herring gulls that were born behind the chimney of nextdoor-but-one dropped in this afternoon. Literally. It clearly knew that it was meant to fly, but having done the downward bit into our back garden, it didn't have the ability to take off and fly well enough to clear the surrounding fences and shrubs. So it spent most of the afternoon in the garden alternately:
- Crying for its parents, who knew where offspring was and screamed at it loudly and often.
- Exploring, including the veg patch, pond/wildlife area, nettles (for wildlife of course), inside the greenhouse and the depths of a blackcurrant bush (a result of the bird trying to fly and perch on top if it).
- Looking, but not quite daring to go through an open doorway into the covered passage between the house and garage.
- Looking very puzzled at a bloke with a real camera and his wife with a phone camera.
- Having a quick nap.
It didn't seem worried by my presence, just curious. Several times it was within a couple of yards of me. Perhaps it now regards me as an honorary member of its family . It seems to have managed to leave the garden now, or at least it's being very quiet - we were beginning to think that the night might be noisy as well as very hot .

Anyway, here are a few pictures of the not-so-little thing. Not exactly award winning photography. And definitely not 'bird in flight' - well, how can you when the bird itself can't work out how to do it?? And yes, that is a tripod in the last picture, the camera trap for the hedgehogs is on it.

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Steve

Flan

Link Posted 17/07/2022 - 22:10
number 3 Lubbyman, my heart has the connection
I hope the little innocent survives
ive had the same experience before, with swallows and robins who decided my place was good for digs

Lubbyman

Link Posted 18/07/2022 - 11:58
It's still here! Turned out it had spent the night trapped between my chain-link garden fence and the solid wooden fence erected by a neighbour about 9 inches inside their territory. I managed to get it out this morning without any damage to the bird or me. So it's back to wandering around the garden exchanging squarks with parents...

Steve

Urbanmeister

Link Posted 19/07/2022 - 13:54
Very nice pictures, Lubbyman. Like Flan, I hope the gull survives.
Be well, stay safe.

Lubbyman

Link Posted 19/07/2022 - 15:35
Thanks for looking - and for your concern for the gull. It was around first thing this morning, looking quite concerned that the tray of water we had put out for it was dry (Mrs L did then fill it up). It hasn't been seen or heard since mid-morning. However, later in the morning Mrs L saw a young 'un on our guttering being fed by an adult. Presumably it has learned that continuing to flap its wings brings big rewards and is now up, up and away.

Steve

pschlute

Link Posted 20/07/2022 - 07:42
Lovely shots and lovely story. Sometimes a little help makes the difference between survival or death.

You are now official foster parents
Peter



My Flickr page

Lubbyman

Link Posted 20/07/2022 - 09:16
Thanks. The foster parent bit concerns me though - children have a habit of returning and expecting to be fed!!

It was an interesting photographic experience. When the gull appeared, I didn't expect it to say long so quickly grabbed the camera and put on the DA*300mm + 1.4 TC - well, that's what you use for birds, isn't it? It never crossed my mind that it might not be ideal for an almost fully grown herring gull that wasn't afraid of getting close to humans. Those head and shoulder portraits were not cropped vertically. I never managed to get a shot with the entire bird in the frame. Should have put the 55-300mm in the pocket when I grabbed the camera. It's also that first time I've wished I had a 150-450mm, it's still too heavy a beast for me but for these shots I was sitting down .

Steve

pschlute

Link Posted 20/07/2022 - 09:44
Lubbyman wrote:
Thanks. The foster parent bit concerns me though - children have a habit of returning and expecting to be fed!!

When I was a kid my dad kept birds in aviaries in the garden.... budgies and exotic finches. So if ever an injured wild bird was found in the village it would end up at our home for recuperation. One young Blackbird was nursed back to health. My dad used to be home at 4 pm every day and would feed it. When it was fit enough to be released he set it free. The following day at 4 pm it returned calling out to be fed. It would land on my dad's hand and spend a good few minutes eating before flying away. This continued for three months, every day at the same time.
Peter



My Flickr page
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