My first photo post: Flower Macros for C&C plz


Utopia Poppy

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 01:17
I've finally plucked up the courage to show some of my flower shots.
All taken handheld with my tamron 90mm, manual focus and low light!
I definitely need to get me a tripod!

Well, here they are, C&C welcome (good and bad otherwise I'll never learn!)

Thanks in advance

Fiona
















"Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep". ~Scott Adams

Q | Various Q lenses & filters | KP | 35mm 2.8 Macro

Mike-P

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 06:59
To me they seem to lack punch, they look a bit flat. Maybe a bit more contrast when you do the processing in your chosen programme..
Saying that I tend to go overboard anyway.

As a fore instance, I prefer the first one like this .. but im sure others will like it slightly different.



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johnriley

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 07:58
The biggest improvement will be had by using a tripod. Then you can stop down the lens and get some depth of field, which is narrow enough at close distances.

For macro shots a good solid tripod is the only way. Not a flimsy plastic one but as heavy a one as you can put up with. I use a Manfrotto 055 Classic, but there are others just as good.
Best regards, John

yelvertoft

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 09:19
Agree with John that a GOOD triod is essential for macro work, I'll second his recommendation of a Manfrotto 055 too, don't waste your money on the path of cheap tripods and constant upgrading like I did. You're far better off financially biting a very hard bullet and getting it right first time.

Love the composition of the daisy shot, if that's what it is, I'm talking about number 3. Shame the light isn't fully on hte flower, and the bug adds a really nice touch. Considdering this is hand-held it's remarkably sharp.

Duncan

Mike-P

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 09:30
I must admit that only once have I used a tripod for a macro shot and it came out terrible.
Perhaps because it is a lightweight travel type .. maybe I should also invest in a decent heavyweight one as well.
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hefty1

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 09:57
I'm with the buy-a-heavy-tripod-for-macro brigade too, but I think some of your compositions are on the right lines. I especially like numbers 2, 3 and 4 above (1 and 5 are a little too "centred" - remind me of place mats). In fact I'd say the field daisy (#3) is pretty much perfect as it is in terms of composition, focus and depth of field - more like that please!
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Darkmunk

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 10:17
once you've bought your big heavy tripod, you will then need to stop the wind blowing....
if you are only going to view them on screen (small) then boosting the ISO is acceptable, otherwise you're stuck with 100 ISO for creamy backgrounds.
Boosting the iSO will enable more DOF.
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Utopia Poppy

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 10:45
Thank you for all your comments. Danny (Unlocker) actually has a fairly heavy tripod he's not using... so that just might find it's way into my hands! I agree that some of the shots (No.s 1 and 2 especially) lack "punch". I was afraid of "upping" anything as they were so delicately coloured to begin with. I shall have a play. The daisy is also my favourite, and whilst contending with staying still myself, and waiting for the wind to die down, I didn't even notice the little aphid guy! Bonus!

The daisies are a large wild variety that were growing in the hedges. I don't know whether it was the light, but they do appear more like sunflowers in the shot!

I am also experimenting with composition and cropping at the moment, something I didn't really think of before (see my entry for this week's comp) so your commments on the composition are very helpful too.

Thanks and keep 'em coming!

Fiona
"Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep". ~Scott Adams

Q | Various Q lenses & filters | KP | 35mm 2.8 Macro

MX veteran

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 11:00
I'm in agreement about the heavy tripod. I also lock up the mirror when possible to further reduce vibration.
K100D Super, 18-55, 50-200, Sigma 10-20, Sigma 70mm macro and lots of old lenses

Daniel Bridge

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 11:59
A tripod for flower shots like these really does help I find, not necessarily for allowing a smaller aperture for more depth of field (I happen to like the look of a narrow DoF with flower shots), but to allow you to focus on the critical point. That might mean taking several shots with the same composition, just 'bracketing' the focus.

I love the soft muted tones some of these have got, 'punch' isn't suited to all subjects.

No. 1 - I would have been tempted to go for a more central composition, and perhaps cropped down to a square. So what if it looks like a coaster? Still a nice picture, and not a viewpoint you normally get with Clover. Perhaps a little more contrast might bring out the detailing a bit, but I do think Sockpuppet's gone overboard.

Dan
K-3, a macro lens and a DA*300mm...

Mike-P

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 12:15
Daniel Bridge wrote:
Perhaps a little more contrast might bring out the detailing a bit, but I do think Sockpuppet's gone overboard.

Dan

As I said, it's all a matter of taste ..
I prefer more impact, others will want it more subtle.
I have only been at this dslr lark for a couple of months myself.
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Daniel Bridge

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 12:58
sockpuppet wrote:
As I said, it's all a matter of taste ..

Absolutely! Where would we be if we all like the same thing?

Dan
K-3, a macro lens and a DA*300mm...

Utopia Poppy

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 13:07
Daniel Bridge wrote:


No. 1 - I would have been tempted to go for a more central composition, and perhaps cropped down to a square. So what if it looks like a coaster? Still a nice picture, and not a viewpoint you normally get with Clover. Perhaps a little more contrast might bring out the detailing a bit, but I do think Sockpuppet's gone overboard.

Dan

Funnily enough I did compose number 1 centrally and cropped it slightly off-centre. The original shot didn't look interesting to me, tried to crop it so it was in the corner but looked a little too much like a placemat or an advert missing text. I guess composition is all down to trial and error. I have a background in graphic design so always try to compose or crop differently to the norm. Not always a good idea, I know.

Fiona
"Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep". ~Scott Adams

Q | Various Q lenses & filters | KP | 35mm 2.8 Macro

kerrowdown

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 20:50
Just a thought Fiona, for flowers nature and stuff, try to get a shot/loan/steal of a Benbo tripod, you will find it as all the guys say here heavy enough, but also has a unique action in use with the added benefit of water proof due to its leg construction. These can also be bought on Ebay for not much money these days.
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johnriley

Link Posted 20/06/2008 - 20:59
Quote:
Benbo tripod

I have one of these, and as stated it has a unique construction that means that the legs can be used in water.

Now if someone were to offer training on refolding the thing so it fits back in the bag, that would be a major benefit....I've wrestled with the Benbo for many happy hours and finally, yes, finally I think I've tamed it.

Good luck!
Best regards, John
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