I need advice, again


Corker2211

Link Posted 23/07/2011 - 15:14
With my Pentax K100D there is a knob, on the top left, that you can turn for different functions for the Camera. One of them is the AV.

I'm reading that if you turn to this setting, you can change the AV to smaller or larger focus. The higher the number, the more focus you get. The smaller the number, the less focus you have. Is that right?

So, that means that when I shoot a close up, like I've been trying, I should make the number bigger to get more focus on my subject? However, if you change the knob back to Auto Pict will that change what I have just used on AV or will it automatically adjust to the Image I'm taking?

Les
"Those who do nothing . . . make no mistakes in Life"

http://s404.Photobucket.com/home/Corker2/index

I'm just full of questions . . . It's the only way I learn anything! I have so, so, much to learn using my Pentax K100D DSLR

Gwyn

Link Posted 23/07/2011 - 15:34
The higher the number the smaller the aperture, the greater the depth of field - ie the more of the photo is in focus, but less light gets in so the shutter speed is slower.

The lower the number the wider the aperture, so more light, faster shutter speed, but shallower depth of field.

Have a play and you will find out when you want to use what aperture. generally lenses are not at their sharpest when wide open - low aperture number.

Helpful

Frogfish

Link Posted 23/07/2011 - 16:20
Les. It's not quite as simple as just deciding how much of the subject you want in focus, though that is of course one of the factors for consideration, as there is the relationship of the holy trinity of Focus + Shutter Speed + ISO that comes into play with every shot. When you change one of them that will affect one (or both) of the others depending on what it is you are shooting and what you are trying to achieve.

I think the best advice I can give here is to search the net for articles on the trinity - Photography on the Net, Luminous Landscape etc. may have lessons that can explain this interaction far better than I can. However it is imperative this to learn to be able to progress.

I would then suggest just playing around with the settings and watching what happens to the others when you change one of them and then maybe trying to set the camera to M to set them all yourself and see the effects each setting has on your test shots when you change them.

Good luck !
http://frogfish.smugmug.com/ Pentax. Pentax DA*300/4, Cosina 55/1.2, Lens Baby Composer Pro & Edge 80, AFA x1.7, Metz 50 af1.
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Last Edited by Frogfish on 23/07/2011 - 16:23

Hardgravity

Link Posted 23/07/2011 - 16:23
This LINK and this LINK will help you understand how the aperture on your lens works.
Hope this helps.
Cheers, HG

K110+DA40, K200+DA35, K5+Tammy 18-250, a bag of lenses, bodies and other bits.

Mustn't forget the Zenits, or folders, or...

I've some gallerieshere CLICKY LINK! and my PPG entries.

Helpful

Corker2211

Link Posted 25/07/2011 - 13:21
Hardgravity wrote:
This LINK and this LINK will help you understand how the aperture on your lens works.
Hope this helps.

Gwyn wrote:
The higher the number the smaller the aperture, the greater the depth of field - ie the more of the photo is in focus, but less light gets in so the shutter speed is slower.

The lower the number the wider the aperture, so more light, faster shutter speed, but shallower depth of field.

Have a play and you will find out when you want to use what aperture. generally lenses are not at their sharpest when wide open - low aperture number.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP. Those LINKS that you provided are just full of information that I will read. It sure will take awhile to "digest" all of what is described.

Les
"Those who do nothing . . . make no mistakes in Life"

http://s404.Photobucket.com/home/Corker2/index

I'm just full of questions . . . It's the only way I learn anything! I have so, so, much to learn using my Pentax K100D DSLR
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