Good prime lens choice for catching toddler action shots


mattie

Link Posted 21/03/2022 - 12:12
johnriley wrote:
Try using centre weighted metering and appying -0.3 EV exposure compensation. Works for me.

Ta John, will give it a go - I'm perfectly fine with a bit of vignette-like exposure so happy to go with centre-weight.

Lubbyman

Link Posted 21/03/2022 - 12:20
As you will know, matrix metering tries to get a reasonably good exposure taking the entire picture into account so whatever else is in the frame as well as faces will affect the exposure. The only way of being really sure of whether the lens is affecting exposure is to take exactly the same picture with a different lens. I've seen K3 + matrix metering exposure change significantly just by moving the camera slightly.

You could try centre-weighted metering and compensate for whether the face is lighter or darker than mid-grey, exposure should be pretty good if the face occupies a fair fraction of the centre. (Johnriley just beat me to it!)

Steve

Jonathan-Mac

Link Posted 21/03/2022 - 13:41
My A series 28mm f/2.8 lens consistently over-exposes by a stop or a little less. It's the only lens I've ever come across that does that.
Pentax hybrid user - Digital K3 & K200D, film 645 and 35mm SLR and Pentax (&other) lenses adapted to Fuji X digital
Fan of DA limited and old manual lenses

mattie

Link Posted 22/03/2022 - 09:43
Lubbyman wrote:
As you will know, matrix metering tries to get a reasonably good exposure taking the entire picture into account so whatever else is in the frame as well as faces will affect the exposure. The only way of being really sure of whether the lens is affecting exposure is to take exactly the same picture with a different lens. I've seen K3 + matrix metering exposure change significantly just by moving the camera slightly.

You could try centre-weighted metering and compensate for whether the face is lighter or darker than mid-grey, exposure should be pretty good if the face occupies a fair fraction of the centre. (Johnriley just beat me to it!)

Steve

Ta Steve - the overexposure is actually pretty consistent across a number of images, I'll try with other lenses but I'll give centre weight a go. As mentioned above, I'm usually framing the kids in the centre of the image so getting this exposed correctly is the most important. Really want to avoid spot as it's just another thing to worry about - enough on hands stopping them from killing each other!

Lubbyman

Link Posted 22/03/2022 - 10:49
Before cameras acquired computers, centre weighted was the best there was if you didn't want to mess around with spot. A lot of very, very good photos were taken with it and nobody complained that they wouldn't be able to get a decent exposure until matrix metering was invented!

Steve

womble

Link Posted 22/03/2022 - 16:14
Whenever I really want to make sure I don't miss a shot and the exposure is problematic I use the auto-bracketing feature then bin the shots I'm not happy with. Rattling off three or five exposures at a time is neither here nor there with digital. I'd be less keen to do that with film, especially at current prices.

K.
Kris Lockyear
It is an illusion that photos are made with the camera… they are made with the eye, heart and head. Henri Cartier-Bresson
Lots of film bodies, a couple of digital ones, too many lenses (mainly older glass) and a Horseman LE 5x4.

My website

RayB

Link Posted 22/03/2022 - 17:34
The only two bits of advice I was ever given about shooting images of kids was 1, Don't & 2. If rule 1 can't be applied, try and shoot from their level, it gives a different perspective.

womble

Link Posted 22/03/2022 - 17:35
RayB wrote:
1, Don't...


Kris Lockyear
It is an illusion that photos are made with the camera… they are made with the eye, heart and head. Henri Cartier-Bresson
Lots of film bodies, a couple of digital ones, too many lenses (mainly older glass) and a Horseman LE 5x4.

My website

Jonathan-Mac

Link Posted 23/03/2022 - 10:33
RayB wrote:
The only two bits of advice I was ever given about shooting images of kids was 1, Don't & 2. If rule 1 can't be applied, try and shoot from their level, it gives a different perspective.

I have to say I think the first part is very poor advice (yes, I know it's a bit tongue-in-cheek, but it's disappointing that some people may have that opinion). Children aren't hard to photograph, you just have to learn their habits and how to take full advantage of their behaviour and the available light, and the better you know your way around your camera gear the better too.

The second part is rule #1 really.

There's a small book in Spanish which is about photographing kids, we've given it as a gift to a couple of people who were about to become parents. It's really excellent and everything in it is applicable regardless of the camera being used. I can't seem to find it now to see if it's available in English.
Pentax hybrid user - Digital K3 & K200D, film 645 and 35mm SLR and Pentax (&other) lenses adapted to Fuji X digital
Fan of DA limited and old manual lenses

mattie

Link Posted 23/03/2022 - 12:02
Jonathan-Mac wrote:
RayB wrote:
The only two bits of advice I was ever given about shooting images of kids was 1, Don't & 2. If rule 1 can't be applied, try and shoot from their level, it gives a different perspective.

I have to say I think the first part is very poor advice (yes, I know it's a bit tongue-in-cheek, but it's disappointing that some people may have that opinion). Children aren't hard to photograph, you just have to learn their habits and how to take full advantage of their behaviour and the available light, and the better you know your way around your camera gear the better too.

The second part is rule #1 really.

There's a small book in Spanish which is about photographing kids, we've given it as a gift to a couple of people who were about to become parents. It's really excellent and everything in it is applicable regardless of the camera being used. I can't seem to find it now to see if it's available in English.

I'm definitely getting better at predicting what they'll do, and to be honest I never really like the overly posed photos of kids that you'd get from a studio.

We've actually just had a set of photos done for their ballet performance, the poor photographer had the patience of a saint - and these aren't really the types of photo I'm after, although they are technically very good images.

I'd be grateful for a link to that book if you ever manage to locate it, I'm sure there's a fair few things I'm getting wrong!

Lubbyman

Link Posted 23/03/2022 - 13:29
Jonathan-Mac wrote:
Children aren't hard to photograph, you just have to learn their habits and how to take full advantage of their behaviour and the available light, and the better you know your way around your camera gear the better too.

Same as any wildlife photography...

Steve
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