How to remove a stuck filter - 3 methods


RocketNewYork

Link Posted 16/04/2011 - 02:24
If the worst has happened and you have a filter on your lens that refuses to budge you have several methods for removal. This worked on a Canon f1.2 85mm lens that got stuck last week.


The Grip Method 1

1, On a flat table, attach a rubber strap wrench to the filter, Your hand should be holding onto the lens from below.

2, Apply pressure and twist slowly.

3, If nothing happens, add small drops of Teflon to the seal between the lens and filter. Try not to get any on the rubber strap.


The Grip Method 2

1, Using a bench mounted clamp and round shim piece hold the filter face down. The filter should be very secure.

2, By hand, twist the lens the correct way.

3, If this doesn't work, try using the strap wrench.



Sawing the Filter Off

This is the most time consuming and risky approach. It should only be used when everything else has failed.

1, Take the lens off the camera.

2, Tape up the body with masking tape. This stops dust getting in.

3, Tap at the edges of the glass (not the centre) until broken. Using a glass cutter first to score the edges helps this.

4, Remove glass by pulling the parts outwards.

5, Pack the exposed glass lens with cotton pads or balls. Anything soft will do. You are wanting to stop metal filing getting in.

6, Using a fine, metal hacksaw cut into the filter metal. Make sure you don't cut into the lens! You should aim to make at least 8 evenly spaced cuts. This helps the filter flex and bend.

7, Using clamps, twist the filter until it pops out.

8, Remove all dust using a blower (not compressed air) and remove the tape.


Keep in mind that with some lens the front element will want to unscrew. After you have removed the filter it is worth making sure the lens has not been pushed out of alignment. A proper focus check is worth while.

Don

Link Posted 16/04/2011 - 02:51
you forgot the first method.... take a piece of neoprene (like a mouse pad) press the lens filter into the rubber neoprene and turn...

next time don't be silly, just turn it on, don't over tighten it.
Fired many shots. Didn't kill anything.

Algernon

Link Posted 16/04/2011 - 09:26
Blue-Tak grips better than most things.
Half Man... Half Pentax ... Half Cucumber

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Algi

Mike-P

Link Posted 16/04/2011 - 12:44
I found pressing the filter into my wife's flip flop and turning to be quite successful.
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Glover

Link Posted 16/04/2011 - 16:33
Elastic bands around the filter, also putting the lens in the freezer for a bit is supposed to free it up
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Smeggypants

Link Posted 16/04/2011 - 16:39
Mike-P wrote:
I found pressing the filter into my wife's flip flop and turning to be quite successful.

Now there's a euphemism I haven't heard before
[i]Bodies: 1x K-5IIs, 2x K-5, Sony TX-5, Nokia 808
Lenses: Pentax DA 10-17mm ED(IF) Fish Eye, Pentax DA 14mm f/2.8, Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8, Pentax-A 28mm f/2.8, Sigma 30mm F1.4 EX DC, Pentax-A 50mm f/1.2, Pentax-A 50mm f/1.4, Pentax-FA 50mm f/1.4, Pentax-A 50mm f/1.7, Pentax DA* 50-135mm f/2.8, Sigma 135-400mm APO DG, and more ..
Flash: AF-540FGZ, Vivitar 283

Don

Link Posted 16/04/2011 - 16:48
well it it come to filters, tripod legs, lightstands, and many other photo related items, I've never understood why people feel compelled to torque them on.

A filter you should simply spin it on until it stops turning... apply no torque at all... you are supposed to take it off and put it away when you are done with it, not leave it on.

tripod legs need to be turned until snug then a little bit of torque for like like an eighth to a quarter turn to ensure the legs don't slip. Same with ball heads and video heads...

light stands need to be tightened the same way.
your flash heads should offer resistance but still be movable if you try to reposition the flash head.

over-tightening just leads to premature wear out or breakage of equipment.

to me this entire thread should be titled "Here are some solutions to one of the easiest problems to avoid"

the only time a serious photographer should encounter this problem, is if they just bout a used item from somebody that doesn't know any better.
Fired many shots. Didn't kill anything.
Last Edited by Don on 16/04/2011 - 16:54

Hardgravity

Link Posted 16/04/2011 - 17:07
Mike-P wrote:
I found pressing the filter into my wife's flip flop and turning to be quite successful.

Was she wearing it?

Did she twist her foot or did you twist the lens?

Is this a daft comment?
Cheers, HG

K110+DA40, K200+DA35, K3 and a bag of lenses, bodies and other bits.

Mustn't forget the Zenits, or folders, or...

I've some gallerieshere CLICKY LINK! and my PPG entries.
Last Edited by Hardgravity on 16/04/2011 - 17:07

Mike-P

Link Posted 16/04/2011 - 17:10
Don wrote:

A filter you should simply spin it on until it stops turning... apply no torque at all... you are supposed to take it off and put it away when you are done with it, not leave it on.

Mine was when I was in Spain .. no pressure was applied whatsoever when screwing the filter on. I presumed it was down to the heat.

Hardgravity wrote:

Is this a daft comment?

Yup
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Cisco

Link Posted 16/04/2011 - 17:17
CPLs are the worst ! You have to rotate them to use them ! then they won't let go when you try to take them off
K-7 | K10 | DA 18-135 | DA 18-250 | DA 55-300 | DFA 100 |
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