House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)


Photo Information
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Passeridae
Genus: Passer
Species: P. domesticus
Binomial name: Passer domesticus(Linnaeus, 175


The House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) is a member of the Old World sparrow family Passeridae. It occurs naturally in most of Europe and much of Asia. It has also followed humans all over the world and has been intentionally or accidentally introduced to most of the Americas, sub-Saharan Africa and Australia as well as urban areas in other parts of the world.

In the United States it is also known as the English Sparrow, to distinguish it from native species, as the large North American population is descended from birds deliberately imported from Britain in the late 19th century. They were introduced independently in a number of American cities in the years between 1850 and 1875 as a means of pest control.

Wherever people build, House Sparrows sooner or later come to share their abodes. Though described as tame and semi-domestic, neither is strictly true; humans provide food and home, not companionship. The House Sparrow remains wary of man.

This 14 to 16 centimetre long bird is abundant in temperate climates, but not universally common; in many hilly districts it is scarce. In cities, towns and villages, even around isolated farms, it can be the most abundant bird.

The male House Sparrow has a grey crown, cheeks and underparts, black on the throat, upper breast and between the bill and eyes. The bill in summer is blue-black, and the legs are brown. In winter the plumage is dulled by pale edgings, and the bill is yellowish brown. The female has no black on head or throat, nor a grey crown; her upperparts are streaked with brown. The juveniles are deeper brown, and the white is replaced by buff; the beak is dull yellow. The House Sparrow is often confused with the smaller and slimmer Tree Sparrow, which, however, has a chestnut and not grey crown, two distinct wing bars, and a black patch on each cheek.

The House Sparrow is gregarious at all seasons in its nesting colonies, when feeding and in communal roosts.

Although the Sparrows' young are fed on the larvae of insects, often destructive species, this species eats seeds, including grain where it is available.

In spring, flowers especially those with yellow colours are often eaten; crocuses, primroses and aconites seem to attract the house sparrow most. The bird will also hunt butterflies.

The Sparrow's most common call is a short and incessant chirp. It also has a double call note phillip which originated the now obsolete name of "phillip sparrow". While the young are in their nests, the older birds utter a long churr. At least three broods are reared in the season.
09/12/2009 - 19:17Pentaxfriend
CategoryWildlife / Nature
Shutter Speed1/125
Aperturef/5.6
LensN/A
ISO200
Focal Length400mm
Views/Likes54/0
alun
Posted 09/12/2009 - 19:56 Link
Beautiful. Sadly, they do not seem quite as abundant as they were 10 years ago.
tomkeet
Posted 09/12/2009 - 21:02 Link
Beautiful sharp shot.
Regards
Tom

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johnriley
Posted 09/12/2009 - 21:04 Link
What a fantastic shot! Beautiful!
Best regards, John
paulgee20
Posted 10/12/2009 - 02:19 Link
Brilliant shot.

Paul
Keep on shooting......
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matwhittington
Posted 10/12/2009 - 20:19 Link
I agree with all the above Really great pic

Mat
Mat W

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Posted 11/12/2009 - 19:52 Link
Thanks for the lovely words and Comments
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