A 'Reminder' for FILM USERS ---


Peter Elgar

Link Posted 10/03/2021 - 08:30
I develop B&W film for Forum members and a little C41 colour negative at a Pinch and so many times the sender gets terrible results. Very Faint Density, 'Greening Effect' on C41 XP2 400 types and it causes my worry in case it id MY chemicals so I have to do a 'test' on my chemicals to 'put my mind t rest ' !!
1. Please Cold Store your films in a Fridge until you want to use them -- packs of 10 can go in the FREEZER even
2. Please do not leave films in Cameras un-developed for years -- here is the effect known as 'Latent Image Regression' where the atoms of Silver Halides exposed to 'Photons of LIGHT' as a snap is taken 'Decay' and the Silver Grain can no longer be formed by the Developing Agents.
3. if your film is 'Outdated' you must give it MORE EXPOSURE as the Sensitivity declines over years.
4. Colour negative, slide or B&W 'Chromogenic' films suffer from exposure to 'Fumes' in a house over years-- can be from Sprays, Furniture Glue etc etc which will cause 'Greening', a High Fog Level and Loss of Image Density -- so 'Careful Storage ' please !
Attached image example of XP2 400 Super 'GREENED'


been a member of Pentax Club since the Ron Spillman era! Got COMPUTERISED at last - DIGITISED? Taken the PLUNGE - BUT FILM STILL RULES !!!

Jonathan-Mac

Link Posted 10/03/2021 - 09:49
Some good advice for anyone using film, especially keeping it cold. I keep shot film in the fridge until I'm ready to develop it.
Pentax hybrid user - Digital K3 & K200D, film 645 and 35mm SLR and Pentax (&other) lenses adapted to Fuji X digital
Fan of DA limited and old manual lenses

AlJones2402

Link Posted 10/03/2021 - 09:53
Great information there Peter. I may pm you as I have some rolls been sitting around awaiting development. 🙄🙈
Thanks

Peter Elgar

Link Posted 10/03/2021 - 11:06
AL -- Yes -- Replied YES ! ands I'm CHEEEEPER than anywhere else as I make up my own ID11 /D76 etc formulae and can give OLD FILMS the extra development they need IF you tell me they have been 'sitting around for a few years' whereas a LAB will give only 'Standard Development'
PS -- PRICE quoted £2-50 is ONLY FOR TRADITIONAL Films NOT C41 types.
been a member of Pentax Club since the Ron Spillman era! Got COMPUTERISED at last - DIGITISED? Taken the PLUNGE - BUT FILM STILL RULES !!!
Last Edited by Peter Elgar on 10/03/2021 - 11:09

bjolester

Link Posted 11/03/2021 - 08:32
Thank you for advice about storage and handling of film Peter!

How long time could one have Ilford HP5 plus in the camera before it has detrimental effect to the film? Nowadays I often use several months to finish a film.
Bjørn

PPG
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MHOL190246

Link Posted 12/03/2021 - 11:13
Way back in the 1960s I worked in the Colour Testing Department at Ilford Films. One of the tests that we undertook with exposed film was the amount of image decay after 28 days, this being the point at which the silver halide would start to deteriorate. On the whole, a period of 1 to 3 months from first exposure to last was normally acceptable, after which image quality would very slowly decline. On this basis, I would suggest that your HP5 should have no more than 9 months to a year before serious regression would occur. I hope this helps

Michael

danofmk

Link Posted 12/03/2021 - 18:02
Good to know Peter, might take you up on that next time...

bjolester

Link Posted 12/03/2021 - 18:34
MHOL190246 wrote:
Way back in the 1960s I worked in the Colour Testing Department at Ilford Films. One of the tests that we undertook with exposed film was the amount of image decay after 28 days, this being the point at which the silver halide would start to deteriorate. On the whole, a period of 1 to 3 months from first exposure to last was normally acceptable, after which image quality would very slowly decline. On this basis, I would suggest that your HP5 should have no more than 9 months to a year before serious regression would occur. I hope this helps

Michael

Thank you Michael! I am glad to receive "inside advice" from Ilford films I have probably never had Ilford HP5 (or any other Ilford films) in my cameras for more than six months at the most. In the future I will try to shoot HP5 more often, thus keeping the film in the camera for only a few months maximum.
Bjørn

PPG
Flickr
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