Venturing into the World of primes


hkwiles

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 15:59
I am taking my first steps into purchasing another lens any advice. in know the question to be answered is " what do you want to photgraph? . The answer is anything and everything that takes my eye. I suppose in all practicality...portraits, landscapes and general walkabout shots. I am quite taken by the DA* 70mm 2.4 ...any comments or suggestions ?

Howard
Body: K7 of course !!
Lenses: DA18-55WR,DA50-200WR,FA50-1.4
Last Edited by hkwiles on 29/08/2010 - 15:59

Don

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 16:03
I went with the 50 1.4 and 100mm macro, have been so happy, I couldn't justify any of the inbetween lengths...
so I'm considering something in the 20-35mm range when I buy my next camera body...
Fired many shots. Didn't kill anything.
Last Edited by Don on 29/08/2010 - 16:03

johnriley

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 16:31
The 70mm f2.4 won't add any new focal lengths to your kit, so why not look at the things you don't have?

You don't have a Macro lens, and the 100mm is probably the most useful of these.

You don't have an ultra-wide, so the 12-24mm may be the one for you.

Specialist lenses could be the 10-17mm Fisheye, or maybe you fancy extending your 50-200mm by replacing it with the 50-300mm.
Best regards, John

Cayman

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 16:39
I agree with John - get a 90/100/105mm macro. It's really 2 lenses in one - macro and portraits. And at f2.8 it will be a faster lens than either of your current ones.

hkwiles

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 16:42
John I was thinking more in terms of photo quality . The photo of the rose which I have just uploaded was taken around 70mm ( I also realised I hadn't changed my iso back from 800 to 200), will not the Prime produce a much better image ?
Body: K7 of course !!
Lenses: DA18-55WR,DA50-200WR,FA50-1.4

Dangermouse

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 16:43
One trick that might help you decide:

Try using one of your existing zooms set to the focal length you're considering buying as a prime. See how useful it is to you and make a decision.

Personally I'd find the 70mm a bit long, I'd find the 21mm DA Ltd much more useful as I tend to use an old manual 28mm prime when I want a small walkabout lens.
Matt

Shooting the Welsh Wilderness with K-m, KX, MX, ME Super and assorted lenses.

johnriley

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 16:52
The quality of the zooms is so good that the primes are not that much different. Primes are, however, generally faster than zooms and this can be useful in some circumstances.

For flower pictures the 50-200mm and 50-300mm are excellent, but then so is the 100mm Macro. I think both these would be more practical than a 70mm f2.4 that you probably won't ever use at f2.4. The 100mm Macro is better, but it's by a modest margin. However, for close focusing it can't be beaten.
Best regards, John

Don

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 16:55
Dangermouse wrote:
One trick that might help you decide:

Try using one of your existing zooms set to the focal length you're considering buying as a prime. See how useful it is to you and make a decision.

Personally I'd find the 70mm a bit long, I'd find the 21mm DA Ltd much more useful as I tend to use an old manual 28mm prime when I want a small walkabout lens.

I'm leaning towards the 21, but holding off til the new cameras are released to see what's coming..

70 is a tad long for general walk about.

of all the gear I own, nothing gets used as much as my fast fifties.....

then the 16-45, then the 100 macro, 10-17, 85mm soft, 28-70 f4

I use mine mostly in studio,or indoors, low light, hence the desire for primes, followed by constant aperture zooms...

John's advice is very sound... buy something that adds to your capabilities first before you buy something that duplicates what you already got.
Fired many shots. Didn't kill anything.

dougf8

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 17:00
The 100ish macro is a good buy, its lovely to get decent close up pics and with some cheap extension tubes lots of fun too. Being f2.8 they also provide a decent telephoto for shorter distances. Handy for rainy days indoors for desktop macro work.

A 50-60mm prime F1.4 good for portraits and some walk around shots. Don't ignore manual focus. F1.4 adds to low light ability. Usually slightly soft wide open but sharpen up quickly.

(I'm hankering after a decent 28mm F2.8 OR a 10-20mm zoom, funds willing.)
Lurking is shirking.!

Don

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 17:04
hkwiles wrote:
John I was thinking more in terms of photo quality . The photo of the rose which I have just uploaded was taken around 70mm ( I also realised I hadn't changed my iso back from 800 to 200), will not the Prime produce a much better image ?

in a word, no.

Skill, composition and lighting make for a better photo, with any lens.
photographer errors like the one you mentioned will bite you with any lens.

now a fast prime may have four noticeable DIFFERENCES over your kit zoom..

1) boke, the out of focus areas may be more pleasing
2) DOF at wide open apertures may be more pleasing..
3) ability to manually focus and auto focus in low light may be better..
4) sharpness increased will be noticeable when printing huge enlargements..

but...

for most shots that are not going to be printed larger than 11x14,
you should be able to get many fine shots with the lens you got......
and stopped down from wide open, a good shot from either lens will be hard to tell one from the other...
Fired many shots. Didn't kill anything.
Last Edited by Don on 29/08/2010 - 17:06

Helpful

hkwiles

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 17:17
Thanks Don for the comments and for bringing back down to Earth !! . I have just recently joined the local camera club and obviously there are some very keen enthusiasts very much into the technical side of things.

I'd forgotten bout my Contax 139 days and Zeiss 50mm 1.7 , when I had to take more time over the basics and produced some pleasing shots.

I haevn't actually used my K7 all that much as its only recently I have retired. I will get some shots fired off with the two kit lens , and see what I can produce I don't anticipate anything larger than the occassional 10 x 8 print.

I must admit , a macro capability would be nice though !
Body: K7 of course !!
Lenses: DA18-55WR,DA50-200WR,FA50-1.4
Last Edited by hkwiles on 29/08/2010 - 17:18

dougf8

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 17:22
I've had a look at your Rose and I think the focus is out, it appear to be quite shallow and on the vase. You should be able to do better with the kit lens, its not a bad lens. Try using the focus selection points / using manual focus.

The rose isn't going anywhere and you can leave the camera on a slow shutter and put the ISO to 100 (or 200 if you use the increased DR) and use f5.6 or higher for more DOF.

The other more contentious point is to say that its slightly overexposed on the rose and the K-7 has an issue dealing with overexposed reds in camera Jpeg processing.
Lurking is shirking.!
Last Edited by dougf8 on 29/08/2010 - 17:24

Don

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 17:26
well primes are worth it for me, it's my job to pull nice shots out of situations where the other guy comes up with a dud.

but the 100mm macro would be be a nice addition to your kit...
don't let me talk you out of the lens buying affliction....
Fired many shots. Didn't kill anything.

hkwiles

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 17:42
Thanks for comments Doug , I was aware of most of them, leaves are well in focus but flower head isn't. The JPEG has been tweaked a little in photshop Canera Raw.

I really must get down to some serious shooting I know that !!
Body: K7 of course !!
Lenses: DA18-55WR,DA50-200WR,FA50-1.4

helios

Link Posted 29/08/2010 - 17:59
hkwiles indicated that he was interested in venturing into the world of primes.
The above posts contain very good advice.

If primes are of interest I would suggest considering the DA 15mm Ltd which would extend his range at the wide end and is sharper and with lower distotion than the kit lens. It is also remarkably free from flare making shots into the light possible. Being a limited it is a pleasure to use being small, well built with its integral collapsible hood and matches the small body of the K-7 remarkably well. It is an excellent lens for landscape and outdoor architectural photography.

The main drawbacks are that it is rather expensive and not very fast at f4.

Archie
Archie
Add a Comment
You must be registered or logged-in to comment.