Windows of Chora


Photo Information
The Chora Church was originally built as part of a monastery complex outside the walls of Constantinople, to the south of the Golden Horn. Literally translated, the church's full name was the Church of the Holy Saviour in the Country: although "The Church of the Holy Redeemer in the Fields" would be a more natural rendering of the name in English. (Greek ἡ Ἐκκλησία του Ἅγιου Σωτῆρος ἐν τῃ Χώρᾳ, hē Ekklēsia tou Hagiou Sōtēros en tēi Chōrai).[2] The last part of that name, Chora, referring to its location originally outside of the walls, became the shortened name of the church. The original church on this site was built in the early 5th century, and stood outside of the 4th century walls of Constantine the Great. However, when Theodosius II built his formidable land walls in 413414, the church became incorporated within the city's defences, but retained the name Chora. The name must have carried symbolic meaning, as the mosaics in the narthex describe Christ as the Land of the Living (ἡ Χώρα των ζώντων, hē Chōra tōn zōntōn) and Mary, the Mother of Jesus, as the Container of the Uncontainable (ἡ Χώρα του Ἀχώρητου, hē Chōra tou Achōrētou).

The majority of the fabric of the current building dates from 10771081, when Maria Dukaina, the mother-in-law of Alexius I Comnenus, rebuilt the Chora Church as an inscribed cross or quincunx: a popular architectural style of the time. Early in the 12th century, the church suffered a partial collapse, perhaps due to an earthquake. The church was rebuilt by Isaac Comnenus, Alexius's third son. However, it was only after the third phase of building, two centuries after, that the church as it stands today was completed. The powerful Byzantine statesman Theodore Metochites endowed the church with much of its fine mosaics and frescos. Theodore's impressive decoration of the interior was carried out between 1315 and 1321. The mosaic-work is the finest example of the Palaeologian Renaissance. The artists remain unknown. In 1328, Theodore was sent into exile by the usurper Andronicus III Palaeologus. However, he was allowed to return to the city two years later, and lived out the last two years of his life as a monk in his Chora Church.(Taken from Wikipedia)
The mosaic shots will be uploaded later.
07/12/2012 - 10:32nonur
CategoryArchitecture
Shutter Speed1/400
Aperturef/7.1
LensN/A
ISO1250
Focal Length137.5mm
Views/Likes45/0

davidtrout

Link Posted 07/12/2012 - 15:40
Lovely detailed shot Nezih. And thanks for the detailed history of this fine building.
David

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GIULIO57

Link Posted 07/12/2012 - 17:23
Sharp and good compo. I like the green on the right that adds a living presence in the compo...like those beyond glasses
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autumnlight

Link Posted 07/12/2012 - 22:54
Very impressive and great detail, enjoyed the history too.
Kind regards Maria

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pauljay

Link Posted 07/12/2012 - 23:21
At first glance it almost looks as though the building is being overgrown on the inside and the outside, until you see that the interior plants are potted! I like that!
Paul.

Photography is not a sport. It has no rules. Everything must be dared and tried! (Bill Brandt)
jaypix
yankee44
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