Help please with an MX


Jonathan-Mac

Link Posted 15/03/2012 - 16:19
I've posted this over on the American forum too, but hoping to get more input from here as I know there are plenty of film users still about.

I have just finished my first ever roll of film through my new (to me) MX.

I depressed the film rewind button underneath and wound back the film clockwise (as indicated by the arrow) until it would not go any more. When I release the handle it spins back a bit in the opposite direction. I opened the back of the camera but I can see that the film still runs across to the other side, it hasn't run back into the cartridge. I imagine I will have ruined several exposures opening the door.

I've tried again and again, and although the release button clicks down into position, it does not release the film take-up sprocket inside the camera.

I've taken the base-plate off and had a look inside the base. There was a small amount of gunk in there (from the old seals no doubt) but not much and not where it would affect what's causing the problem. I think the sprocket must be jammed inside & the only way to un-jam it will be to open it all up, destroying the film, and have a poke about. I was really looking forward to seeing my first results from this camera .

Any idea what has gone wrong & how I can fix it without losing the rest of the film?

Many thanks
Pentax hybrid user - Digital K3 & K200D, film 645 and 35mm SLR and Pentax (&other) lenses adapted to Fuji X digital
Fan of DA limited and old manual lenses

steven9761

Link Posted 15/03/2012 - 16:47
I would have thought that when you were rewinding, you would have noticed a bit of resistance/tension, suggesting that it's winding back into the cartridge okay.

I'd suggest firstly getting a dark (or preferably black) bag of some sorts, wait until night-time, get yourself into a totally darkened room (shut your curtains, seal any straylight coming in from underneath doors, etc), then set about releasing the film from the take-up reel, and finally winding it back into the cartridge. It's yonks since I opened up the back of a 35mm slr, but I seem to recall that there is a small release "button" close to the take-up reel. If this is the case, press it in to release the ratchet, then unwind your film off of it, and safely back into the cartridge housing.

Once you have followed the above, then you can try examining the "gubbins" on the cartridge-side of the camera, to see why it is not rewinding. It sounds to me as though it's a ratchet/sprocket issue on the winding mechanism which, with a bit of cleaning, should (hopefully) resolve the issue for you.
Last Edited by steven9761 on 15/03/2012 - 16:48

johnriley

Link Posted 15/03/2012 - 17:36
Assuming there's nothing mechanically amiss, the process starts with loading the film.

Push the leader firmly into the magic needles take up spool, make sure the cassette is in the chamber flat and, holding it there with a finger, rewind slightly to take up any slack or bend in the film. Make sure the sprockets are properly located also. Then wind on at least twice before closing the back, to make sure the film is located and winding properly.

Next, make two blank exposures and note that the rewind crank is rotating as you wind on. This indicates correct film transport.

When rewinding at the end of the film, press the rewind release and make sure it stays in as you gently rewind. If you judge the point at which the film releases from the magic needles and stop there you will avoid completely rewinding into the cassette. This will make loading the film onto a developing tank spiral much easier.

Of course some previous owner may have damaged the mechanism and then we have a different problem. Go into the dark (complete blackness) and give your eyes a few minutes to get used to the dark. There may be more light leaking into a room than you think. In complete darkness, open the camera, remove the cassette carefully and rewind free of the camera as best you can. Very slow, but it can be done.

Hope that helps!
Best regards, John
Last Edited by johnriley on 15/03/2012 - 17:38

doingthebobs

Link Posted 15/03/2012 - 19:03
I always used to do the work under the bedclothes, in the darkened room. Just to make sure.

I have a changing bag now, but still darken the room. It is good to practice finding your way around the camera.
Bob
Last Edited by doingthebobs on 15/03/2012 - 19:03

coker

Link Posted 15/03/2012 - 19:40
I always found with my MX that, when getting near to the end of rewinding,the tightening of the film onto the take-up spool imparted a certain "spring" to the spool, which was only released when the magic needles "let go".
When you get to the point where "it won't go anymore", apply a little more pressure on the rewind crank & the needles will let go. You WILL feel that release of the tension.
One just has to be careful, thereafter, not to continue rewinding, lest the leader goes into the cassette as well!

Hope this helps,

Roger.
The more I look, the more there is to see!

davem

Link Posted 15/03/2012 - 19:42
[quote:3496ace15f="doingthebobs"]I always used to do the work under the bedclothes, in the darkened room. Just to make sure. quote]

I thought all childen did that

gartmore

Link Posted 15/03/2012 - 20:32
You know, film is just as susceptible to getting 'sensor dust' as digital. White marks on your prints are dust on the neg. Black marks are dust on the film. Under the bedclothes a seriously bad place for film
Ken
“We must avoid however, snapping away, shooting quickly and without thought, overloading ourselves with unnecessary images that clutter our memory and diminish the clarity of the whole.” - Henri Cartier-Bresson -

gartmore

Link Posted 15/03/2012 - 20:41
If the rewind lever is turning and there isn't some ridiculous tension you have to overcome, then I suspect the little prongs that engage with the top of the film cartridge might not be doing their job. Take that roll out of the camera, its ruined anyway, unless John is right. How much is protruding from the cartridge? If its the whole roll you'll know; if its just 10cms or so then it never wound on in the first place.

I think you should rewind the roll so that the tongue is just protruding and then leaving the back of the camera open, load the film and wind on, press the shutter, wind on etc. This will let you know if the camera is winding on correctly.

If it is, press the rewind button on the baseplate and attempt to rewind the film into the cassette. What happens?
Ken
“We must avoid however, snapping away, shooting quickly and without thought, overloading ourselves with unnecessary images that clutter our memory and diminish the clarity of the whole.” - Henri Cartier-Bresson -

Jonathan-Mac

Link Posted 15/03/2012 - 21:13
coker wrote:
I always found with my MX that, when getting near to the end of rewinding,the tightening of the film onto the take-up spool imparted a certain "spring" to the spool, which was only released when the magic needles "let go".
When you get to the point where "it won't go anymore", apply a little more pressure on the rewind crank & the needles will let go. You WILL feel that release of the tension.
One just has to be careful, thereafter, not to continue rewinding, lest the leader goes into the cassette as well!

Hope this helps,

Roger.

This seems to be exactly what has happened. I took the advice from Steven9761 (many thanks, I hadn't thought of that) and opened the camera to remove the film. It turned out that it had rewound but the tip of the film was extremely well stuck in the magic needles and wouldn't let go. I was applying a LOT of pressure rewinding the film and was worried I would tear the film or break the rewind lever. The rewind release button works perfectly.

So the only part of the film that has been exposed in the removal process is the first part, which was exposed anyway when I loaded the film. Fingers crossed it will turn out ok. Of course, as it's the test roll, there may be light leaks or shutter timing problems or other issues that have messed up the photos. But you never know until you try.

Thanks everyone for the help, I knew I could count on the experience here for some good advice.
Pentax hybrid user - Digital K3 & K200D, film 645 and 35mm SLR and Pentax (&other) lenses adapted to Fuji X digital
Fan of DA limited and old manual lenses
Add a Comment
You must be registered or logged-in to comment.