I saw this on another forum


K10D

Link Posted 03/11/2018 - 08:03
A different approach to photographing birds

link

Best regards
cameradextrous _ Motorcycles etc. link

spinno

Link Posted 03/11/2018 - 08:11
Wowser! Great abstract images, probably no two ever the same.
David

JohnX

Link Posted 03/11/2018 - 09:08
Time lapse?

Nigelk

Link Posted 03/11/2018 - 09:16
Wow! How great are they! Stunning individual work.

MikeInDevon

Link Posted 03/11/2018 - 10:10
Thanks for posting this, fabulous!

Regards
Mike

walt

Link Posted 03/11/2018 - 10:10
What a great creative look. Thanks for the link.
Walt
Flickr
Picasa

swarf

Link Posted 03/11/2018 - 10:18
Brilliant - thanks for providing the link.

Phil
K-5iiS; K-r; ME Super; ME; DA* 16-50 f2.8; DA 18-135 WR; DA 55-300 WR; HD DA 15mm F4 ED AL Limited; FA 50mm f1.4; A50mm f1.7; DAL 18-55mm; M40mm f2.8; + assorted non-Pentax lenses

My Flikr Page link

JohnX

Link Posted 03/11/2018 - 10:27
To answer my own question - how?

Bou snaps hundreds of photos of birds in flight and stitches them together in Photoshop, compressing several seconds of movement into one frame.

Bou realized he needed to combine multiple shots, a technique that draws on the chronophotography that Étienne-Jules Marey and Eadweard Muybridge pioneered in the 19th century. It worked exactly as he envisioned.

Bou uses a variety of cameras, including a Sony F27 and Blackmagic Ursa Mini 4K, and shoots 30 to 60 frames per second. A final image might include more than 600 shots woven together into amazing patterns—the black slash of starlings, the lazy loops of storks, the frenetic lines of swifts. The shapes are as varied and beautiful as the birds that created them.
Last Edited by JohnX on 03/11/2018 - 10:28

ilovesaabs

Link Posted 03/11/2018 - 21:06
I recognise the waterfall, as might a few folk on here - Skogafoss
AKA Welshwizard/PWynneJ
Assorted Pentax/Nikon/Mamiya stuff

derek897

Link Posted 04/11/2018 - 03:54
ilovesaabs wrote:
I recognise the waterfall, as might a few folk on here - Skogafoss

Well spotted,
I'd say the series was probably shot in Iceland, as there's at least 3 others shot there too,
Looks like Vik black sand beach, stack at Vik and ice lagoon as well.
I know what i like, If not always why.

Jonathan-Mac

Link Posted 04/11/2018 - 09:32
Very cool. I imagine a product of combining images taken at very short intervals.
Pentax hybrid user - Digital K3 & K200D, film 645 and 35mm SLR and Pentax (&other) lenses adapted to Fuji X digital
Fan of DA limited and old manual lenses

RobL

Link Posted 04/11/2018 - 11:24
I suppose the results are better than combining individual frames from a video?

Sry

Link Posted 04/11/2018 - 13:17
Nice work indeed!

kea828

Link Posted 24/11/2018 - 18:25
JohnX wrote:
To answer my own question - how?

Bou snaps hundreds of photos of birds in flight and stitches them together in Photoshop, compressing several seconds of movement into one frame.

Bou realized he needed to combine multiple shots, a technique that draws on the chronophotography that Étienne-Jules Marey and Eadweard Muybridge pioneered in the 19th century. It worked exactly as he envisioned.

Bou uses a variety of cameras, including a Sony F27 and Blackmagic Ursa Mini 4K, and shoots 30 to 60 frames per second. A final image might include more than 600 shots woven together into amazing patterns—the black slash of starlings, the lazy loops of storks, the frenetic lines of swifts. The shapes are as varied and beautiful as the birds that created them.

Could this effect be made by using multiple exposures?
Regards,
Kea828

JohnX

Link Posted 24/11/2018 - 19:43
He shoots 30-60 frames per second, then stitches them together in Photoshop.
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