Down by the river...


Aitch53

Link Posted 15/05/2015 - 09:45
...with the k20d and 50-200mm lens.

Black headed gull


A small flotilla of mallards.


A pair of swans


And a very shy chaffinch!



All quite cropped - I think I should have gone for the 50-300mm!
SteveH!

Some people call me 'strange'.
I prefer 'unconventional'.
But I'm willing to compromise and accept 'eccentric'.

McGregNi

Link Posted 15/05/2015 - 10:23
The swans really stand out here ! Great moment well caught. The wider angle has let your whites blow out a bit, so probably needed to adjust EC for that (compare with your first one, the tighter crop, where the metering has produced a lower exposure).
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Aitch53

Link Posted 15/05/2015 - 10:43
I think the main problem is the fact that most of the frames have a lot of (highly reflective) water in them. Guaranteed to confuse any exposure meter. Except possibly a Weston Master with the invercone in place. Anyone old enough to remember them?

Anyway, a slightly earlier picture of the two swans - where he's chatting her up - with less blown-out whites.


SteveH!

Some people call me 'strange'.
I prefer 'unconventional'.
But I'm willing to compromise and accept 'eccentric'.

McGregNi

Link Posted 15/05/2015 - 10:50
Thats really nice as well !Great how he's looking around towards you. Has those good reflections too I may not be old enough to remember that meter .....
My Guides to the Pentax Digital Camera Flash Lighting System : Download here from the PentaxForums Homepage Article .... link
Pentax K7 with BG-4 Grip / Samyang 14mm f2.8 ED AS IF UMC / DA18-55mm f3.5-5.6 AL WR / SMC A28mm f2.8 / D FA 28-105mm / SMC F35-70 f3.5-4.5 / SMC A50mm f1.7 / Tamron AF70-300mm f4-5.6 Di LD macro / SMC M75-150mm f4.0 / Tamron Adaptall (CT-135) 135mm f2.8 / Asahi Takumar-A 2X tele-converter / Pentax AF-540FGZ (I & II) Flashes / Cactus RF60/X Flashes & V6/V6II Transceiver

fritzthedog

Link Posted 15/05/2015 - 10:55
Aitch53 wrote:
I think the main problem is the fact that most of the frames have a lot of (highly reflective) water in them. Guaranteed to confuse any exposure meter. Except possibly a Weston Master with the invercone in place. Anyone old enough to remember them?


Not only old enough to remember - I still have one that works as well now as it did 30 years ago - although it rarely sees any light these days!

Carl
No matter how many lenses I have owned - I have always needed just one more

gwing

Link Posted 15/05/2015 - 14:17
Aitch53 wrote:
I think the main problem is the fact that most of the frames have a lot of (highly reflective) water in them. Guaranteed to confuse any exposure meter. Except possibly a Weston Master with the invercone in place. Anyone old enough to remember them?

Anyway, a slightly earlier picture of the two swans - where he's chatting her up - with less blown-out whites.


I'm not sure we can blame the tools in this case

If the metering is being confused by the water reflections that means you will get darker images and less problems with blown highlights on the swans. Granted an incident meter isn't going to be confused by the reflections but then you are going to get a normal exposure and the swan will be even more blown out.

The real problem is the dynamic range of the image and the inadvertent but accidentally correct underexposure caused by the water reflections isn't sufficient to put the swan fully within the available DR. What is needed is a tad more deliberate underexposure to keep all that detail in the white feathers. Swan's aren't easy to photograph

davidwozhere

Link Posted 16/05/2015 - 00:52
They may well be hard to photograph but the final one is the best of the lot IMHO. The first one where they are canoodling is a standard (but nice) swan pose. The other one is telling a story - big time.

And Yes, I still have a Weston with its invercone and it works a treat. It cost an arm and a leg way back then.
Both the *istDS and the K5 are incurably addicted to old glass

My page on Photocrowd - link

andrewk

Link Posted 16/05/2015 - 10:04
I do remember the Weston meter and invercone but have never owned one. If you don't have an incident lightmeter, the best way to meter that shot is probably to take a reading off the palm of your hand (in the same light as the swans) using your camera set to spot metering and manual exposure - and then open up one stop. Alternatively, you could spot meter off the brightest part of the swan and open up two stops.

I have just checked the EXIF data for the swan shot. It was taken at F/9.5 1/750 ISO100 - which suggests that the camera was on full auto. It is about 1 full stop down on the Sunny 16 rule. Ignoring the camera metering and shooting at f/16 1/100sec ISO100 (or equivalent) would probably have worked out fine too.

Andrew
Flickr photostream
Last Edited by andrewk on 16/05/2015 - 10:21

Aero

Link Posted 16/05/2015 - 10:26
andrewk wrote:
I do remember the Weston meter and invercone but have never owned one. If you don't have an incident lightmeter, the best way to meter that shot is probably to take a reading off the palm of your hand (in the same light as the swans) using your camera set to spot metering and manual exposure - and then open up one stop.

Andrew

We're getting dangerously close to that splendidly divisive topic, the zone system.

Aitch53

Link Posted 16/05/2015 - 10:33
andrewk wrote:
I do remember the Weston meter and invercone but have never owned one. If you don't have an incident lightmeter, the best way to meter that shot is probably to take a reading off the palm of your hand (in the same light as the swans) using your camera set to spot metering and manual exposure - and then open up one stop. Alternatively, you could spot meter off the brightest part of the swan and open up two stops.

Back in the days of my first SLR (a Zenit 3m with the f3.5 Industar!), I used a cheap Boots exposure meter - a selenium cell one. By coincidence, my grey school trousers just happened to be just the right shade that I could take a reading off them and it would be spot on.

andrewk wrote:
I have just checked the EXIF data for the swan shot. It was taken at F/9.5 1/750 ISO100 - which suggests that the camera was on full auto. It is about 1 full stop down on the Sunny 16 rule. Ignoring the camera metering and shooting at f/16 1/100sec ISO100 (or equivalent) would probably have worked out fine too.

Andrew

True, however...

First, I am still getting used to the 'new' beast, so I want to get the feel for the Auto setting prior to branching out into the murky waters of manual.

Second, I prefer a fast shutter speed especially at the longer end of the range. It's a heavy beast and I'm not as young as I was.

Finally, when trying to follow fast moving (relatively) birds etc, one doesn't have time to faff around too much.

But thanks for your advice.
SteveH!

Some people call me 'strange'.
I prefer 'unconventional'.
But I'm willing to compromise and accept 'eccentric'.

andrewk

Link Posted 16/05/2015 - 12:46
Aitch53 wrote:
Second, I prefer a fast shutter speed especially at the longer end of the range. It's a heavy beast and I'm not as young as I was.

I think you might have overlooked "or equivalent". Shooting at f/8 1/500sec ISO100 is equivalent. Personally, I find shooting manual is way less faffing about - you do not have to reshoot when the automatics get it wrong, which in my experience is most of the time.

Andrew
Flickr photostream

Aitch53

Link Posted 16/05/2015 - 17:26
andrewk wrote:
Aitch53 wrote:
Second, I prefer a fast shutter speed especially at the longer end of the range. It's a heavy beast and I'm not as young as I was.

I think you might have overlooked "or equivalent". Shooting at f/8 1/500sec ISO100 is equivalent. Personally, I find shooting manual is way less faffing about - you do not have to reshoot when the automatics get it wrong, which in my experience is most of the time.

Andrew

Oops! Gotcha.

First thing I need to do is get really comfortable with the controls - I do miss the simplicity of my old MX - and that comes with use.
SteveH!

Some people call me 'strange'.
I prefer 'unconventional'.
But I'm willing to compromise and accept 'eccentric'.
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