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Holy Trinity, Stratford upon Avon


RobL

Link Posted 17/01/2019 - 17:26
Just before Christmas I popped into the church and loved the effect of the low winter sun shining through the clerestorey windows, so at the first opportunity I returned with the Samyang 24mm TS lens and a tripod. I had to wait an hour for the church to open after a funeral and grabbed a shot inside before a horde of tourists descended; also tried a panorama but after stitching the structure was ok but the pews were bent so I prefer this single shot. Whilst waiting I took a couple outside. All exposed to the right so minimal processing, mainly reducing the highlights.






Ps the shift lens took care of the verticals, so no post correction required.
Last Edited by RobL on 17/01/2019 - 17:57

smudge

Link Posted 18/01/2019 - 08:56
I have been considering buying one of these TS lenses for a while so these shots are of particular interest to me. Would I actually use it much? I'm not sure.


The exposure looks spot on. The textures show nicely. The verticals are sorted. To my eyes the interior shot shows a small amount of barrel distortion and some horizontal distortion, particularly evident in the roof timbers. I hope you don't mind but had a quick go at adjusting this in PS elements to see what it looks like.



Edit: Looking at it I think I may have over corrected slightly. Now the pews look a bit off. It's also interesting to see how reloading the image onto the forum has degraded the colour and detail somewhere along the line.
Regards, Philip
Last Edited by smudge on 18/01/2019 - 09:08

RobL

Link Posted 18/01/2019 - 19:21
Thanks Smudge I was a bit concerned how the roof timbers are a bit skewed. In Lightroom the TS isnít listed in the lens compensation so I applied another Samyang 24mm which may account for the barrel distortion because it was quite significant. Thinking now the lens is offset from the sensor so probably I shouldnít make any correction, however the roof was not noticeably different straight out the camera so I cannot explain it.

I donít use the lens as much as I should because it needs to be on tripod and involves spending a little time; the tilt is a great way to get front to back sharpness at a wider aperture like f8 and you can see how well the shift works. Like all TS lenses itís manual focus and using the focus assist in live view with zooming in helps a great deal, and get it right it is very sharp.

HarisF1

Link Posted 18/01/2019 - 20:32
The corrections are intriguing. It's always a bummer when your perfectly shifted images have another difficult aspect in them (such as a side building that's closer). The roof beams might be bent due to the original position or direction of the shot. Any angle will have a large impact on perspective, so it seems as though you may have been standing closer to the right side and aiming slightly to the left (or vice versa).

I've got one of these waiting in the wings. It'll be useless for normal shooting simply due to size but one day it'll be completely in its element for that one shot.

RobL

Link Posted 18/01/2019 - 21:55
HarisF1 wrote:
The corrections are intriguing. It's always a bummer when your perfectly shifted images have another difficult aspect in them (such as a side building that's closer). The roof beams might be bent due to the original position or direction of the shot. Any angle will have a large impact on perspective, so it seems as though you may have been standing closer to the right side and aiming slightly to the left (or vice versa).

I've got one of these waiting in the wings. It'll be useless for normal shooting simply due to size but one day it'll be completely in its element for that one shot.

Yes, I had lined up on the font thinking it was on the axis but it was probably a bit off. Whilst I was trying a panorama the verger plonked a huge candlestick between me and the font as if I was invisible! And I did get his permission first.

MrB

Link Posted 19/01/2019 - 14:37
As you probably realise, Rob, I enjoy photographing old churches and other old buildings, so I also enjoy seeing your work here.

I don't have a shift lens - they are rather expensive, and I prefer smaller/lighter lenses on a hand-held camera. So, for example, all the images in my latest thread of Great Missenden Church were corrected for vertical perspective using Paintshop Pro. However, just as a matter of interest, I was wondering if you have ever compared results using software correction and shift lens correction - is there any obvious difference in the final images?

Philip

RobL

Link Posted 19/01/2019 - 18:00
MrB, it depends on how much correction is needed, I often fine tune in Lightroom or DXO Viewpoint but the penalty is losing some image by cropping to fit so you end up compromising between perfect verticals and keeping part of the image. With a shift lens you get it right in camera. And you do get noticeable distortion with software as you push it, both in proportion and stretching. The TS lens is actually reproducing the flexibility of old plate cameras with their accordion-like construction between body and lens.

I am far more comfortable using the TS lens on a tripod with a three-way head so I can fine tune the framing, and especially so using the tilt as you have to keep adjusting the degree of shift and the manual focus in live view because the focal plane is no longer vertical.

MrB

Link Posted 19/01/2019 - 18:51
Thank you for the info, Rob - interesting stuff and I now understand that the shift lens is 'getting it right in camera', allowing use of the whole frame. I have to take care to ensure that more of the scene is included, because of the cropping needed after correcting the perspective in software - sometimes quite a lot of the image can be lost.

Philip

RobL

Link Posted 20/01/2019 - 08:44
I should add that to keep the verticals vertical the camera must be level in all planes, tilting up or down will negate the benefit, and particularly with the Samyang adjusting the shift is easier with two hands as the button is quite small and fiddly; there is the weight of the glass to move vertically so I literally give it a helping hand. For these reasons a tripod is pretty much essential.
Last Edited by RobL on 20/01/2019 - 08:44

Sry

Link Posted 21/01/2019 - 20:39
I actually think the skewed beams bring a welcome oddness to the image - makes it a rather interesting shot.
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