Airshow advise


john941

Link Posted 21/07/2011 - 13:29
I've just read Tony Shaps article on shooting at a airshow and I can't agree with most of it.
In the first place he recomends setting the shutter speed to 1/4000sec to freeze the propellor, many a good photo has been spoilt by having the props static on a aircraft in flight, anyway how often can you use 1/4000sec in the uk.

He then goes on to say the best view of an aircraft is head on, check out the aviation sites not many are head on. An 18-200mm lens maybe all right on the side of the runway when they are landing, but here on the west coast the air shows are over water and you need a lens longer than 200mm.

Finally after reading many articles on useing SR when panning I think the jury is still out on that one. Myself I don't use sr at air shows
and some of my best shots of aircraft were taken with the K10 which as you know is without SR.

johnriley

Link Posted 21/07/2011 - 13:39
The K10D does have SR, but I agree for the subjects being shot it could be turned off.
Best regards, John

Mike-P

Link Posted 21/07/2011 - 13:48
All my K10D aircraft shots (and the few K-7 pics) were taken with SR enabled.

As for freezing the propellor ... total madness, I always shoot at 1/125th (and 99% of the time the pic is side on).
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john941

Link Posted 21/07/2011 - 13:49
I stand corrected on the k10 John Thanks. That was 4 camera's back for me I remember now I kept forgetting to switch it on at the best of times.
Cheers john941

Crossed-up

Link Posted 21/07/2011 - 13:53
john941 wrote:
I've just read Tony Shaps article on shooting at a airshow and I can't agree with most of it.
In the first place he recomends setting the shutter speed to 1/4000sec to freeze the propellor, many a good photo has been spoilt by having the props static on a aircraft in flight, anyway how often can you use 1/4000sec in the uk.


I agree with you entirely. I can't access the article as I am not a Plus member, but I immediately thought the frozen propellor picture 'advertising' the article looked like a prime example of what to avoid! It's the same with motorsport pictures, I like to see the wheels in motion and blurring to give a sense of dynamics and speed. Admittedly there time when you want to freeze the action, such as capturing the flying gravel from a rally car. I guess it's question of personal taste and preference again.
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Pwynnej

Link Posted 21/07/2011 - 13:54
The article didn't come up to expectations....it was along the lines of I've taken photos for years, bought a K20D plus an 18-200 went down to the local airfield...most of the advice is common sense really but didn't tell anyone much they didn't know already..

Having done Flying Legends at Duxford recently, things that matter:

shooting mostly with the sun behind the aircraft, what exposure compensation do you need? the runway is south of the public area so you have to live with facing the sun...

200 mm is wholly inadequate, I was going to use the DA*60-250 for the formation and close shots until it died, then I was left with the D3 + 300 or 70-200 + 1.7x, even then the aircraft looked small on screen....

Since during an air display there are a lot of things that block people's view there's a chance of view being obscured by obstacle....research into where the best place to view the aircraft taxiing or flying by goes a long way...

And as Jon941 says, exposure depends on the weather on the day, cloudy and you'd struggle to get 1/4000th, too much sun and you have blown out sky to maintain detail in the plane....
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beakynet

Link Posted 21/07/2011 - 13:56
I actually stopped reading the article!

The last air show I went to the Tamron 75-300 stayed on the camera the entire time and I set the dial to shutter priority and set 1/200th and SR on. Out of about 125 shots, only about 5 suffered from shake related blurring! The low level ones benefitted from showing movement in the background with the aircraft sharp.

With some of the older aircraft I did find that some of the prop bluring could have been more.
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Pwynnej

Link Posted 21/07/2011 - 14:01
beakynet wrote:
I actually stopped reading the article!

The last air show I went to the Tamron 75-300 stayed on the camera the entire time and I set the dial to shutter priority and set 1/200th and SR on. Out of about 125 shots, only about 5 suffered from shake related blurring! The low level ones benefitted from showing movement in the background with the aircraft sharp.

With some of the older aircraft I did find that some of the prop bluring could have been more.

I read it to the end, expecting something earth shattering
Z-1p, K-1, P50
F50 1.7. FAs 24, 35, 50 1.4, 85, 135. DFA15-30, DFA24-70, D-FA*70-200. D-FA 100 (gone now!). The SMC-FA Limited Trinity.
Metz 45 CL-4, AF500FTZ. AF540FGZ.
Some Mamiya and some Nikon
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