My today's fighting against polarising filter


szgabor

Link Posted 12/10/2012 - 11:01
I bought a Hoya PRO1 Digital Circular Polarising filter to my smc DA* 16-50/2.8 ED AL [IF] SDM lens. This filter has low-profile frame that is good to avoid the vignetting at the wide-angle end of the lens.
I used it many times without any problems. But last time I forgot to remove it from the lens when I finished the taking pictures. Today morning I couldn't remove it, the filter didn't want to move. I tried for a half an hour using force with no success. Thanks to the low-profile frame I wasn't able to grasp well the filter.
In my last desperation I tried to use a hair dryer. I blew with hot air the verge of the lens for a few minutes and it has released the filter.
The edification is that you should have a hair dryer at hand when you use a Polarasing filter with low-profile frame.
Regards,
Gábor
My website
My PPG site

MattMatic

Link Posted 12/10/2012 - 11:07
I've also put on washing up gloves (aka Marigolds) to get some extra grip
But the hair-drier tip is useful... as long as it's not too hot!
Matt
http://www.mattmatic.co.uk
(For gallery, tips and links)

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szgabor

Link Posted 12/10/2012 - 11:16
The gloves is also a great idea and that has an advance, you can use that on the spot.

OOps! I just noticed that the title has mistypes. The title correctly:
My today's fighting against polarising filter
Regards,
Gábor
My website
My PPG site

johnriley

Link Posted 12/10/2012 - 12:08
Sorted....

szgabor

Link Posted 12/10/2012 - 12:30
Thank you John for your help.
Regards,
Gábor
My website
My PPG site

Stuey

Link Posted 12/10/2012 - 12:40
Another tip I use for many 'stuck items' is a flat boot lace and some long nose pliers - wrap the bootlace carefully around the offending item then grip the ends of the boot lace and begin to roll it up - the excess lace creates a bit of a cushion for the pliers then once it begins to get tight the bootlace grips the 'offending item' and releases it effectively as long as you are careful

Same principle as filter wrench used to remove oil filters

Just makes sure you are not tightening as this is most likelt to damage the item or make it very tight
K10D, K5 plus plenty of clueless enthusiasm.

My Flickr site link

szgabor

Link Posted 12/10/2012 - 16:35
Nice idea Stuey but the problem with your suggestion is that my low-profile frame filter has approximately 1mm fix part where you can grasp that and you can't strain the bootlace to that part.
Regards,
Gábor
My website
My PPG site

Blythman

Link Posted 12/10/2012 - 18:17
johnriley wrote:
Sorted....

You call that sorted ... lol
Alan


PPG
Flickr

davidstorm

Link Posted 12/10/2012 - 20:19
The trick with filters is not to grip them hard when trying to remove them, as gripping them causes the threads to tighten. That's why MattMatic's rubber gloves are the best solution!

I've had many a stuck filter and rubber never fails!

Regards
David
My Website http://imagesbydavidstorm.foliopic.com

Flickr

Some cameras, some lenses, some bits 'n' bobs

Stuey

Link Posted 12/10/2012 - 20:31
szgabor wrote:
Nice idea Stuey but the problem with your suggestion is that my low-profile frame filter has approximately 1mm fix part where you can grasp that and you can't strain the bootlace to that part.

Perhaps it is only useful for larger filters - it works for me

However,

davidstorm wrote:
...and rubber never fails!

Regards
David

David's confidence in rubber seems far more fun to me - woo hoo for marigolds

Incidentally my info above works very well indeed for removing the glass in Bosch ovens to repalce the bulb
K10D, K5 plus plenty of clueless enthusiasm.

My Flickr site link

DoctorJeff

Link Posted 13/10/2012 - 10:06
Another alternative is to press the lens - and hence the filter - down onto a mouse mat. Then grip the lens firmly and try to turn. Of course, if the filter has its own rotating front element - all bets are off.

I have had success removing a cross-threaded filter by running the blade of a very sharp knife round the gap between filter and lens (with some pressure applied) so as to wedge the filter back into its correct position. This might also work as a loosening measure.

Geoff
Water can wear away a stone - but it can't cook lunch
X-5
istDS
K2000
P50.
Lenses Digital: 50-200, 18-55 KAF: 28-80.
Lenses KA & K: SMC-KA f2.0, SMC-K f1.4, SMC-K f1.7 Tokina KA 28-70 , SMC Pentax 70-210 F4, Sigma KA 75-300 , Hanimex 500mm Mirror, and the Tamron Adaptall-2 stuff.
and then there's all the M42 kit, and the accessories ...

droopsnoot

Link Posted 17/10/2012 - 10:56
I bought an 86mm CPL filter for my Sigma 50-500, just one from eBay, not the cheapest but relatively cheap, and that was quite poor in how it screwed on to the lens. When I tried it at the weekend I also found that it affected focus quite badly, whether that was because it's rubbish, or because it wasn't on properly, or some other reason, I don't know.

I also had a panic moment when I couldn't remove it, leading to me remembering what a pain it was to fit. A bit of "trying again" sorted it out, luckily as I wanted to use the lens there and then. But these tips sound quite handy as it also had a freely rotating front and was therefore hard to grip.

Any thoughts on why it affected focus so much?
Real name: Mike Edwards. My homage to seventies Vauxhalls: www.firenza.net

Camera - Pentax Kx, 18-55 kit lens, 18-200 Sigma, 50-500 Sigma, 500mm Tamron mirror

johnriley

Link Posted 17/10/2012 - 11:30
It's a shame we have to use threaded filters - the Rollei bayonet ones are wonderful. Unfortunately so is the price, and translating that style of engineering to a 67mm filter just might end up as expensive as a new lens.

At least the bayonet lens hoods are a boon, so easy to fit and remove that there's little excuse for not doing so.
Best regards, John

Frogherder

Link Posted 17/10/2012 - 12:06
Before you put the filter in place rub across the male thread with a soft (6B) pencil. The graphite lubricates the thread without attracting dust (like oils and waxes).

regards
Bernard

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szgabor

Link Posted 18/10/2012 - 05:53
johnriley wrote:
It's a shame we have to use threaded filters - the Rollei bayonet ones are wonderful. Unfortunately so is the price, and translating that style of engineering to a 67mm filter just might end up as expensive as a new lens.

At least the bayonet lens hoods are a boon, so easy to fit and remove that there's little excuse for not doing so.

You're right John. Our life would be easier but I'm affraid then would be a lot of incompatible bayonets and all filter manufacturer would make their products for canikon only.
Regards,
Gábor
My website
My PPG site
Last Edited by szgabor on 18/10/2012 - 05:59
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