Don't see these over the back garden every day...


LennyBloke

Link Posted 27/02/2021 - 12:30
Whilst tidying the back garden this morning without my glasses on I spotted what I though was a small murder of crows circling overhead, but something about their movement seemed rather more like birds of prey, so I ran into the house and grabbed the K1 MkII which had the A*300/2.8 and 1.7x AF Adaptor attached and snapped a few shots. It turns out they are birds of prey (not my field so don't know which type), the irony is that I couldn't get them all in one shot - there were about 8 to 10 of them circling on the thermals presumably.










The quality isn't quite as good as it would have been with one of the "matched converters" but I'm fairly pleased with the results, and even more with the experience
LennyBloke

Chrism8

Link Posted 27/02/2021 - 12:41
They are Buzzards John, well captured
Chris

www.chrismillsphotography.co.uk

" A Hangover is something that occupies the Head you neglected to use the night before".

-------------------------------------------------------------
K1 - Sigma 85mm F1.4, Pentax 150 -450 F4.5 / 5.6, Pentax FA 24 - 70 F2.8

Sigma 100-300 F4, Samyang 14mm F2.8, Pentax 70-200 F2.8

K3iii + K3ii + K5iis converted to IR, Sigma 17 - 70 F2.8, Pentax 55 - 300 F4.5 / F5.6 PLM
Last Edited by Chrism8 on 27/02/2021 - 12:52

Aitch53

Link Posted 27/02/2021 - 16:09
Nice.

The only birds of prey I've seen round here were a sparrowhawk dismembering a pigeon in our carpark and a red kite circling over the health centre. That second one was a bit worrying...
SteveH!

Some people call me 'strange'.
I prefer 'unconventional'.
But I'm willing to compromise and accept 'eccentric'.

PRYorkshire

Link Posted 27/02/2021 - 16:56
Nice shots John, number 2 is a cracker, I also like the bottom half of number 3 with the two birds flying side by side . Buzzards really suffered from pesticides in the 60's and were virtually wiped out. However in recent years numbers have increased greatly and they are now quite a common sight soaring over rough ground, calling to each other without mewing sound that is quite distinctive. We get them a lot over our house but always too high to got a good photo.
Paul

K1000, istD, K70

Sry

Link Posted 28/02/2021 - 21:11
Great light in those birds' wings LennyB. And I like the compositions (or crops) too. The term 'murder of crows' got me searching, and I came up with this:
https://www.countrylife.co.uk/nature/collective-nouns-for-birds-68344
What a conspiracy of collective nouns!

davidrobinson

Link Posted 01/03/2021 - 10:36
Great shots. Great to see them, we have quite a few about here some days, we even get one sitting in a tree above the nearby road. Its unusual but if there are good thermals about they can gather in quite large groups going higher and higher until yo cant see them. Hopefully you will see more as there numbers are increasing. We now get several Red Kites localy which was unheard of a few years ago.

LennyBloke

Link Posted 01/03/2021 - 21:28
Thanks for all the comments - it was a real pleasure to witness these Buzzards (cheers Chris) circling overhead, I've seen single and pairs before but never a Wake of Buzzards like this (Hey Serge - we've both learnt something )

I've seen a Sparrowhawk attacking a bird in the garden too Steve, it's not a pleasant site. I've not see Red Kites as yet David - your Gallery shots are superb, I'd be pleased to get that close! The increase in numbers of Birds of Prey has been noticeable over the past few years around here too Paul, lets hope we continue moving forward with reduction in pesticide use for the trend to continue - but it was quite disturbing to see the government have started to allow certain pesticides (for emergency use!) to assist with Sugar Beet growing - this particular one (thiamethoxam) is know to have been responsible for the decline in bee populations
LennyBloke

davidrobinson

Link Posted 01/03/2021 - 21:58
LennyBloke wrote:
Thanks for all the comments - it was a real pleasure to witness these Buzzards (cheers Chris) circling overhead, I've seen single and pairs before but never a Wake of Buzzards like this (Hey Serge - we've both learnt something )
It was quite disturbing to see the government have started to allow certain pesticides (for emergency use!) to assist with Sugar Beet growing - this particular one (thiamethoxam) is know to have been responsible for the decline in bee populations

Yes we dont seem to learn by our mistakes, taking the easy option isnt always the best. Lets hope its a one off, I certainly hope so.
If your as unhappy as me their is a Petition the links here link
All the best David

drofmit

Link Posted 01/03/2021 - 22:05
LennyBloke wrote:

"but it was quite disturbing to see the government have started to allow certain pesticides (for emergency use!) to assist with Sugar Beet growing - this particular one (thiamethoxam) is know to have been responsible for the decline in bee populations"

Fortunately, sugar beet never gets to the flowering stage as it is a biennial harvested after the first year..... however, the systemic is usually applied in the seed coating.... to my knowledge, no research has been done on the effect of residual amounts, and their effect on insects should an insect pollinated flowering crop [like flax] be grown the following season. It is also known that the chemical affects bats.... given that the reason the insecticide is used in the first case is to control the damage by the larvae of Noctuid moths.... many of whom I count in what I call "bat food" quantities when I put the mothtrap out.... especially the Yellow Underwings and Turnip moths.... both nice juicy prey for the bats.

And these are a very nice set of photos.... going back to the subject!
Never be afraid to talk about your techniques...
"Give a thousand photographers...
the same camera, lens and scene...
and you'll always get a thousand different takes!!"
Anon.
Last Edited by drofmit on 01/03/2021 - 22:07

womble

Link Posted 01/03/2021 - 22:44
Super photos. We have a lot of red kites around here, but not many buzzards. We had a Sparrowhawk that used to visit our garden a few years back. It had a different idea as to what the bird feeders are for...
Kris Lockyear
It is an illusion that photos are made with the camera… they are made with the eye, heart and head. Henri Cartier-Bresson
Lots of film bodies, a couple of digital ones, too many lenses (mainly older glass) and a Horseman LE 5x4.

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cardiffgareth

Link Posted 08/03/2021 - 11:47
I presume they are juvenile buzzards as they're normally a solitary bird. We get a load of them up here and when the farmer ploughs a certain field and the worms come up, we've counted over 30 in a single field all feeding! Started seeing Red Kites also as they're slowly coming back to this region
Gareth
Welsh Photographer

My outfit: K1 gripped - Pentax D FA 24-70mm - Sigma 70-200mm OS HSM - Pentax modified DA* 60-250mm f4 - Irix 15mm Firefly - Sigma 50-500mm - FA 50mm f1.4 - Tamron SP 90mm macro - Pentax AF 540 FGZ Ii

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davidwozhere

Link Posted 08/03/2021 - 22:34
Super pictures of one of the nicest things to watch in our skies. I think they they beat kites for watching especially when there is a mated pair and they start playing and tumbling 'out of control' as one 'attacks' the other.
Both the *istDS and the K5 are incurably addicted to old glass

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davidrobinson

Link Posted 08/03/2021 - 23:00
Their calls are wonderful, it can carry from very high up and miles away. I love to see and hear them. We saw and heard three yesterday quite low down to start with but in minutes they were pin pricks in the sky. Wonderfull to watch.
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