Pentax 70-200 f2.8 ED DC AW D FA* and Pentax 200 DA* f2.8 ED (IF) SDM lense.


Gedski

Link Posted 04/08/2016 - 16:35
I'm trying to get myself one of the above Pentax lenses, money permitting of course. Am I correct in assuming that I will not have either of these lenses hunting as the Tamron 70-300mm Pentax fit lens does? I'm assuming that they will operate in the same manner as the Canon 70-200 f4 'L' lens does.

Daronl

Link Posted 04/08/2016 - 18:10
I have both and they are as good as it gets but "hunting" is dependent on numerous variables some of which such as:
# contrast of the subject against the background,
# the ability of the user to keep a fast moving bird on point,,
# the changing contrast and brightness of the image generally when panning on a bird,
# the relative size of the subject in the view finder,
# the continuously changing distance between you and the bird; there are so many things going on
TO NAME BUT A FEW

If you are not trying to take photos of fast moving smallish subjects then Pentax lenses are pretty good but if you are a BIF photographer then your skill and preparation is more important

Frankly I do not try to "follow focus" or track a fast flying bird bird in AF mode in the hope that the auto-focus system will keep up - AF is switched off; I ensure I have pre-focussed and switched off anything that is in continual processing mode or can cause the shutter operation to lag as I am following that bird.

For example Exposure is set manually, anti-shake is off, the camera is in totally manual mode and I simply position myself so that I can pick up the blurred image in the viewfinder and as it becomes sharp at the pre-focussed point I release the shutter.

I have had the top end birding kit in both Canon and Nikon too and frankly it is just the same issue more or less .

Camera / Lens combinations will hunt to varying degrees; less of course if you are taking a large subject, moving not to quickly with good contrast.

A heron in ponderous flight can be captured in auto mode on just about any camera/lens set up but a returning Puffin at 10 meters, or a stooping hawk is a different ball game.

Sorry to sound like a "Jobe's comforter" but that is my experience over many years, I have not cracked this issue and I would be genuinely most grateful if some one could educate me on this subject because my keeper rate on fast flying birds is still no better tan 20%.

Hunting is what it is - a lens and camera trying to lock on to a subject (not necessarily a moving subject in some cases) but clearly hunting is far more likely in challenging situations like BIF or a black cat running in a dark environment.
Daronl

Chrism8

Link Posted 04/08/2016 - 19:41
Hi Gedski,

Before spending a wedge on a Pentax 70 - 200 F2.8, have a look at a Sigma lens of the same spec you mentioned in a previous thread you couldn't afford the same kit I was using yet the Pentax is well over 1k more expensive than the Sigma lens proven to get decent BIF images on the earlier thread.

It might hunt a little, but that's the nature with what your shooting and good technique can elimate a lot of the hunting.
Chris

www.chrismillsphotography.co.uk

" A Hangover is something that occupies the Head you neglected to use the night before".

-------------------------------------------------------------
K1 - Sigma 85mm F1.4, Pentax 150 -450 F4.5 / 5.6, Pentax FA 24 - 70 F2.8

Sigma 100-300 F4, Samyang 14mm F2.8, Pentax 70-200 F2.8

K3iii + K3ii + K5iis converted to IR, Sigma 17 - 70 F2.8, Pentax 55 - 300 F4.5 / F5.6 PLM
Last Edited by Chrism8 on 04/08/2016 - 19:43

andy_bell

Link Posted 05/08/2016 - 10:52
Chris,
The only Sigma 70-200 f2.8 you can get now would be 2nd hand as Sigma discontinued it in its Pentax mount a couple of years ago....leaving Tamron as the only cheaper alternative in that range.

Andy
A few bits & Bobs

Gedski

Link Posted 05/08/2016 - 14:10
Daronl wrote:
I have both and they are as good as it gets but "hunting" is dependent on numerous variables some of which such as:
# contrast of the subject against the background,
# the ability of the user to keep a fast moving bird on point,,
# the changing contrast and brightness of the image generally when panning on a bird,
# the relative size of the subject in the view finder,
# the continuously changing distance between you and the bird; there are so many things going on
TO NAME BUT A FEW

If you are not trying to take photos of fast moving smallish subjects then Pentax lenses are pretty good but if you are a BIF photographer then your skill and preparation is more important

Frankly I do not try to "follow focus" or track a fast flying bird bird in AF mode in the hope that the auto-focus system will keep up - AF is switched off; I ensure I have pre-focussed and switched off anything that is in continual processing mode or can cause the shutter operation to lag as I am following that bird.

For example Exposure is set manually, anti-shake is off, the camera is in totally manual mode and I simply position myself so that I can pick up the blurred image in the viewfinder and as it becomes sharp at the pre-focussed point I release the shutter.

I have had the top end birding kit in both Canon and Nikon too and frankly it is just the same issue more or less .

Camera / Lens combinations will hunt to varying degrees; less of course if you are taking a large subject, moving not to quickly with good contrast.

A heron in ponderous flight can be captured in auto mode on just about any camera/lens set up but a returning Puffin at 10 meters, or a stooping hawk is a different ball game.

Sorry to sound like a "Jobe's comforter" but that is my experience over many years, I have not cracked this issue and I would be genuinely most grateful if some one could educate me on this subject because my keeper rate on fast flying birds is still no better tan 20%.

Hunting is what it is - a lens and camera trying to lock on to a subject (not necessarily a moving subject in some cases) but clearly hunting is far more likely in challenging situations like BIF or a black cat running in a dark environment.

Daronl, thanks very much for the information, It has been inwardly digested.

Gedski

Link Posted 05/08/2016 - 14:12
Chrism8 wrote:
Hi Gedski,

Before spending a wedge on a Pentax 70 - 200 F2.8, have a look at a Sigma lens of the same spec you mentioned in a previous thread you couldn't afford the same kit I was using yet the Pentax is well over 1k more expensive than the Sigma lens proven to get decent BIF images on the earlier thread.

It might hunt a little, but that's the nature with what your shooting and good technique can elimate a lot of the hunting.

Chrism8, I was thinking more along the lines of a second hand lens but not immediately, you understand. I shall look for the Sigma equivalent as soon as I finish this. Muchly thankings.

Jan.

Chrism8

Link Posted 05/08/2016 - 14:41
Hi Gedski, I would think there ought to be a good chance of picking up a used Sigma 70 - 200 F2.8 somewhere and saving yourself a wedge of cash.
Chris

www.chrismillsphotography.co.uk

" A Hangover is something that occupies the Head you neglected to use the night before".

-------------------------------------------------------------
K1 - Sigma 85mm F1.4, Pentax 150 -450 F4.5 / 5.6, Pentax FA 24 - 70 F2.8

Sigma 100-300 F4, Samyang 14mm F2.8, Pentax 70-200 F2.8

K3iii + K3ii + K5iis converted to IR, Sigma 17 - 70 F2.8, Pentax 55 - 300 F4.5 / F5.6 PLM
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