Hyperfocal distance on a DSLR


Simonmac

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 11:25
Hi all

I have recently bought a number of manual lenses for my K-r.

When I used film I often used hyperfocal using the distance scale and aperture markings on the lens.

I presume this is possible with a DSLR and manual lenses if you take in to account the smaller sensor as compared to film?

Could somebody please enlighten me? Would it be as simple as configuring the HF at a smaller aperture than set on the lens?

Many thanks

Mac
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redbusa99

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 11:46
search "cambridge in colour" they have a tutorial on hyperfocal distance as well as calculators that you could use to download the distances for the focal lenth of your lenses at all f numbers. for ref circle of confusion for Pentax is .02
very usefull site for all things photographic , hope this helps
odd lens or 2

Flickr

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MattMatic

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 11:47
It's worth playing about with the following Depth Of Field Calcultor
http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html

It gives near, far, and hyperfocal distance for various sensors and settings!
Matt
http://www.mattmatic.co.uk
(For gallery, tips and links)

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Simonmac

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 11:58
Great replies!
What I want to know is whether or not if, for example, I set the F stop at F4 that using F5.6 on the lens for HF would be the equivalent of F4 on a film camera?

Does that make any sense at all!!!??? Lol.

Mac
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bforbes

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 12:17
I thought the crop factor just applied to the focal length not the aperture. I've just got my head around hyperfocal distance using John Riley's articles https://www.pentaxuser.com/article/pentax-user-archive--through-the-eyes-of-pent...
Barrie
Too Old To Die Young

http://www.pentaxphotogallery.com/artists/barrieforbes
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johnriley

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 12:19
Page 94 of the K-5 manual tells us that the DOF difference is one aperture stop compared to a 35mm film camera.
Best regards, John

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bforbes

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 12:28
Does that mean if you set infinity at f16 the DOF will only be between the f11 marks
Barrie
Too Old To Die Young

http://www.pentaxphotogallery.com/artists/barrieforbes
https://www.flickr.com/photos/189482630@N03/

Simonmac

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 12:45
THe other way round. If I set F8 on the camera- I would use F11 on the distance scale as the sensor is smaller than film.
bforbes wrote:
Does that mean if you set infinity at f16 the DOF will only be between the f11 marks


macmccreery.com
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Simonmac

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 12:46
Thanks John. THta is what I suspected. Mac
johnriley wrote:
Page 94 of the K-5 manual tells us that the DOF difference is one aperture stop compared to a 35mm film camera.


macmccreery.com
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www.500px.com/simac

johnriley

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 13:00
Rather than make comparisons though, just bear in mind that smaller formats show more DOF.

Then forget comparisons altogether and just stick to learning what the format you use can do.

There was never a published "120 format-equivalent" figure for the benefit of 35mm users. The only reason we now have "35mm-equivalent" is that digital is not just one format, but many different formats. It gives at least some reference point between cameras.
Best regards, John

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Simonmac

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 13:02
THank you John
johnriley wrote:
Rather than make comparisons though, just bear in mind that smaller formats show more DOF.

Then forget comparisons altogether and just stick to learning what the format you use can do.

There was never a published "120 format-equivalent" figure for the benefit of 35mm users. The only reason we now have "35mm-equivalent" is that digital is not just one format, but many different formats. It gives at least some reference point between cameras.


macmccreery.com
www.flickr.com/photos/simac/
www.500px.com/simac

petrochemist

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 14:14
johnriley wrote:
Rather than make comparisons though, just bear in mind that smaller formats show more DOF.

Then forget comparisons altogether and just stick to learning what the format you use can do.

There was never a published "120 format-equivalent" figure for the benefit of 35mm users. The only reason we now have "35mm-equivalent" is that digital is not just one format, but many different formats. It gives at least some reference point between cameras.

Surely '120 format' never existed either, 120 film is used in a range of different formats from 6*4.5 to 6*12 from what I've read (My own MF being a 6*9).
Mike
.
Pentax:K5ii, K7, K100D, DA18-55, DA10-17, DA55-300, DA50-200, F100-300, F50, DA35 AL, 4* M50, 2* M135, Helicoid extension, Tak 300 f4 (& 6 film bodies)
3rd Party: Bigmos (Sigma 150-500mm OS HSM),2* 28mm, 100mm macro, 28-200 zoom, 35-80 zoom, 80-200 zoom, 80-210 zoom, 300mm M42, 600 mirror, 1000-4000 scope, 50mm M42, enlarger lenses, Sony & micro 4/3 cameras with various PK mounts, Zenit E...
Far to many tele-converters, adapters, project parts & extension tubes etc.

.[size=11:].Flickr WPF Panoramio

johnriley

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 14:55
You're right Mike, but I was just making a point. Most 120 film cameras in living memory were 6x6cm, so we could take that as our example.
Best regards, John

pentaxian450

Link Posted 25/01/2013 - 16:23
Remember the DOF scale is for an average enlargement of about 8 X 10. If you go for a larger size, you need to take that into account, e.g. use a smaller aperture.
Yves (another one of those crazy Canucks)
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