Tair-3 300mm f4.5 GRAND PRIX Brussels 1958


LennyBloke

Link Posted 16/09/2021 - 13:56
I owned one of these strange lenses many years ago and never really got on with it, but with more experience and a different expectation I now know to use lenses for their character rather than just looking for ultimate sharpness.

The copy I picked up yesterday was under £50 so I thought I'd give it a go and Well, what an interesting lens!

I suspect my copy (and many others) has been disassembled maybe for cleaning and/or lubrication - this one has a smooth focus whereas many copies are quite stiff from what I read. It's flare resistance is absolutely dire (maybe a strip down and clean of the optics would help) but the handling and construction is quite impressive. As for sharpness - well it's far better than I expected from such an old lens, I'm sure my other 300's could be proved to be sharper but on the first test shots I'm pleasantly surprised.

See what you think...

















LennyBloke

womble

Link Posted 16/09/2021 - 14:13
It has some lovely character. Used on the right subjects (as you have here) it can clearly give some nice results. You aren't going to want to photograph sports or airshows with it, but its certainly worth £50.

K.
Kris Lockyear
It is an illusion that photos are made with the camera… they are made with the eye, heart and head. Henri Cartier-Bresson
Lots of film bodies, a couple of digital ones, too many lenses (mainly older glass) and a Horseman LE 5x4.

My website

Lubbyman

Link Posted 16/09/2021 - 14:50
LennyBloke wrote:
The copy I picked up yesterday...

I thought you were a reformed character. Clearly not!

An interesting lens, though, that I imagine invites you to think before pressing the shutter button. The shafts of light in the first 4 pictures are spot on for the subject matter.

Steve

LennyBloke

Link Posted 16/09/2021 - 15:16
Lubbyman wrote:
...
I thought you were a reformed character. Clearly not!

Steve

Mostly reformed - I'm restricting myself to older, interesting lenses (that I shouldn't lose too much money on when I part with them) or the odd "classic" that I really shouldn't buy but don't want them to be unappreciated.

On the positive side, I have parted with over half my collection in the past few months - so I'm allowing myself a little transgression every now and then
LennyBloke
Last Edited by LennyBloke on 16/09/2021 - 15:16

LennyBloke

Link Posted 16/09/2021 - 15:17
womble wrote:
It has some lovely character. Used on the right subjects (as you have here) it can clearly give some nice results. You aren't going to want to photograph sports or airshows with it, but its certainly worth £50.

K.

If I used it at an airshow I think I might be arrested for imitating a bazooka
LennyBloke

Aitch53

Link Posted 16/09/2021 - 15:42
That's probably the lens a friend of mine was using on his Kiev-88 in Central London when a couple of the boys in blue checked him, and it, out. The pistol-grip probably didn't help make it look too innocent either...
SteveH!

Some people call me 'strange'.
I prefer 'unconventional'.
But I'm willing to compromise and accept 'eccentric'.

Defragged

Link Posted 16/09/2021 - 23:41
LennyBloke wrote:


See what you think...


Cracking examples indeed from a very capable vintage lens shot by a very capable not so vintage photographer. I own a mint copy of its little brother the Tair 11a which I can't praise enough.

Vintage lenses aren't about sharpness alone, they're about character and history and satisfaction of ownership and most of all the shear joy of using them.
C.O.L.B.A.S victim
(Compulsive Obsessive Lens Buying Addiction Syndrome)

What you need are lenses, more lenses, bigger lenses, better lenses, faster lenses, and when you have these, your pictures will be perfect!

geordie01

Link Posted 17/09/2021 - 10:36
I have one of these it weighs a ton
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