Prints haven't got the same 'pop' as on screen images


BigJR

Link Posted 19/08/2012 - 20:13
Hi guys.

Recently I've acquired a Canon iP4850 printer and started to print my images.

I've been a little underwhelmed with my first few attempts.

Images which appear sharp and bright in Lightroom come out soft and fairly muted in print.

I'm not really sure whether the issue is my monitor, my printer or how I'm exporting the images out of Lightroom for printing. Can anyone offer me some advice on what I should be looking for?

puma

Link Posted 19/08/2012 - 20:24
Have you tried to calibrate your printer with light room?
or set the printer properties set right for the paper and right Photo quality to photo paper? you are using??
my web site http://www.swilsonphotography.foliopic.com/
PPG link

BigJR

Link Posted 19/08/2012 - 20:29
puma wrote:
Have you tried to calibrate your printer with light room?
or set the printer properties set right for the paper and right Photo quality to photo paper? you are using??

I haven't calibrated my printer with Lightroom, how do I do that?

In the Canon printing software it gives an option for paper type, which I always set to the correct type. I can't see any options for photo quality in respect of the paper I'm using.

puma

Link Posted 19/08/2012 - 20:36
You can set your printer with light room when you chose your printer in there see link
or here link
my web site http://www.swilsonphotography.foliopic.com/
PPG link
Last Edited by puma on 19/08/2012 - 20:37

Helpful

bforbes

Link Posted 19/08/2012 - 21:33
Don't you also have to consider that the monitor image is back lit, which will naturally give it more "pop".
Barrie
Too Old To Die Young

http://www.pentaxphotogallery.com/artists/barrieforbes
https://www.flickr.com/photos/189482630@N03/

szgabor

Link Posted 19/08/2012 - 22:44
Did you use Canon's printing software the Easy-PhotoPrint EX?
If yes then did you select the option 'Vivid Colors' at the paper selection?
Without these you can not print out photos in acceptable quality with the iP series printers.
Regards,
Gábor
My website
My PPG site

Helpful

BigJR

Link Posted 20/08/2012 - 07:49
bforbes wrote:
Don't you also have to consider that the monitor image is back lit, which will naturally give it more "pop".

That's a fair point Barrie, but the difference I'm seeing is huge.

BigJR

Link Posted 20/08/2012 - 07:50
szgabor wrote:
Did you use Canon's printing software the Easy-PhotoPrint EX?
If yes then did you select the option 'Vivid Colors' at the paper selection?
Without these you can not print out photos in acceptable quality with the iP series printers.

I had never even seen this option until you mentioned it Gabor, I have tried it and it has made a huge difference. Thank you.

szgabor

Link Posted 20/08/2012 - 08:08
You're welcome. I'm glad that I could help you.
Regards,
Gábor
My website
My PPG site

pentflash

Link Posted 30/08/2012 - 09:04
I would highly recommend you Spyder calibration tools. They had hardware for calibrating printers as well (i don't know if they are still manufacturing these gadgets).

Softwares are based on average estimates but spyder tools read more than that.


Life is full of frames but only few of them will be captured.

wvbarnes

Link Posted 30/08/2012 - 10:20
I recall from the film era Kodak pointing out to us resellers that a slide had potential for ten times the colour range of a print.

I think the 'pop' from 'Vivid' in my Canon driver (its not just in Easyphoto)aweful as I do of so many over saturated landscapes I see dotted around the web and sadly of late on prints in galleries that clearly have overcooked HDR treatment and sauturated printing. Seems commercially popular though!

Calibrating kit AND trusting your eye are sound advice.

Algernon

Link Posted 30/08/2012 - 10:58
True colours are actually very dull and boring

Kodak used to make a Professional Colour Film called
Vericolor that had very true colours, most amateurs that
used it were unhappy with the colours and went back to
Kodacolor that had enhanced reds and greens

So all this talk about calibrating this that and the other
is only going to lead to dull and boring prints.
Half Man... Half Pentax ... Half Cucumber

Pentax K-1 + K-5 and some other stuff

Algi

johnriley

Link Posted 30/08/2012 - 11:56
Vericolor was a professional film of low contrast for wedding photographers. It helped in recording black suits alongside white dresses.

Kodacolor was the everyday film that gave sparkle and snap to holiday pictures.

Now we have digital cameras we can dial in whatever style we like.
Best regards, John

Algernon

Link Posted 30/08/2012 - 13:14
Vericolor wasn't just for wedding photographers... being Kodaks only C-41 Pro film (Extacolor old C-22 process was discontinued in 1975) it was for all Pro work including portraiture and commercial work where the shutter speed was 1/10 sec. or shorter. I'm quite sure it was available in all formats inc. sheet films. The film number was VPS120 etc.

There was also a tungsten version (VPL)rated at 80ASA which could be used in daylight at 50ASA with an 85B filter. This could be used at speeds between 1/50th and 60 secs. This was never released, as far as I can remember in 35mm just VPL120 and sheet.

Being a Pro film it was supposed to be refrigerated before and after use and not left in the camera.
Half Man... Half Pentax ... Half Cucumber

Pentax K-1 + K-5 and some other stuff

Algi

simonkit

Link Posted 30/08/2012 - 15:11
The best way I've found for "similiar" print to monitor colours are:

Calibrated monitor

If using photoshop "let photoshop manage colours", output using Srgb color profile

On your printer...correct ICC profile and turn off its own colour management

Simon
My website http://www.landscapephotographyuk.com

My Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/landscapephotographyuk

Find me on Google+ link
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