Bessemer converter


Photo Information
Only 3 left in the world, it revolutionised steel maing. Patented by Henry Bessemerin 1856 in converted pig iron in steel.The egg shape converter was tilted down to pour molten pig iron in through the top, then swung back to a vertical position and blast of air was blown through the base of the convertor in a dramatic'blow', spectacular but very dangerous as fountains of flames shot out of the top. It was tilted again and newly made steel was teemed ot poured out, it could make 7 tonnes of steel in half an hour.It was used for making railways around the world. Sheffield at that time 1860-1880s was producing 10.000 tons of steel every week. Now we have gardens and modern office blocks, posh hotels.
28/05/2011 - 11:06trixie
CategoryGeneral
BodyK-x
Shutter SpeedN/A
Aperturef/8
LensN/A
ISO400
Focal Length35mm

thoramay

Link Posted 28/05/2011 - 13:23
It reminds me of the mangol worzol that I used to work on converting mangols into fodder for them cows. Huge cog wheels.
Well!! That's the nearest I got to machinery in the 1930/40's

Seriously. Being in the rural sticks somehow does nothing for my education on how it was in heavy industry.

This looks frightening to work with. But it was the norm for workers in those days.

Super shot, Trixie. Detail brilliant. You are certainkly getting there.

autumnlight

Link Posted 28/05/2011 - 13:33
Interesting story behind this Trixie, i feel as though i've been back to school lol, but seriously it is a sad story that so much of our industry has now passed, one of the reasons why i love Lowry's paintings.
Kind regards Maria

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Maria-Gray-photography/589310071158079?ref=hl

trixie

Link Posted 28/05/2011 - 13:45
thoramay wrote:
It reminds me of the mangol worzol that I used to work on converting mangols into fodder for them cows. Huge cog wheels.
Well!! That's the nearest I got to machinery in the 1930/40's

Seriously. Being in the rural sticks somehow does nothing for my education on how it was in heavy industry.

This looks frightening to work with. But it was the norm for workers in those days.

Super shot, Trixie. Detail brilliant. You are certainkly getting there.

autumnlight wrote:
Interesting story behind this Trixie, i feel as though i've been back to school lol, but seriously it is a sad story that so much of our industry has now passed, one of the reasons why i love Lowry's paintings.

trixie

Link Posted 28/05/2011 - 13:47
Thank you both, hope I've not got boring in my old age, I love Lowry's paintings too, and thoramay, I didn't know that about the mangle worzols, you learn all kinds of stuff on here LOL best wishes to you both Trixie

szgabor

Link Posted 29/05/2011 - 06:41
I prefer this version, the angle is more interesting.
Regards,
Gábor
My website
My PPG site

trixie

Link Posted 29/05/2011 - 12:41
szgabor wrote:
I prefer this version, the angle is more interesting.

Thank you my friend, cheers Trixie

nonur

Link Posted 29/05/2011 - 13:44
I like them both, but this is much more impressive with the tight crop, sharpness and light, trixie!
Regards,
Nezih
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