What is Aperture


Phat

Link Posted 13/10/2004 - 14:16
i probably will take a tripod next time> lol keep it up my arse! i might go to the local city library and get some photography books out.

what's a field camera?

i thought about getting a 4mp 6X optical zoom fuji camera but i cant save $398 because i need money to go out.

Anonymous

Link Posted 13/10/2004 - 14:27
Phat,

The correct response from a true photographer should have been,

"I thought about getting a 4mp 6X optical zoom fuji camera but then I saw sense. I'll use the $398 to shoot loads of film when I'm out"

Sigh.

Phat

Link Posted 13/10/2004 - 14:30
im a teenager i need a life > friends > go out, Photography is a hobbie im at school so its not a career.

Kimbo

Link Posted 13/10/2004 - 14:40
.........and never will be unless you devote plenty of time and effort to it!

Seriously, whatever you do, have fun (especially while you're young) - life's just too short otherwise.
Die my dear doctor, that's the last thing I shall do!

Anonymous

Link Posted 14/10/2004 - 11:31
I never suggested that you pay for a digital camera outright. I suggested that you sell your SLR Camera. You should get $250 for it. You can get a decent 3mp camera for that now.

Phat

Link Posted 15/10/2004 - 03:02
no i wont, ive had no difficulty with the photo's iv'e been into the city yesterday and the day before.

Anonymous

Link Posted 15/10/2004 - 10:56
Put it this way - We have already established that you are not hunting for that extra quality that an SLR provides, while you are Clearly struggling with the facets of an SLR Camera. You may not have had any trouble but if you have no need (or current ability) and digital would be the answer. IT is more convienent and far cheaper (for someone like you) in the long-run.

Phat

Link Posted 15/10/2004 - 13:49
im not strugling i just wanted to know some things.

Kimbo

Link Posted 15/10/2004 - 14:05
Phat,
returning to the topic of this thread, have you got to grips with the relationship between aperture and shutter speed yet?

If not, this is how I explain it to beginners, I keep it very simple and don't worry about depth of field at this stage as that can be considered as 'fine tuning', as can the choice of film and shutter speed.

1. The amount of light transmitted to the film is called the 'exposure'
2. There is one correct exposure for the given lighting conditions of the scene.
3. The exposure is achieved by a combination of aperture (size of hole in the lens that the light passes through) and shutter speed (the length of time that the hole is open for)
4. A large hole requires less time to allow the correct amount of light through than a small one, therefore a wide range of aperture/shutter speed combinations can be used to achieve the same exposure.
5. Shutter speeds are measured in fractions of a second, faster shutter speeds are used to prevent blurred images caused by camera movement and to freeze the action of moving subjects.
6. Think of aperture numbers as fractions too - the smallest number (eg. f3.5) means that the hole is wide open, f22 therefore is usually the smallest hole available - the actual figures available depend on the design of the lens.
7. The number of suitable combinations is determined by the sensitivity of the film, ISO 1000 film is faster (more sensitive) than ISO 400 which is faster than ISO 100 etc.
8. Slower film tends to be less grainy and deliver sharper results than fast film but requires the camera to be supported (eg. on a tripod) in dim light conditions or when using a long (telephoto) lens because of the longer exposure times.
9. Basic program cameras (such as the P30) automatically provide suitable exposure settings for hand-held shots under normal (average) lighting conditions with lenses around the 'standard' length of 50mm - a 35-70mm or 28-80mm zoom lens is therefore ideal.

That should be enough to get you started, then when you've understood how and why the camera automatically selects certain settings in program mode, you can begin experimenting with different combinations to achieve various effects - you can change the mood of the image by deliberately under or overexposing it, you can select a slower combination in order to blur the image to enhance the sense of action or a small aperture to ensure that both nearby and distant subjects are in focus.
Use the graininess of fast film to give your photos a newspaper look or to provide a mysterious murkiness, especially with black and white film.

There are far too many facets to photography to go into here but if you can understand the points I've listed above, you'll be well on your way.
Die my dear doctor, that's the last thing I shall do!

Phat

Link Posted 15/10/2004 - 14:47
thanks i knew all about that a couple of days ago but james seems to think im still confused.

Anonymous

Link Posted 05/12/2004 - 03:49
i got the photos developed and they were oright i got them on cd and printed.
i am getting an Olympus D-540 for christmas (3.2mp 3x opt zoom - $229 AUD) which should probably be better than the SLR.

Anonymous

Link Posted 05/12/2004 - 04:27
its a Olmpus CAMEDIA D-540
at has panorama mode two.

Anonymous

Link Posted 05/12/2004 - 04:35
its a Olmpus CAMEDIA D-540
at has panorama mode two.

Anonymous

Link Posted 20/10/2005 - 15:54
Hi Phat,
I have the same camera (P30T) & flash. Good on you for starting out on a complex camera. With a bit of practice you should master the basics - don't be discouraged & keep asking for info or read up on it.

The aperture is like an eye - it is able to let more light in or less light - when it is on f22 the aperture closes up to a tiny hole & not much light gets in to the camera. You may find yourself using the f16, f22 when it's a bright sunny day. At the other end of the scale is the smaller f numbers like f2, f2.8 or f3.5 and the hole is large so it lets more light into the camera, like for dull days or dim rooms. Take the lens off the camera sometime & look through the back of the lens while you rotate the aperture ring (there's a little black button on the camera body near where the lens attaches).

Basically, for night time flash photography...
1) set the shutter dial on the top of the camera to 100 (with the flash/lightning symbol). This means you will be taking photos with a 1/100th shutter speed.
2) Find out what speed the film is (This will determine what to set your aperture ring on the lens). It probably will be ASA100, 200, 400 or 800. If the film is already in the camera you will be able to read the writing on the film canister through the little window on the back of the camera on the left.
3) Set your aperture (f number). If your film speed is 100ASA set the aperture ring on the lens to f4.
If film is 200ASA set aperture to f5.6.
If film is 400ASA set aperture to f8.
4) When the camera is turned on you should see a green flash/lightning symbol through the viewfinder.
5) Focus & SHOOT!
6) Before the next flash shot, wait for the flash to recharge (red light on the flash = ready). You may hear a high-pitched sound.
7) The Achiever 300DX will only flash as far as 2.6m (16 feet).

...and for basic daytime photography...

1) set shutter dial on the top of the camera to A (Automatic). When you get more experience, you can use the manual shutter speed settings (i.e. 1/60th up to 1/1000th of a second.), but until then stick to A (Automatic).
2) Look through viewfinder & rotate aperture ring on the lens until the number in the viewfinder is still & stops flashing. If it's GREEN- FOCUS & SHOOT! If it's orange, the speed is too slow & you will get a blurry shot so maybe put the flash on (& set shutter dial to 1/100th & set aperture to correct setting for your film speed).

Good luck!
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