Picking the brains of expired film users


SteveF

Link Posted 20/08/2020 - 17:33
I have in my fridge a roll of film which I bought in a charity shop, simply because I had never come across it before.

It's Scotch (the magnetic tape people) Chrome E6 colour slide film and the speed rating is ISO 1000 (no that's not a typo!). The expiry date is 10/1993. The box which is slightly battered but unopened is marked Made in Italy and has text in English, French, German, Italian and Spanish.

Any thoughts on what ISO rating might produce usable images in 2020?

Benz3ne

Link Posted 20/08/2020 - 21:33
You usually half the ISO for every decade past itís expiry date, from my understanding. Iím sure the infinitely knowledgeable Mr Peter Elgar will be able to impart some knowledge on the matter.

danofmk

Link Posted 20/08/2020 - 21:47
That's always been the rule of thumb I work by, although I've not had lots of goes at it.

If it was ISO 800 I'd be saying 100 should be about right. Go with that probably. A little bit over is usually better than a little bit under

Would love to know how you get on!

danofmk

Link Posted 20/08/2020 - 21:52
A bit of digging, and it seems the film was made by Ferrania, the Italian company famous for the P30 movie film.

Apparently they were purchased by the US 3M company in 1964, and made various still films under the Scotch brand.

jeallen01

Link Posted 20/08/2020 - 22:05
danofmk wrote:
A bit of digging, and it seems the film was made by Ferrania, the Italian company famous for the P30 movie film.

Apparently they were purchased by the US 3M company in 1964, and made various still films under the Scotch brand.

I would also guessed that Ferrania was the actual manufacturer.
K-3 II, K-3 and a K-70 from SRS (having now relegated the K-30 /"K-50" to a backup body), & some Sigma and Pentax lenses (and a lot of old 35mm gear!)

johnriley

Link Posted 20/08/2020 - 22:23
I might be inclined to leave the ISO at 1000, maybe 800, but over-exposure is the ultimate sin with slide films, so a slightly darker end result wouldn't be the end of the world.

Very fast slide films could be quite grainy, but it's worth a go just for interest.
Best regards, John

Jonathan-Mac

Link Posted 21/08/2020 - 11:06
As already stated by others, your best bet would be to rate it around 160 to 200 if you're going to use it.

However, given it's age, that you don't know how it's been stored and that even if it's viable at all it will likely have horrible colour shifts, if it were me I wouldn't bother.
Pentax hybrid user - Digital K3 & K200D, film 645 and 35mm SLR and Pentax (&other) lenses adapted to Fuji X digital
Fan of DA limited and old manual lenses

danofmk

Link Posted 21/08/2020 - 16:24
Jonathan-Mac wrote:
As already stated by others, your best bet would be to rate it around 160 to 200 if you're going to use it.

However, given it's age, that you don't know how it's been stored and that even if it's viable at all it will likely have horrible colour shifts, if it were me I wouldn't bother.

That's part of the fun I think! For the sake of £15 quid getting them developed, well worth it!

johnha

Link Posted 23/08/2020 - 11:31
Jonathan-Mac wrote:
However, given it's age, that you don't know how it's been stored and that even if it's viable at all it will likely have horrible colour shifts, if it were me I wouldn't bother.

I'd agree, the price of processing has made experiments like this too expensive (especially colour slide).

I'm sure someone with lots of darkroom experience might suggest a clip test (process only a couple of frames and adapt your development from there) but I'm not sure that would work with a home dev E6 kit?
PPG Flickr

RobL

Link Posted 23/08/2020 - 11:36
Expired film users? Have you tried a Medium?
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