Newbie getting the hang of DoF (2 images)


ElRazur

Link Posted 13/08/2010 - 18:10
Hi there, I recently purchased a Kx with twin lens and here are my first "official" shots lol. C&C welcome.




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Last Edited by ElRazur on 13/08/2010 - 18:15

ElRazur

Link Posted 13/08/2010 - 18:14
All shots taken with 50-200mm lens

ChrisA

Link Posted 13/08/2010 - 18:36
Ok, well firstly you're one up on a lot of newbies - you've successfully uploaded some pictures

It appears that you were intending to get the foreground in focus, and the background out of focus.

If this is so, then you've pretty much achieved it (although the fencing isn't really sharp), apparently focusing on the closer parts of the subject, and using a relatively wide aperture to ensure that the distance range over which objects appear in focus, is short. Hence you've got an out-of-focus background.

But that's just my inference from how the photos appear, and from the EXIF data embedded in the images themselves.

So, over to you. What, in detail, were you trying to achieve, how did you go about it, and to what extent do you feel your objectives were met?
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Pentax K-3, DA18-135, DA35 F2.4, DA17-70, DA55-300, FA28-200, A50 F1.7, A100 F4 Macro, A400 F5.6, Sigma 10-20 EXDC, 50-500 F4.5-6.3 APO DG OS Samsung flash SEF-54PZF(x2)
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piotro

Link Posted 13/08/2010 - 18:39
1st - nice use of DOF, but main object - grating is not sharp, picture is not in level as well.
2nd - leaf is too dark.


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http://piotr.zenfolio.com
Last Edited by piotro on 13/08/2010 - 18:39

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ElRazur

Link Posted 13/08/2010 - 18:46
ChrisA wrote:
Ok, well firstly you're one up on a lot of newbies - you've successfully uploaded some pictures

It appears that you were intending to get the foreground in focus, and the background out of focus.

If this is so, then you've pretty much achieved it (although the fencing isn't really sharp), apparently focusing on the closer parts of the subject, and using a relatively wide aperture to ensure that the distance range over which objects appear in focus, is short. Hence you've got an out-of-focus background.

But that's just my inference from how the photos appear, and from the EXIF data embedded in the images themselves.

So, over to you. What, in detail, were you trying to achieve, how did you go about it, and to what extent do you feel your objectives were met?


Yes, I was trying to do that. Thanks.

The camera was hand held, and the weather was cloudy, perhaps this could explain why it aint sharp? Or may be I just haven't mastered the art of getting the photo sharp

With the basketball fore-court, I was hoping to having people playing in the back ground, preferably, someone making a slam dunk while I take the shot. After waiting for a while and no one turning up, I opted to take it with just the Basketball net in the background.

What will you advise in order to get sharp photos next time please?




piotro wrote:
1st - nice use of DOF, but main object - grating is not sharp, picture is not in level as well.
2nd - leaf is too dark.


Thanks. All noted.

ChrisA

Link Posted 13/08/2010 - 18:59
ElRazur wrote:
What will you advise in order to get sharp photos next time please?

I'd suggest the following:

- Change the settings so that you're no longer using hard contrast and hard sharpness. Use medium settings instead.
- Forget about depth of field for now
- Set the camera to use the centre auto-focus point
- Pick a subject in the middle of the frame, and take several shots of it. Ensure that for each one...

... it is far enough away (the camera can't focus at all, closer than a certain minimum distance).

... you have focus confirmation (steady green hexagon in viewfinder). If the hexagon is flashing, the camera has not been able to focus.

... the Shake Reduction is on, and has stabilised ('hand' icon in viewfinder).

Then, look at it on the computer, and learn to judge what is sharp, and what is not. Post a couple of examples of what you think is sharp... and tell us what you were trying to achieve for each one.

Once you can reliably get the main subject in focus, it'll be worth moving on to controlling the out-of-focus areas of the picture.
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Pentax K-3, DA18-135, DA35 F2.4, DA17-70, DA55-300, FA28-200, A50 F1.7, A100 F4 Macro, A400 F5.6, Sigma 10-20 EXDC, 50-500 F4.5-6.3 APO DG OS Samsung flash SEF-54PZF(x2)
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Last Edited by ChrisA on 13/08/2010 - 19:01

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ElRazur

Link Posted 13/08/2010 - 19:10
Thanks man.

The Shake reduction was on, but I didn't pay attention to the Hexagon icon.

I have noted all you said, will give it a go when next am out. I suppose I should be doing these in the Av mode right?

ElRazur

Link Posted 13/08/2010 - 19:20
By the way do I still have to keep an eye on the Hexagon icon, even though I am using MF?

terje-l

Link Posted 13/08/2010 - 19:35
You don't need the hexagon signal for manual focus, but it is working in Manual as well, indicating when the camera thinks you are in focus.

Helpful when you eyesight is not up to par. May also be easier to use than the matte screen.
Best regards
Terry

K20D, Optio I10, DA 18-55 1:3.5-5.6 AL II, A 1:1.7/50, D FA 1:2.8/100 Macro, Sigma 70-300 1:4-5.6 APO DG Macro, Pentax AF 360FGZ
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