Pentax K20D


melness

Link Posted 10/04/2016 - 11:47
Simple question really .... can the K20d still compete with the newer DSLRs in it's class

Sean
Thanks
Sean

wvbarnes

Link Posted 10/04/2016 - 12:59
No, but you can still take great photos with any model of most any modern camera if you get to know it. I certainly found K7 onwards much easier designs to use. I've owned Kx, KR, K5 and now K3. i doubt my photography has improved with different camera bodies gadgets and gimmicks but the right lenses for my use and lots and lots of practice certainly have helped.

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womble

Link Posted 10/04/2016 - 14:31
I used the K20D until about a year ago, and went back to it when my K-3 needed repair a few weeks ago. It was a good camera, and still is, used within its limitations. I found that much above ISO400 on the K20D was pretty ugly, whereas with the K-3 I'll happily use ISO1600, and sometimes 3200. Most of the images of mine on my walls (printed to A3 or A2) were shot with either the K10D or the K20D. Only one image on my wall was shot using my K-3 which was printed at about a foot square, having cropped away about 2/3rds of the image!

As far as I am concerned, the two biggest advantages of the K-3 are size (I can crop quite heavily and still have images capable of being printed large) and IQ with higher ISOs (which means I can use some of my old glass in quite dim conditions). Other people take other sorts of photos, so would have other priorities. I'm thinking of getting the K20D converted for IR use.

K.
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ilovesaabs

Link Posted 10/04/2016 - 16:30
Until the arrival of the K-3 Mk2 then yes, but now it lacks a lot of features that are standard at the price point....but if you don't want those features then the one aspect where it and the K-7 have been left behind is in noise and Dynamic range - the K-5 was such a huge step forward.

I owned one and loved it...
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stu62

Link Posted 10/04/2016 - 19:45
i had the k20 not for long as i use to have the k10 even though the k20 was basicly the k10 with an upgraded sencer i preferd the k10
but it was still better than the k5

fatspider

Link Posted 11/04/2016 - 22:36
Totally have to disagree with stu on the K5, it's leaps and bounds better than the K20D
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richandfleur

Link Posted 12/04/2016 - 05:27
melness wrote:
Simple question really .... can the K20d still compete with the newer DSLRs in it's class

Sean

Define in its class? Do you mean other 6 year old cameras?

richandfleur

Link Posted 12/04/2016 - 05:30
womble wrote:
the K-3 I'll happily use ISO1600, and sometimes 3200.

K.

That's the limit I have on my K-30 and K-S1 also.

This sort of sensor tech is up on the K-7 but hasn't jumped again since that jump.

johnriley

Link Posted 12/04/2016 - 08:03
It's only this past week that we've stopped using our K20D, which is a great design. It is slower than the current cameras, but still very usable.

Now Sue has her K-3 the new backup is her K-5. As soon as practicable the K-1 will arrive and the other K-5 will be passed along to someone else.

They are all fine cameras, but things do move on and eventually an upgrade seems inevitable.
Best regards, John

thisisnotaspoon

Link Posted 15/04/2016 - 14:02
Quote:
i had the k20 not for long as i use to have the k10 even though the k20 was basicly the k10 with an upgraded sencer i preferd the k10
but it was still better than the k5

Oi I've a K-5

I've largely come to the conclusion (after spending a fortune on several hobbies before I got a mortgage) that nothing's perfect and unless it's broken, things don't deteriorate. My k-5 is was good 5 years ago, and will still be just as good even if a K3 is better. It's never going to be the limiting factor compared to the glass in front of it and the squishy bit pressing the shutter.

On a related note, my niece is about to start collage (photography) and doesn't have a DSLR (and unlikely to be able to buy / be bought one) , I was thinking of getting a K20 as a spare body and she could take it on permanent loan in September, and borrow lenses? Or should I just get her an equally cheap Cannon/Nikon which the collage is more likely to have lenses for (no idea whether they do loans or not)? Ebay prices are almost cheap enough that I'd make money back selling the bundled lenses and be in profit if there's a filter!
Last Edited by thisisnotaspoon on 15/04/2016 - 14:03

dragra

Link Posted 16/04/2016 - 08:00
K20D is a great camera. How usable it is in 2016 it depends pretty much on your needs and your particular style of photography. Current entry level cameras have better high ISO performance and faster & more accurate AF. But this is an issue only if you are into available light and/or action photography. For all other stuff K20D still is very capable.

I still use it in my studio setups, it's fast enough as my strobes don't recycle that fast. Image quality is very good at ISO100-400. I don't go beyond that since noise starts to be prominent. The ergonomics are superb, especially with the vertical grip.

McGregNi

Link Posted 16/04/2016 - 10:29
I could have said exactly the same about the K7, although I'd happily stretch the ISO to 800. Both the older ' 'Flagship' models, whilst being, slower and simpler with autofocus and having poorer high ISO performance, do have generally better handling and controls than later entry level ones, plus more options and accessory choices.

One photographer might benefit more from these things and make good use of them, and that may well make up for the slower performance. Another photographer may prefer the faster performance and automation from later, simpler models. Depending on how you use the machine can very well balance out these factors.

Processing can also have an impact. Good RAW processing can make up for resolution and DR deficiencies, within limits obviously.

We're all different. I haven't upgraded from my K7 yet, (had it for over 4 years now), because the newer entry/mid range models don't offer the features I value that the K7 has. I do like to buy new, so for me the next big jump up would be the K3, but I can't really justify that sort of expense when I still enjoy the K7 so much and it works perfectly.
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jemx99

Link Posted 16/04/2016 - 22:48
wvbarnes wrote:
"No, but you can still take great photos with any model of most any modern camera if you get to know it." "the right lenses for my use and lots and lots of practice certainly have helped"

I agree with Bill.

McGregNi wrote:
I'd happily stretch the ISO to 800. Both the older ' 'Flagship' models, whilst being, slower and simpler with autofocus and having poorer high ISO performance, do have generally better handling and controls than later entry level ones, plus more options and accessory choices.

One photographer might benefit more from these things and make good use of them, and that may well make up for the slower performance. Another photographer may prefer the faster performance and automation from later, simpler models. Depending on how you use the machine can very well balance out these factors.

We have a K30 and K5mk11 and we are quite happy to use up to ISO 3200 on both of them - these cameras are both now starting to get a bit long in the tooth but that 16mp sensor is excellent.
I don't use either of the cameras differently in use too - even entry level Pentax cameras have a great range of controls.

Stanovich

Link Posted 27/04/2016 - 22:02
I had a K20D for several years before replacing it (after nearly a year side-by-side) with a K5IIs. Some of my K20D photos, including 12x18" prints, are as good as any I have taken with the K5. Its disadvantages for me - taking mainly landscape and buildings - were principally autofocus and low-light capability, with conspicuous loss of resolution above ISO400. I didn't trust the autofocus, and replaced the standard focussing screen with a KatzEye split prism one. On the K5 I rarely use manual focus and have kept the original screen. But within those limitations the K20D is very capable, if slightly clunky to use compared with the K5 or even my old ME Super.

(I'm not tempted to replace the K5 with anything BTW).
K5IIs & ME Super with FA24-90, DA17-70, DA55-300, misc old primes; Fuji X20.
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