A Studio Portrait


Photo Information
It's not really a studio portrait, just a photo I took of my wife Nicky and our dog Daisy today, whilst at the Ryedale Folk Museum in Hutton-Le-Hole, North Yorkshire. The museum has a fabulous collection of old buildings, from Medieval timber framed houses, to an old photo studio with the large windows made of old glass photographic plates. I couldn't resist a posed shot in this atmospheric place.

K-5IIs, Sigma 17-70, Polarising filter
24/07/2014 - 00:01davidstorm
CategoryPortraits / People
Shutter Speed1/10
Aperturef/4.5
LensN/A
ISO200
Focal Length21mm

bwlchmawr

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 07:30
I really like this, David. Not sure why. It's neither one thing nor the other but somehow compelling.
Best wishes,

Andrew

"These places mean something and it's the job of a photographer to figure-out what the hell it is."
Robert Adams
"The camera doesn't make a bit of difference. All of them can record what you are seeing. But, you have to SEE."
Ernst Hass
My website: http://www.ephotozine.com/user/bwlchmawr-199050 http://s927.photobucket.com/home/ADC3440/index
https://www.flickr.com/photos/78898196@N05

wombat101010

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 07:55
Like this. The backdrop acts as a natural frame for your wife & Daisy. What benefit do you get from using a polarising filter indoors? It's on my list to buy one, just not got round to it yet.
Regards
Steve

pauljay

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 08:09
Time to re-visit that museum! Lovely shot David and I'm sure you got plenty more in Hutton-Le-Hole!
Paul.

Photography is not a sport. It has no rules. Everything must be dared and tried! (Bill Brandt)
PPG

trixie

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 09:23
This is stunning David, love the studio style, and of course always lovely to see Nicki and Daisy too.
Wonderful portrail shot.

Trixie

Mac

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 11:21
Two real ladies in a perfect setting.
Mac from Montreal

SP, SPII, SPF, PZ-10, P30, SFX, K110D, istDS, Optio 60, Z-10, H90, RZ10, I-10, f3.5 28mm, f1.8 55mm, f1.4 50mm, f3.5 135mm, f2.5 135mm, f4 50mm Macro, f4.5 80-200 F, f4 35-70, f3.5 28-80, f3.5 35-135, f3.5 18-55, f1.8 31mm Ltd., two Auto 110's, Auto 110 lenses and filters, tubes, bellows, Manfrottos and a sore back.

davidstorm

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 11:50
wombat101010 wrote:
Like this. The backdrop acts as a natural frame for your wife & Daisy. What benefit do you get from using a polarising filter indoors? It's on my list to buy one, just not got round to it yet.

Hi Steve, no real benefit, except it has a positive effect on colours, more saturation / intensity. The only reason it was on is because I had been using it outside in bright sunlight.

bwlchmawr wrote:
I really like this, David. Not sure why.

Thanks Andrew, I took a few more yesterday that I'm sure you will like too. If you are ever in North Yorkshire the Ryedale Folk Museum is a 'must visit' place, it is superb.

Thank you Paul, Trixie and Mac, as always I really appreciate your comments.

Best wishes
David
Flickr

Nicola's Apartments, Kassiopi, Corfu

Some cameras, some lenses, some bits 'n' bobs

GIULIO57

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 13:10
Beautiful work and idea bejond this portrait
PPG

autumnlight

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 14:26
Lovely pose from both models, very nice shot.
Kind regards Maria

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Maria-Gray-photography/589310071158079?ref=hl

stub

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 15:14
Nice one david
K-1Gripped K-1 ungripped K-5ii K7 Various lenses

Stuart..

tyronet2000

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 15:19
Agree with the above comments David, and it does sound like somewhere I'll have to visit
Regards
Stan

PPG

senn

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 19:02
what a stupid compo for our post-structuralist era .. but the way it's achieved is just subtle ..
senn
my flickr gallery
my PPG

Teaka53

Link Posted 24/07/2014 - 22:12
bwlchmawr wrote:
I really like this, David. Not sure why. It's neither one thing nor the other but somehow compelling.

I'm the same
Malc

drobbia

Link Posted 30/07/2014 - 05:28
Possibly your lovely wife might have been caught in mid facial pose, as if she's not quite ready for your accuation. The Dog, unperturbed, is ready anytime. - ( my best guess why some of comments above ) -- The image IS very cunningly arranged and executed. The open door image is the strength here. While most image makers would crop at the door you leave the open door as if to invite the viewer past the subjects.( I think we have a Hitchcock mystery evolving here.) Seriously, a intriguing image I'd be proud of. -- tg
"It's not what you look at that's important, it's what you see" - Thoreau
Quote:

davidstorm

Link Posted 01/08/2014 - 15:56
drobbia wrote:
Possibly your lovely wife might have been caught in mid facial pose, as if she's not quite ready for your accuation. The Dog, unperturbed, is ready anytime. - ( my best guess why some of comments above ) -- The image IS very cunningly arranged and executed. The open door image is the strength here. While most image makers would crop at the door you leave the open door as if to invite the viewer past the subjects.( I think we have a Hitchcock mystery evolving here.) Seriously, a intriguing image I'd be proud of. -- tg

Thanks Tony, the 'open door' for me is the focal point of the image and as you say is intended to lead the eye past the main subjects.

Best wishes
David
Flickr

Nicola's Apartments, Kassiopi, Corfu

Some cameras, some lenses, some bits 'n' bobs
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