I'm beginning to take this photography lark seriously.


prsjnb

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 10:34
beakynet wrote:
Rab,

I have just taken my 7 year old PC and thrown it in a skip (minus the hard drive!) and built a shiny new one. My advice is if you are going with Photoshop, then a good graphics card is essential as I believe that Photoshop is able to use the power of the GPU, making it out perform most other packages.

No disrespect intended, beakynet, but there would be no discernable (real-world) benefit from buying a £300.00 graphics monster over a £35.00 - £50.00 'bottom of the range' card, as even the most basic of today's GPUs are more than up to the task of dealing with any task that Photoshop might chose to 'offload' to it without, as it were, 'breaking into a sweat'

Your'e advice re the importance of a 64-bit OS with plenty of RAM, however, is spot on, as is the use of an SSD to host the OS and Photoshop

My other suggestion for any 'new build' would be to allow a decent amount for a top quality monitor and calibration tool.

Jon

beakynet

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 11:20
[quote:3496ace15f="prsjnb

No disrespect intended, beakynet, but there would be no discernable (real-world) benefit from buying a £300.00 graphics monster over a £35.00 - £50.00 'bottom of the range' card[/quote]

Jon, I was delibertly unspacific with regard to the card, interstingly I think the sweet spot for graphics cards are around the £60 - £70 mark. I agree on GPUs but not all graphics cards have the same quality of graphics RAM - this is where the difference is - cheap cards generally have slower memory.

Re the monitor, I just purchased a 21.5" full HD monitor with 2ms response time for £103 Calibration is using Pantone Huey.
Bodies: K5IIs, K7, MZ5n, LX, MV
Lenses: DA*16-50, DA18-55WR, DA18-135, DAL35, M50 F2, A50 f1.4, FA50 f1.4, DA*50-135, DA55-300, Tamron 70-300, DFA 100 WR Macro, M135 f3.5, Sigma 120-400 APO DG HSM, Tokina 500 f8.0
Flash: Metz 58, Metz 48
Accessories: BG4, Pentax right angle finder, Pentax mirror adaptor lens, O-ME53 Viewfinder Loupe
Auto 110 System: Auto 110, Winder, 18mm, 24mm, 50mm, 70mm, 20-40mm, AF100P, 1.7x telecon

pentax

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 11:35
If you check the specs for using lightroom on the Adobe site you do not need anything fancy
Derek

Spaceman_Spiff

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 11:47
Before blowing a load of cash for a faster system it's ALWAYS worth while checking to see if you can speed up your existing system. Often, over time, your processing speed can become seriously depleted from numerous programme updates, patches, software you may have tried loading and numerous things that can run in the background unnoticed but that you never actually need. I'm talking here about stuff like media players, system trays, instant messenger systems, quick start applications and the like. They all sit there doing nothing but eating resources, using RAM. It might be worth doing a clean re-install of windows and begin again but just add the programmes you really want, not the pointless extras. At the same time go to crucial.com and use the free scan tool to check if you're fully loaded. Doing these things can double the speed of an existing system and might save you hundreds of quid (for a new lens instead )
Better equipment enhances my ability to display my shortcomings.

jules

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 12:16
RAIDS are good but then so is an external, both is even better but too much redundancy for most, i recently lost both Raided Drives in my old PC but hat a 2TB external Backup with all my Photies on! Graphics cards are a stranger one, Macs can use the Graphics card Memory first if you want and leave system Memory alone a bit.
Win7 is similar.
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/windows-graphics-ram-desktop-memory,7644.html
So for certain (Lower end) systems it can be an advantage, so these days it's worth paying a little more for a reasonable Graphics Card but not something stratospheric as thats completely over the top...

There is a slight decrease in Gaming performance here but for Photoshop etc there are real gains..

Jules
MCDST MCTS MCITP

Cheers Jules...
tri-elmar-fudd

Back in the room!
“The single most important component of a camera is the twelve inches behind it.”...Ansel Adams
www.exaggeratedperspectives.com
Last Edited by jules on 27/02/2012 - 12:30

greynolds999

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 12:44
No number of backups is any good if they are all in the same location. If you have a theft or a fire you may lose everything.

A home backup is good, but an offline backup is essential! There are many which are free for small amounts of data, but the best I have found is www.livedrive.com for £40 a year to be excellent.
My Photobucket

jules

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 13:09
Still don't trust online backup and without any good reason not to either! I'll get there in the end toough as will most I feel...
It's funny, people won't spend £40 for a years online backup but they'll go out and spend over hundred on a USB3 External, just to have it at home, theres no reason as you clearly state that it is safer but for some reason it feels it...
Cheers Jules...
tri-elmar-fudd

Back in the room!
“The single most important component of a camera is the twelve inches behind it.”...Ansel Adams
www.exaggeratedperspectives.com

George Lazarette

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 13:27
greynolds999 wrote:
No number of backups is any good if they are all in the same location. If you have a theft or a fire you may lose everything.

A home backup is good, but an offline backup is essential! There are many which are free for small amounts of data, but the best I have found is www.livedrive.com for £40 a year to be excellent.

It's an off-site back-up which is essential, whether it's drives or tapes or internet-based. Always bear in mind that if there is a lot of data (picture files are large) then restoring from an off-line back-up might take a long time.

The advantage of off-line back-up is convenience, but you need to check every now and again that it works. Every company back-up system I have ever experienced has had glitches or malfunctions in one form or another.

G
Keywords: Charming, polite, and generally agreeable.
Last Edited by George Lazarette on 27/02/2012 - 13:27

jules

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 14:19
Quite a lot of industry is still using tape backups, last large IT firm I worked for had a big contract with Capita Symonds and we were backing up to 28 tapes at the end of every week there! That was about twelve months ago and before my total midlife crisis!
No more IT for me!

I think Internet Based (Cloud) will be the way forward for storage as it's just so scaleable and convenient, and with the drive to boost everyones internet speeds a bit. It may/will become quite realistic to back up large amounts of files but industry wide there is a lot of mistrust, it will get there, some like me need safeguards for the safeguards, I'm a bit of a luddite methinks...
Cheers Jules...
tri-elmar-fudd

Back in the room!
“The single most important component of a camera is the twelve inches behind it.”...Ansel Adams
www.exaggeratedperspectives.com

greynolds999

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 14:28
I accept that there are some industries still using tapes, mainly because of existing hardware, but the days of home users using tapes are long over.
My Photobucket

beakynet

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 14:30
greynolds999 wrote:
Tapes! What century are you living in?

Supprisingly tapes are still very viable cost effective option with a 20year shelf life. For most though the cost of the tape drive would not be justifiable though 1.6TB in the space of a DAT tape does have a certain appeal!

I back up my photos to a 500GB Archos media player as well as external USB 3 1tb drive. The advantage of the Archos device is that I can take it on holiday and download pictures each night to keep the holiday snaps safer. Oh and while it is on holiday with me, it is an off-site backup!

I used to used double layer DVDs, but when I got to 6 it all became a little too tedious.
Bodies: K5IIs, K7, MZ5n, LX, MV
Lenses: DA*16-50, DA18-55WR, DA18-135, DAL35, M50 F2, A50 f1.4, FA50 f1.4, DA*50-135, DA55-300, Tamron 70-300, DFA 100 WR Macro, M135 f3.5, Sigma 120-400 APO DG HSM, Tokina 500 f8.0
Flash: Metz 58, Metz 48
Accessories: BG4, Pentax right angle finder, Pentax mirror adaptor lens, O-ME53 Viewfinder Loupe
Auto 110 System: Auto 110, Winder, 18mm, 24mm, 50mm, 70mm, 20-40mm, AF100P, 1.7x telecon

George Lazarette

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 14:39
Mr Reynolds,

When somebody I respect and admire is unkind, I feel wounded. Deeply wounded.

Thank you for pointing out my error. It is always good to have errors of fact corrected, and I am indebted to you for that.

Thank you, too, Jules, for your input, and for adding to Mr R's store of knowledge about the present century.

Now, wasn't that humble, conciliatory and diplomatic?

G
Keywords: Charming, polite, and generally agreeable.

jules

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 14:59
greynolds999 wrote:
I accept that there are some industries still using tapes, mainly because of existing hardware, but the days of home users using tapes are long over.

You are completely correct there, I meant to add that in, I have a tape drive in the drawer at home an Iomega if I'm not mistaken, payed a fortune for it and it's not worth fifty pence now, just no market for it...
Cheers Jules...
tri-elmar-fudd

Back in the room!
“The single most important component of a camera is the twelve inches behind it.”...Ansel Adams
www.exaggeratedperspectives.com

greynolds999

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 15:20
May years ago I worked for a software house. A customer called as they were trying to restore their data onto a new machine as there old hard drive had gone down (in the days when that used to happen a lot).

They were backing up to 5 sets (1 set per day) of 6 x 5.25" inch floppies and said that every time they put disc #1 in the message said 'insert disc #1'.

I got them to try each disc in turn (from each backup set) but they got the same message. I finally asked how they did their backup.

The customer explained that they began with disc #1 and used each disc in turn until they got to #6. The system then asked for disk #7. They didn't have a disc #7 so they put disc #1 in again!

There was a long pause...!

(I think we charged them a small fortune to recover what data we could from the rest of the discs).
My Photobucket

jules

Link Posted 27/02/2012 - 16:01

Cheers Jules...
tri-elmar-fudd

Back in the room!
“The single most important component of a camera is the twelve inches behind it.”...Ansel Adams
www.exaggeratedperspectives.com
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